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Investments

9

Portfolio Exits

2

Partners & Customers

1

About Yale Entrepreneurial Institute

The Yale Entrepreneurial Institute (YEI) was formed to help undergraduate and graduate Yale students start scaleable new ventures. While initially existing as a stand-alone 10-week summer program, YEI has since expanded into a year-round University department acting as a portal for entrepreneurship on campus and offering programs and events year round that serve the entrepreneurial interest of students and the New Haven community.

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Headquarter Location

New Haven, Connecticut, 06520,

United States

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Latest Yale Entrepreneurial Institute News

Publishers v. Privacy - Registration Is Coming

Jul 26, 2019

Email address: Ka Mo Lau is COO of Thunder Experience Cloud, prior to Thunder, he spent time as an investment banker at Credit Suisse and as a management consultant at IBM. Ka Mo holds a BA in economics from Yale University and is a fellow of the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute. He has also served as the Executive Director of the Elmseed Enterprise Fund, the oldest student-run microlending organization in America The introduction of ad blocking, browser-level advertising and browser-blocking of tracking and cookies should have heralded the beginning of more anonymous browsing. Instead, these innovations may lead to more user registration and tracking, albeit in a potentially more consent-based manner. Publishers will soon be waging a greater battle with privacy to build a sustainable ad-supported business, writes,  Ka Mo Lau, COO of Thunder Experience Cloud. “Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!” declared Michael Corleone in The Godfather: Part III. While he was talking about escaping the decisions and life he made for himself in the past, he might as well have been describing modern-day consumers trying to escape the clutches of digital tracking. With mainstream organizations such as Apple and Firefox implementing tough digital consumer privacy standards and upstarts like Brave and DuckDuckGo introducing new privacy-centric digital services, the average internet user would be forgiven for thinking that they’re now out of the data-driven advertising ecosystem and requests for their personal data are on the retreat. However, the days of anonymous browsing may be short-lived as the industry brings consumers back to the fold. Prepare for the rise of registration walls. What has led publishers and ad tech to build new ways to protect their ecosystem? Browser tech developers have been busy innovating on delivering new consumer experiences, but as a result, have been harming publishers’ own monetization of ad inventory. Some innovators have focused on ad-blocking browser plug-ins that may make browsing free of ads. As a publisher or content creator that depends on ad revenue, companies are facing a severe impact on their monetization and ability to sustain themselves. In turn, some publishers have put up paywalls or offer walls to get adblockers to enable ads or pay for content access. Other tech innovators have redesigned where targeted ads go. The new Brave browser moves targeted ads from the webpage into the browser itself in notification type ads. These ads monetize data, with the consumer also sharing in the revenue and controlling info. Publishers can “opt-in” to receive a portion of the targeted revenue or forego their previous digital ad revenue streams. In essence, they’re being held hostage to accept a fraction of the revenue they were making under programmatic advertising and existing monetization strategies. Publishers are essentially prevented by this type of browser from serving the ads they sold. They are hoping this browser does not take off, but if it did, they would need to gate content with ways to improve monetization like paywalls. At the largest scale of impact, major browser makers such as Mozilla (creator of Firefox) and Apple (creator of Safari) have restricted ad targeting by implementing intelligent tracking protection (ITP) measures that prevent third-parties (those who don’t own the webpage you’re visiting) from tracking an individual across webpages to build measurement and targeting profile. If you cannot drop a third-party cookie, you cannot track the user across sites and communicate with other third-parties about the user. ITP fundamentally breaks the basic building blocks of desktop programmatic advertising, which relies on third-party cookies to communicate with each other to build a user profile and conduct a programmatic auction of an impression for a given user showing up on a publisher website. Without knowing who the user is in the action, advertisers cannot value the impression as much, and publishers cannot make nearly as much money from their ad inventory. As a result of ITP, first-party data becomes incredibly valuable. A publisher’s own data on a user could allow advertisers to still value the impression highly, especially if it was coupled with other publishers and platforms’ data to build a robust user profile for ad targeting. The challenge is that first-party data for ITP browser environments is tracked only against first-party cookies, as in cookies coming from the domain of the website you’re visiting and not any third-party tool like an ad server or DMP that may have code on that very site. Consequently, auctioning the first-party cookie as a publisher for ITP browser users is currently a bit meaningless because no other party can read/recognize/synchronize your cookie. The data is siloed and undervalued as a result. Basically, no one can bid on that impression because they know who is seeing that impression due to the ITP restrictions. With the advent of people-based marketing, a solution has arisen to the ITP problem. A publisher that can tie personally identifiable information (PII) data to first-party cookies can create a targetable, persistent person identifier. The publisher would then find advertisers who also have PII on the consumers they want to reach and then use the publisher’s first-party cookies to target the ads only within the publisher site to those desired persons. This method would be incredibly manual and hard to scale for most advertisers across multiple publishers. Ideally, the advertisers can use a single buying platform like a DSP to target all the individuals the advertisers want across multiple sites. However, a common identifier in auctions across first-party cookies wasn’t possible without PII and the concept of people-based marketing. Historically, these programmatic auctions and their supporting tech platforms relied on lots of third-party cookies syncing with each other, so that they could also have a common understanding of who they were buying and selling impressions for even if they didn’t know the underlying details of the person in the real world. Utilizing a person-based identifier tied to PII instead of cookies in the auction would be a possible solution. A company with a strong identity graph would work with publishers and advertisers to create a common person identifier tied to first-party cookies by publishers that allow a common ID. So for a given consumer, publisher A would have a publisherA first-party cookie tied to Name1+Email1, while publisher B would have a publisherB first-party cookie tied to Name1+Email1. With proper privacy protections like hashing data, a graph provider would map on the backend Name1+Email1 to personA ID to its own person-identifierX for that person. The same provider would map Name1+Email1 for publisher B to the very same person-identifierX. The person-identifierX exists as data that can be stored and written outside the browser, so it isn’t blocked and can be exchanged easily in server to server communications. Now there is mapping across publishers for a given person, so an advertiser only has to look for person-identifierX in auctions and buy that ID, since it won’t be able to see third-party cookies by ad tech providers in auctions. With the mechanism for mapping a person across the programmatic ecosystem solved, the question is how are publishers going to get PII from readers to scale enough to support programmatic auction? Well, expect more “registration walls” to pop up upon visiting a site, forcing you to register or log in to proceed. Registration has the benefit of also collecting consent tied to a person, rather than a temporary cookie or device identifier which can get wiped. This consent can be used much more effectively for user control of privacy and ad settings by publisher. Registration also then has the benefit of creating a pool of PII that is tied to first-party cookies when users login, which can then be mapped to an anonymized person-identifier that can be used to facilitate ad auctions now on sites. Viola! You now have an ITP-compliant method of conducting programmatic auctions using consent-based and people-based advertising. Users are increasingly trying out these new browser innovations, whether by upgrading existing browsers, adding plugins or switching browsers. Publishers will increasingly need to figure out how to still monetize best, and programmatic remains their most effective method for capturing as much of the economic value of an impression as possible. Consequently, expect to be prompted more to register, login, and/or pay. Advertising will always find a way to bring the consumer back into the ecosystem. Did you find this useful? Yes

