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Academic/University
CONSUMER PRODUCTS & SERVICES | Education & Training (non-internet/mobile) / Colleges & Universities
yale.edu

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Investments

7

Portfolio Exits

15

Partners & Customers

10

About Yale University

Yale University comprises three major academic components: Yale College (the undergraduate program), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the professional schools. In addition, Yale encompasses a wide array of centers and programs, libraries, museums, and administrative support offices.

Yale University Headquarter Location

PO Box 208288

New Haven, Connecticut, 06520,

United States

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Expert Collections containing Yale University

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Find Yale University in 1 Expert Collection, including Psychedelics.

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Psychedelics

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Yale University Web Traffic

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Yale University Rank

Latest Yale University News

Superconductivity & Charge Density Waves Caught Intertwining at the Nanoscale

May 22, 2022

CleanTechnica Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator LaboratoryBlue areas are superconducting regions, and yellow areas represent charge density waves. After a laser pulse (red), the superconducting regions are rapidly turned off and the charge density waves react by rearranging their pattern, becoming more orderly and coherent. By 9 seconds ago Room-temperature superconductors could transform everything from electrical grids to particle accelerators to computers — but before they can be realized, researchers need to better understand how existing high-temperature superconductors work. The team aimed infrared laser pulses at the YBCO sample to switch off its superconducting state, then used X-ray laser pulses to illuminate the sample and examined the X-ray light scattered from it. Their results revealed that regions of superconductivity and charge density waves were arranged in unexpected ways. Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Now, researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of British Columbia, Yale University and others have taken a step in that direction by studying the fast dynamics of a material called yttrium barium copper oxide, or YBCO. The team reports May 20 in Science that YBCO’s  superconductivity  is intertwined in unexpected ways with another phenomenon known as charge density waves (CDWs), or ripples in the density of electrons in the material. As the researchers expected, CDWs get stronger when they turned off YBCO’s  superconductivity . However, they were surprised to find the CDWs also suddenly became more spatially organized, suggesting  superconductivity  somehow fundamentally shapes the form of the CDWs at the nanoscale. “A big part of what we don’t know is the relationship between charge density waves and  superconductivity ,” said Giacomo Coslovich, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led the study. “As one of the cleanest high-temperature superconductors that can be grown, YBCO offers us the opportunity to understand this physics in a very direct way, minimizing the effects of disorder.” He added, “If we can better understand these materials, we can make new superconductors that work at higher temperatures, enabling many more applications and potentially addressing a lot of societal challenges — from climate change to energy efficiency to availability of fresh water.” Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Artist’s rendering of an infrared laser quenching charge density waves. Observing fast dynamics The researchers studied YBCO’s dynamics at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser. They switched off  superconductivity  in the YBCO samples with infrared laser pulses, and then bounced X-ray pulses off those samples. For each shot of X-rays, the team pieced together a kind of snapshot of the CDWs’ electron ripples. By pasting those together, they recreated the CDWs rapid evolution. “We did these experiments at the LCLS because we needed ultrashort pulses of X-rays, which can be made at very few places in the world. And we also needed soft X-rays, which have longer wavelengths than typical X-rays, to directly detect the CDWs,” said staff scientist and study co-author Joshua Turner, who is also a researcher at the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences. “Plus, the people at LCLS are really great to work with.” These LCLS experiments generated terabytes of data, a challenge for processing. “Using many hours of supercomputing time, LCLS beamline scientists binned our huge amounts of data into a more manageable form so our algorithms could extract the feature characteristics,” said MengXing (Ketty) Na, a University of British Columbia graduate student and co-author on the project. The team found that charge density waves within the YBCO samples became more correlated — that is, more electron ripples were periodic or spatially synchronized — after lasers switched off the superconductivity . “Doubling the number of waves that are correlated with just a flash of light is quite remarkable, because light typically would produce the opposite effect. We can use light to completely disorder the charge density waves if we push too hard,” Coslovich said. To explain these experimental observations, the researchers then modeled how regions of CDWs and  superconductivity  ought to interact given a variety of underlying assumptions about how YBCO works. For example, their initial model assumed that a uniform region of  superconductivity when shut off with light would become a uniform CDW region — but of course that didn’t agree with their results. “The model that best fits our data so far indicates that  superconductivity  is acting like a defect within a pattern of the waves. This suggests that  superconductivity  and charge density waves like to be arranged in a very specific, nanoscopic way,” explained Coslovich. “They are intertwined orders at the length scale of the waves themselves.” Illuminating the future Coslovich said that being able to turn  superconductivity  off with light pulses was a significant advance, enabling observations on the time scale of less than a trillionth of a second, with major advantages over previous approaches. “When you use other methods, like applying a high magnetic field, you have to wait a long time before making measurements, so CDWs rearrange around disorder and other phenomena can take place in the sample,” he said. “Using light allowed us to show this is an intrinsic effect, a real connection between  superconductivity  and charge density waves.” The research team is excited to expand on this pivotal work, Turner said. First, they want to study how the CDWs become more organized when the  superconductivity  is shut off with light. They are also planning to tune the laser’s wavelength or polarization in future LCLS experiments in hopes of also using light to enhance, instead of quench, the superconducting state, so they could readily turn the superconducting state off and on. “There is an overall interest in trying to do this with pulses of light on very fast time scales, because that can potentially lead to the development of superconducting, light-controlled devices for the new generation of electronics and computing,” said Coslovich. “Ultimately, this work can also help guide people who are trying to build room-temperature superconductors.” This research is part of a collaboration between researchers from LCLS, SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), UBC, Yale University, the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique in Canada, North Carolina State University, Universita Cattolica di Brescia and other institutions. This work was funded in part by the DOE Office of Science. LCLS and SSRL are DOE Office of Science user facilities.

