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Angel Investor (Individual)
linkedin.com/in/willherman

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Investments

12

Portfolio Exits

3

About Will Herman

Will Herman is a Boston-based angel investor who typically invests $50K-$100K in young companies. Herman prefers to invest in software and internet companies primarily although will selectively look at hardware opportunities. His focus is on Boston area investments, but he is open to opportunities and teams from anywhere. He aims to bring value to his portfolio companies through mentorship of the CEO on topics ranging froms sales, product development, company structure. Herman is a former CEO of Innoveda, Inc, a supplier of Electronic Design Automation (EDA) software tools and services which was acquired by Mentor Graphics in 2002. Innoveda, a public company, was created through the mergers of Viewlogic Systems and Summit Design, another EDA provider. Will co-founded Viewlogic Systems in 1984 and left the company in 1992, a year after the company's IPO. He rejoined the company 1995 initially as President, then as CEO. Viewlogic Systems was acquired by Synopsys in 1997. <br /><br />During his hiatus from Viewlogic, Will was first the President of Scopus Technology, Inc. a supplier of software automation tools in the customer information systems marketplace. He later joined startup Silerity, Inc., a developer of high-performance logic and physical synthesis tools where he was President and CEO. Silerity was purchased by Viewlogic in 1995, thus completing the great career circle of life for Will.<br /><br />Prior to founding Viewlogic, Will held management positions at Digital Equipment Corporation and was involved in two other software startup operations, Dataware Logic, which he founded, and Health Care Computer Systems. He currently is a director of three private companies; Carbon Design, StillSecure, and TrustPlus. He's also a mentor at TechStars and an active angel investor in the Boston area. Previously, he served as a director of several other public and private companies including, Template Graphics Software, Hall Kinion, Rebar, Lexra, Quintus, Viewlogic Systems, Innoveda, Silerity, ChannelWave, AccuRev, and Bionaut Pharmaceuticals.

Will Herman Headquarter Location

Boston, Massachusetts,

United States

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Latest Will Herman News

Will Herman Cain’s Death Change Republican Views on the Virus and Masks?

