Predict your next investment

Academic/University
CONSUMER PRODUCTS & SERVICES | Education & Training (non-internet/mobile) / Colleges & Universities
unimelb.edu.au

See what CB Insights has to offer

Investments

11

Funds

2

Partners & Customers

10

About University of Melbourne

University of Melbourne is a public research university located in Melbourne, Australia.

University of Melbourne Headquarter Location

Parkville

Melbourne, Victoria, 3010,

Australia

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

University of Melbourne Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
CBI Logo

University of Melbourne Rank

Latest University of Melbourne News

How global COVID-19 pandemic restrictions shed light on the relationship between transport and air pollution

Aug 10, 2022

by Kerry Nice, Jason Thompson, Sachith Seneviratne and Mark Stevenson, University of Melbourne Unexplained NO2 (ppb) (top row) and PM10 (μg/m3) (bottom row) across cities in China, United States and Italy. DOI: 10.1016/j.apr.2022.101438 As around 4 billion people around the world shut their doors during the COVID-19 pandemic—cutting their travel by more than half—city skies that were once overcast with air pollution began to clear up. For governments around the world, public health responses early in the COVID-19 pandemic included restricting movement to reduce rates of disease transmission. While these restrictions were effective in dampening case numbers, they also produced significantly lower levels of air pollution. For a brief period, the world enjoyed blue skies. However, similar to the phenomenon associated with the global financial crisis, the wonder of clean air was short-lived as the world rode a path back to recovery. In the case of COVID-19, air pollution levels rebounded sharply once those lockdowns lifted. In fact, in many cases it became even worse, depending on the predominant mode of transport in different countries. For example, many people seeking to stay socially distanced in cities around the world avoided using public transport, instead swapping their train and tram commutes for more polluting private car trips. Even the journeys avoided by workers who could switch to working from home were often offset by increased home deliveries or non-work leisure travel. In an effort to return to business as usual as quickly as possible post-pandemic, governments like that of the U.S. issued stimulus payments to its citizens and encouraged workplaces to reopen in an effort to "return to normal." But this return to normal missed a significant opportunity to lock in the reductions in pollution that had been achieved and boost the associated population and public health benefits. Every year, an estimated 4.2 million people die prematurely from exposure to pollutants like fine particulate matter (PM2.5). These are inhalable particles so small they cannot be seen with the naked eye and are emitted from the combustion of fossil fuels. Animated map of global NO2 anomalies over 2020. Blue indicates reductions over normal expected levels (i.e. if the pandemic had not occurred) while red indicates increased pollution levels over this baseline. Credit: Dr Kerry Nice An estimated further 250,000 people die prematurely from exposure to ozone (O3), which is formed when pollutants emitted by cars and power plants react in the presence of sunlight. Given the urgency of pollution-related health issues, our new study published in Atmospheric Pollution Research highlights the impact of pandemic restrictions—and reduced human mobility more broadly—on air pollution. While previous studies have presented case studies on pandemic air quality in a number of countries or a selection of cities, this study analyzed air pollution data from a collection of over 700 cities (all the cities for which this data was available) around the world. Using data on weather patterns and past levels of pollution, we taught machine learning models—these are programs that can find patterns or make decisions from previously unseen data—to predict what pollution levels would be like in each individual city if the pandemic hadn't occurred. By using this comprehensive sample of cities, our machine learning-based analysis highlights what could be achieved in each city—and globally—through the changes to transport patterns during lockdowns. Our study showed that cities in China, Europe and India saw large decreases in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and PM2.5—two pollutants highly associated with burning fossil fuels and car usage—that align with pandemic stringency levels including the reductions in mobility. As the graphs show, NO2 levels (and to a lesser extent, PM2.5 levels) dropped around February/March 2020. In comparison, NO2 levels in Italy didn't change until March or April of that year. Ozone (O3) levels rose in the first half of 2020, with the atmospheric chemical reactions that create ozone driven by the reductions in NO2. However, levels reduced below normal levels during the Northern Hemisphere's summer months, when O3 levels normally peak. Countries like China and India enjoyed the greatest reductions in ambient particulate matter. This is particularly important as these two countries face some of the most severe health consequences of air pollution—together accounting for more than half of the world's PM2.5 exposure-related deaths. The pandemic has provided a natural experiment in understanding the relationship between transport modes and air pollution . To fulfill some of the promise we saw during the pandemic's rapid drops in pollution, cities might aim to transform mobility through active and pollution-free transport. The mobility changes over 2020 have given us an opportunity to examine how our use of transport systems contribute to pollution. For example, New York City and Tokyo saw commensurate drops in pollution as mobility ceased across all types of transport during COVID's first wave. However, when opening up after the first lockdown, New York City's mobility returned largely through private motor vehicle journeys—far exceeding previous baselines, with public transport levels never returning to normal levels. Meanwhile, in Tokyo, both public transport usage and automobile journeys rebounded at more equal rates. Cities like Brussels, Rome and Paris have created a combined 250 kilometers of new cycling paths as part of post-pandemic transportation plans. Australian cities have yet to do the same—there is certainly no shortage of demand for cycling infrastructure. Post-pandemic, weekly volumes of bikes on cycling paths increased by 140 percent on the South Perth Foreshore, by 165 percent on the Outer Harbour Greenway in Adelaide, and by a whopping 169 percent on the Bay Trail in Brighton in Victoria. Creating cycling lanes, along with providing other forms of transport like ride sharing, gives cities a means of lowering emissions. People who can work from home should do so, eliminating the need for daily commutes to the workplace altogether. If governments want to protect their populations from pollution-related illnesses and death, they will need to create alternative transport systems that aren't centered around private car journeys. Only then will our "new normal" allow us to enjoy clear skies and longer lives. Explore further