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Investments

9 Investments

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute has made 9 investments. Their latest investment was in Rally as part of their Pre-Seed on January 1, 2015.

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Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

1/26/2015

Pre-Seed

Rally

$1.25M

Yes

2

2/17/2014

Seed

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$99M

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10

11/5/2009

Incubator/Accelerator

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0

Incubator/Accelerator

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0

Other Investors

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0

Date

1/26/2015

2/17/2014

11/5/2009

Round

Pre-Seed

Seed

Incubator/Accelerator

Incubator/Accelerator

Other Investors

Company

Rally

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Amount

$1.25M

$99M

New?

Yes

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Co-Investors

Sources

2

10

0

0

0

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Portfolio Exits

2 Portfolio Exits

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute has 2 portfolio exits. Their latest portfolio exit was Rally on June 01, 2022.

Date

Exit

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Acquirer

Sources

6/1/2022

Acq - Pending

$99M

1

2/4/2021

Acquired

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$99M

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10

Date

6/1/2022

2/4/2021

Exit

Acq - Pending

Acquired

Companies

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Valuation

$99M

$99M

Acquirer

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Sources

1

10

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Partners & Customers

1 Partners and customers

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute has 1 strategic partners and customers. Yale Entrepreneurial Institute recently partnered with Canaan Partners on September 9, 2015.

Date

Type

Business Partner

Country

News Snippet

Sources

9/22/2015

Partner

United States

Canaan Partners and Yale Entrepreneurial Institute to Launch Fellowship Program

Venture capital firm Canaan Partners is partnering with the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute , a university department that helps entrepreneurs and innovators at Yale Entrepreneurial Institute start scalable new ventures , to establish fellowships that will foster entrepreneurship skills for Yale University students who are interested in healthcare .

3

Date

9/22/2015

Type

Partner

Business Partner

Country

United States

News Snippet

Canaan Partners and Yale Entrepreneurial Institute to Launch Fellowship Program

Venture capital firm Canaan Partners is partnering with the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute , a university department that helps entrepreneurs and innovators at Yale Entrepreneurial Institute start scalable new ventures , to establish fellowships that will foster entrepreneurship skills for Yale University students who are interested in healthcare .

Sources

3

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute Team

1 Team Member

Yale Entrepreneurial Institute has 1 team member, including current Founder, Sean Glass.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

Sean Glass

ResolutionTube, Novak Biddle Venture Partners, JobCompass, and Higher One

Founder

Current

Name

Sean Glass

Work History

ResolutionTube, Novak Biddle Venture Partners, JobCompass, and Higher One

Title

Founder

Status

Current

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