Jul 31, 2020

His publicly dismissive attitude about the pandemic reflected the hands-off inconsistency of many party leaders. Herman Cain’s passing makes conservative leaders confront the deadly reality of the coronavirus.Credit...Brian Snyder/Reuters July 30, 2020, 7:25 p.m. ET The death on Thursday of Herman Cain , attributed to the coronavirus, has confronted President Trump and other Republicans with the reality of the pandemic as it hit closer to home than ever before, claiming a prominent ally of Mr. Trump, one whose frequently dismissive attitude about health precautions reflected the hands-off inconsistency of party leaders. Mr. Cain, a former business executive and candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012, had an irreverent, confrontational style that mirrored the president’s own brand of contrarian politics. In his more recent role as a public face for the president’s re-election campaign, he became an emblem of Trump-supporting, mask-defiant science skeptics, openly if not aggressively disdainful of public health officials who warned Americans to avoid large crowds, cover their faces and do as much as possible to limit contact with others. His view was shared by many conservatives, who have applied a hard-nosed, culture war mentality to the virus, the most serious public health crisis in a century. Mr. Trump wrote in praise of Mr. Cain on Twitter on Thursday, calling him “a Powerful Voice of Freedom and all that is good.” But Mr. Cain’s death showed how ill-suited that mind-set is to the country’s current predicament. More than 150,000 Americans have died in a pandemic that is ravaging parts of the country where conservative leaders long resisted taking steps that have slowed the virus elsewhere, such as mask mandates and stay-at-home orders. Those include places like Tulsa, Okla., where Mr. Cain attended a Trump campaign rally in June and showed his disregard for safety precautions on social media shortly before receiving a diagnosis for the virus . With a uniformity that has defied rising death tolls in their own backyards, Republicans at the federal, state and local levels have adopted a similar tone of skepticism and defiance, rejecting the advice of public health officials and deferring instead to principles they said were equally important: conservative values of economic freedom and personal liberty. From Arizona to Texas, as infection rates soared and hospital beds filled up, Republican governors stood in the way of local governments that wanted to do more. They overruled city mask mandates, arguing that it amounted to a form of government overreach. They said that requiring businesses to close or limit their capacity would strangle the economy and save few lives. They accused the news media and political opponents of exaggerating the risks to hurt the president’s chances for re-election. They scorned the experts and mocked those who heeded the government’s warnings. Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida, a close ally and vigorous defender of the president, walked around the Capitol in March wearing a Hazmat-style gas mask as he prepared to vote on coronavirus relief legislation. The governor of Oklahoma, Kevin Stitt, posted a picture of himself eating dinner with his family at a crowded restaurant a few days after the World Health Organization formally declared a pandemic. “It’s packed tonight!” his caption read. And this month in Missouri, Gov. Mike Parson scoffed at the idea of a mask mandate, telling a cheering crowd of supporters, “You don’t need government to tell you to wear a dang mask.” Yet the virus more than occasionally reminded them that it strikes people of all political stripes indiscriminately. After his mask stunt, Mr. Gaetz learned that he might have been exposed to someone who was infected and attended the Conservative Political Action Conference. He said he would enter quarantine, and he did not end up having the virus. Mr. Stitt tested positive for the virus this month, the first governor in the country to do so. He continues to resist pressure to issue a mask order, calling it “a personal preference.” And this week, adding to the list of people with direct access to the president who have tested positive was Robert C. O’Brien, the national security adviser. Others include Kimberly Guilfoyle , a former Fox News commentator who is dating Donald Trump Jr. and is helping lead the Trump campaign’s fund-raising efforts. Among some conservative defenders of the president, there is a sense that complaints about masks and other mandates as a threat to personal freedom are overblown. Grover Norquist, a conservative activist who lobbies for lower taxes and regulations and has served on the board of the National Rifle Association, said that using Mr. Cain’s death to attack Republicans “is going two steps too far.” But he added, “There’s a difference between not being excited about being told what to do” and refusing to do it altogether. “But on something like this, when you’re out in public, you should wear a mask because it’s not about you.” Yet there have been few indications that the spate of coronavirus cases among Republicans is leading to any kind of major reckoning in the party. After Representative Louie Gohmert of Texas tested positive this week, he blamed his diagnosis on wearing a mask. Mr. Trump, who has spoken of being rattled by the death of an old friend who contracted the virus, has been photographed only rarely with a mask on and has repeatedly said he does not consider wearing one the appropriate step for him. He has allowed, however, that he is supportive of mask-wearing by others. The visuals that emerged from the White House from the beginning of the pandemic suggested an attitude that was, at best, not overly cautious. At an event at the White House in March with executives from Walmart and Walgreens in which Mr. Trump praised his administration’s preparedness, he shook hands and patted the backs of multiple people, prompting critics to complain that the president was sending mixed signals to the public. When the virus re-emerged after it initially appeared to have been subdued, it took weeks of public pressure and private lobbying by advisers and friends for before Mr. Trump more frankly acknowledged the toll the resurgent virus has taken across the American South and West. Evan McMullin, who ran against Mr. Trump as a third-party candidate in 2016, wrote on Twitter that Mr. Cain was “the first senior casualty of the science denial Trump cult.” In an interview, Mr. McMullin said he had little hope this was a wake-up call. “I wish that was the case,” he said. “Many voters who support the president live in a totally different, alternate information environment in which the news of Herman Cain’s death — his visit to the Trump rally, his decision to not wear a mask — won’t reach them.” Mr. Cain was eager to display his disregard for the experts and their warnings. Before the Trump rally in Tulsa, which local public health officials had urged the campaign to postpone, Mr. Cain urged people to “Ignore the outrage” and to defy “the left-wing shaming!” Mr. Trump did at one point reschedule the rally, but only after an outpouring of anger that it had been scheduled for the day of Juneteenth, the holiday commemorating the emancipation of slaves. When the rally went forward on June 20, Mr. Cain, one of the most prominent African-American Trump supporters and a member of his Black Voices for Trump coalition, posed for a photo with other Black attendees. None, including him, wore masks. A few hours before the event, the campaign had disclosed that six Trump campaign staff members who had been working on the rally had tested positive for the coronavirus during a routine screening. Mr. Cain tested positive on June 29. On July 2, his staff announced that he had been hospitalized. Weighing in on the no-mask policy for a Trump rally planned at Mount Rushmore on July 3, Mr. Cain’s Twitter feed was approving: “PEOPLE ARE FED UP!” Our 2020 Election Guide

Will Herman Investments

12 Investments

Will Herman has made 12 investments. Their latest investment was in ecoVent Systems as part of their Seed - II on October 10, 2014.

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Will Herman Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

10/14/2014

Seed - II

ecoVent Systems

$2.2M

Yes

2

9/15/2014

Seed VC

DipJar

$0.42M

Yes

3

7/30/2014

Seed VC

ViralGains

$2.8M

Yes

2

12/20/2012

Seed VC

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$99M

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10

10/18/2012

Seed VC

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$99M

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10

Date

10/14/2014

9/15/2014

7/30/2014

12/20/2012

10/18/2012

Round

Seed - II

Seed VC

Seed VC

Seed VC

Seed VC

Company

ecoVent Systems

DipJar

ViralGains

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Amount

$2.2M

$0.42M

$2.8M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

Yes

Yes

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Co-Investors

Sources

2

3

2

10

10

Will Herman Portfolio Exits

3 Portfolio Exits

Will Herman has 3 portfolio exits. Their latest portfolio exit was Zagster on June 05, 2020.

Date

Exit

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Acquirer

Sources

6/5/2020

Acquired

1

00/00/0000

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$991

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10

00/00/0000

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$991

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10

Date

6/5/2020

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Exit

Acquired

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Companies

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Valuation

$991

$991

Acquirer

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Sources

1

10

10

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