University of Melbourne Investments

11 Investments

University of Melbourne has made 11 investments. Their latest investment was in Epiminder as part of their Bridge on March 3, 2022.

CBI Logo

University of Melbourne Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

3/15/2022

Bridge

Epiminder

$11.5M

No

1

5/28/2021

Series B

Synchron

$40M

Yes

20

10/9/2020

Series A

Epiminder

$12.89M

Yes

1

7/7/2020

Series A

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

9/26/2019

Series A

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

Date

3/15/2022

5/28/2021

10/9/2020

7/7/2020

9/26/2019

Round

Bridge

Series B

Series A

Series A

Series A

Company

Epiminder

Synchron

Epiminder

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Amount

$11.5M

$40M

$12.89M

$99M

$99M

New?

No

Yes

Yes

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Co-Investors

Sources

1

20

1

10

10

University of Melbourne Fund History

2 Fund Histories

University of Melbourne has 2 funds, including Tin Alley Ventures Fund.

Closing Date

Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

Sources

Tin Alley Ventures Fund

1

Genesis Pre-Seed Fund

10

Closing Date

Fund

Tin Alley Ventures Fund

Genesis Pre-Seed Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

Sources

1

10

University of Melbourne Partners & Customers

10 Partners and customers

University of Melbourne has 10 strategic partners and customers. University of Melbourne recently partnered with KPMG on July 7, 2022.

Date

Type

Business Partner

Country

News Snippet

Sources

7/21/2022

Vendor

Switzerland

University of Melbourne taps KPMG for finance, HR systems uplift

University of Melbourne taps KPMG Australia for finance , HR systems uplift

1

5/18/2022

Partner

Australia

1

3/30/2022

Partner

Australia

BTB Case Study: Pioneering Australian technology is keeping hospitals COVID-safe : MTPConnect

Melbourne based flag manufacturer Evan Evans -- established in 1877 and co-designer of the Australian flag in 1901 -- came on board as University of Melbourne 's product development and commercialisation partner , convinced of the potential of the product and the manufacturing efficiencies that it could achieve by re-purposing its flag making technology to manufacture the Medihood .

2

1/27/2022

Partner

Australia

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

10

1/26/2022

Partner

United States

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

10

Date

7/21/2022

5/18/2022

3/30/2022

1/27/2022

1/26/2022

Type

Vendor

Partner

Partner

Partner

Partner

Business Partner

Country

Switzerland

Australia

Australia

Australia

United States

News Snippet

University of Melbourne taps KPMG for finance, HR systems uplift

University of Melbourne taps KPMG Australia for finance , HR systems uplift

BTB Case Study: Pioneering Australian technology is keeping hospitals COVID-safe : MTPConnect

Melbourne based flag manufacturer Evan Evans -- established in 1877 and co-designer of the Australian flag in 1901 -- came on board as University of Melbourne 's product development and commercialisation partner , convinced of the potential of the product and the manufacturing efficiencies that it could achieve by re-purposing its flag making technology to manufacture the Medihood .

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Sources

1

1

2

10

10

University of Melbourne Team

3 Team Members

University of Melbourne has 3 team members, including current Chief Operating Officer, Allan Tait.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

Allan Tait

Chief Operating Officer

Current

Thenu Herath

President

Former

Niranjan Prabhu

Chief Information Officer

Former

Name

Allan Tait

Thenu Herath

Niranjan Prabhu

Work History

Title

Chief Operating Officer

President

Chief Information Officer

Status

Current

Former

Former

Discover the right solution for your team

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on vendors, products, partnerships, and patents to help your team find their next technology solution.

Request a demo

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.