Yale University Investments

7 Investments

Yale University has made 7 investments. Their latest investment was in CertiK as part of their Series A - II on July 7, 2021.

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Yale University Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

7/14/2021

Series A - II

CertiK

$37M

Yes

20

9/13/2016

Seed VC

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$99M

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10

12/19/2014

Seed VC

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$99M

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10

10/23/2014

Series B

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$99M

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10

10/21/2013

Seed VC

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$99M

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10

Date

7/14/2021

9/13/2016

12/19/2014

10/23/2014

10/21/2013

Round

Series A - II

Seed VC

Seed VC

Series B

Seed VC

Company

CertiK

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Subscribe to see more

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Amount

$37M

$99M

$99M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

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Co-Investors

Sources

20

10

10

10

10

Yale University Portfolio Exits

15 Portfolio Exits

Yale University has 15 portfolio exits. Their latest portfolio exit was IsoPlexis on October 08, 2021.

Date

Exit

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Acquirer

Sources

10/8/2021

IPO

6

1/7/2021

Acquired

1

7/24/2020

IPO

$99M

4

5/9/2019

IPO

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$99M

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10

12/17/2018

Acquired

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$99M

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10

Date

10/8/2021

1/7/2021

7/24/2020

5/9/2019

12/17/2018

Exit

IPO

Acquired

IPO

IPO

Acquired

Companies

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Valuation

$99M

$99M

$99M

Acquirer

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Sources

6

1

4

10

10

Yale University Partners & Customers

10 Partners and customers

Yale University has 10 strategic partners and customers. Yale University recently partnered with Avelo Airlines on March 3, 2022.

Date

Type

Business Partner

Country

News Snippet

Sources

3/4/2022

Partner

United States

Yale Athletics Partners with Avelo Airlines.

As a Yale partner , Avelo Airlines will be a prominent part of Bulldog gamedays which include in-event promotions , digital signage , contests , banners , social media campaigns , public address announcements and more .

1

11/11/2021

Partner

United States

YSE Partners with World Bank on Identifying Industrial Symbiosis Opportunities.

In an effort to facilitate the use of one company 's waste for another 's reuse -- a process known as industrial symbiosis -- the World Bank is launching a global platform next month in partnership with the Yale that will provide public access to information about exchange opportunities .

1

10/26/2021

Vendor

United States

Turner to Target Net Zero Energy for Yale University's Physical Sciences and Engineering Building - HOCHTIEF

Turner Construction Company 's Connecticut office was awarded preconstruction consultancy services for the $ 365 million contract for Yale , which will feature forward-thinking sustainability efforts targeting net-zero energy performance .

2

6/24/2021

Partner

India

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10

5/10/2021

Partner

Germany

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10

Date

3/4/2022

11/11/2021

10/26/2021

6/24/2021

5/10/2021

Type

Partner

Partner

Vendor

Partner

Partner

Business Partner

Country

United States

United States

United States

India

Germany

News Snippet

Yale Athletics Partners with Avelo Airlines.

As a Yale partner , Avelo Airlines will be a prominent part of Bulldog gamedays which include in-event promotions , digital signage , contests , banners , social media campaigns , public address announcements and more .

YSE Partners with World Bank on Identifying Industrial Symbiosis Opportunities.

In an effort to facilitate the use of one company 's waste for another 's reuse -- a process known as industrial symbiosis -- the World Bank is launching a global platform next month in partnership with the Yale that will provide public access to information about exchange opportunities .

Turner to Target Net Zero Energy for Yale University's Physical Sciences and Engineering Building - HOCHTIEF

Turner Construction Company 's Connecticut office was awarded preconstruction consultancy services for the $ 365 million contract for Yale , which will feature forward-thinking sustainability efforts targeting net-zero energy performance .

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Sources

1

1

2

10

10

Yale University Team

8 Team Members

Yale University has 8 team members, including current Senior Vice President, Jack Callahan.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

Sean K Mehra

Founder

Current

Jack Callahan

Senior Vice President

Current

E. Jonathan Soderstrom

Managing Director

Current

Seth Feuerstein

Magellan Health, Carigent Therapeutics, Connecticut State Government, and Elm Street Ventures

Founder

Former

Louis W. Gresham

Chief Executive Officer

Former

Name

Sean K Mehra

Jack Callahan

E. Jonathan Soderstrom

Seth Feuerstein

Louis W. Gresham

Work History

Magellan Health, Carigent Therapeutics, Connecticut State Government, and Elm Street Ventures

Title

Founder

Senior Vice President

Managing Director

Founder

Chief Executive Officer

Status

Current

Current

Current

Former

Former

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