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Investments

42

Funds

5

Partners & Customers

1

Service Providers

1

About Science Media

Science creates, scales and acquires successful digital businesses by bringing together the best ideas, talent, resources and financing through a centralized platform. Science focuses on three things: developing new businesses, providing emerging startups with operational strategy and capital, and transforming later-stage Internet ventures with new talent and innovations.

Science Media Headquarter Location

1447 Second Street Suite 200

Santa Monica, California, 90401,

United States

310-393-3024

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Expert Collections containing Science Media

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Find Science Media in 1 Expert Collection, including Fitness Tech.

F

Fitness Tech

227 items

We define fitness tech as companies leveraging software and technology to augment approaches to developing or maintaining physical fitness. Companies in this category develop tools and services including workout apps, wearables, and connected fitness equipment.

Science Media Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
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Latest Science Media News

Science Media Centre: Independent scientists react to Britain’s sudden embrace of CRISPR and agricultural biotechnology

May 27, 2022

Global Gene Editing Regulation Tracker Our interactive GLP global map explains the status of each country’s regulations for human and agricultural gene editing and gene drives. GLP 2021 Annual Report The GLP is committed to full transparency. Science Media Centre: Independent scientists react to Britain’s sudden embrace of CRISPR and agricultural biotechnology May 27, 2022 Credit: Phil Partridge/GNM This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation. The Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill, removing barriers to research into new gene editing technology, will be introduced in Parliament May 25. Follow the latest news and policy debates on agricultural biotech and biomedicine? Subscribe to our newsletter. Dr Adrian Ely Dr Adrian Ely, Reader in Technology and Sustainability at the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex, said: That these important decisions will be debated in parliament is to be welcomed. The issues go beyond technical risks and benefits, and any decisions will help to shape the future of the UK’s agri-food system. Allowing sufficient time for democratic inputs to the debate will be vital. Numerous studies show that most of the British public want GE food and ingredients to be labelled. How to deliver on these demands remains a key challenge for the Bill. Decisions in the UK are taking place in a dynamic trade context. They have implications not only for trade with the EU, but also with other countries that regulate GE differently or not at all. There are environmental opportunities associated with this technology, but also possible risks. Gene-editing can be used to develop herbicide tolerant crops, which under some management conditions can harm farmland biodiversity. How will the Bill address these types of concerns? Dr Penny Hundleby Dr Penny Hundleby, Senior Scientist at the John Innes Centre, said: Consumers are all too aware of the challenges that war, drought and climate change are having on our collective food security. If we are to meet the ambitious targets of addressing the demands of a growing population without further adding to the cost of living, and while also reducing the environmental impact of agriculture, we need to embrace all safe technologies that help us reach these goals. Gene editing and genome sequencing are great UK strengths, and through the new Genetic Technology Bill, they will move us into an exciting era of affordable, intelligent and precision-based plant breeding. Prof Jonathan Jones, Plant Scientist, The Sainsbury Laboratory, said: The proposed changes in regulation of gene edited crops are a very positive step in the right direction and will align the UK better with regulations outside the EU. I very much hope that in the future we will be able to go further. Crop varieties should be regulated on their properties rather than the method used to improve them, especially at a time when food prices are soaring. These new proposals, while enabling many useful innovations to go forward, will still leave crops improved with the GM method – such as blight resistant potatoes, or oilseeds that produce fish oil, or purple tomatoes – subject to the same excessive regulation as before. Prof Bruce Whitelaw Prof Bruce Whitelaw, Prof of Animal Biotechnology and Director of The Roslin Institute, said: The Precision Breeding Bill is great news for science. It is also great news for the diverse societies across our planet that benefit from the UK’s research and innovation. The opportunity offered by precision breeding to directly tackle food security and the many health challenges that we collectively face, is huge. This opportunity comes with responsibilities. We all want safe and appropriate food. We want the secure supply of food. We need to ensure the health and welfare of the many animals we farm while reducing the environmental footprint caused by agriculture. We want to sustain biodiversity and our rural communities in a fair manner. Precision breeding technologies can contribute to all these aspects addressing planet resilience. At the Roslin Institute we pioneer precision breeding applications across all farmed animal species with focus on mitigating external stresses farmed animals face. Indeed these stresses are not that distinct from ourselves, with disease resilience top of the list. The Precision Breeding Bill will better enable Roslin’s research, and that of colleagues across the UK research & innovation community, to provide leadership in this exciting field. Prof Andrew Thompson Prof Andrew Thompson, Head of Cranfield University’s Soil and Agri Food Institute, said: GMO technology from the 1980s has allowed us to create crop plants that use water more efficiently, generating “more crop per drop”- vital where food production is limited by water availability. These advances have had limited traction under the GMO regulatory system. More precise gene editing technologies, alongside a simpler regulatory regime proposed in the Genetic Technology Bill, will certainly help such advances to be fully exploited for the benefit of farmers, consumers and the environment. At Cranfield we are also helping commercial breeders to take up gene editing technology so they can more rapidly breed soft fruit varieties that have tastier, more nutritious and longer lasting fruit. Prof David Rose, Professor of Sustainable Agricultural Systems at Cranfield University, said: Gene editing has the medium-term potential to address food production and environmental challenges – for example, creating crop varieties that are higher yielding, with better nutritional benefits, and that are more tolerant to pest and disease, reducing fuel and chemical usage. However, there are legitimately held concerns about the potential for gene editing to consolidate power inequalities in the food supply chain, ethical concerns particularly about usage in animals, and the potential to facilitate greater intensification of farming which could harm the environment. All points of view need to be considered in the pursuit of development and regulatory principles that foster responsible innovation. Due to the time needed to pass legislation, consider a wide range of views, and produce and sell seeds to farmers, it is not a short-term fix to the cost of production crisis facing farmers. The Defra Chief Scientific Adviser in January said it was five years away. Prof Martin Warren Prof Martin Warren, Chief Scientific Officer at the Quadram Institute, said: The Genetic Technology Bill provides a wonderful opportunity to explore ways to address the nutritional-deficiency that is found in many crop-based foods. Gene editing allows for the development of plants with improved qualities that normally take many years to produce using traditional breeding programs. The ability to increase levels of key minerals such as iron and zinc and vitamins A, B and D in plants holds significant potential as a way to improve lifelong health through biofortification. As we move towards more crop-based sustainable diets the need to develop sustainable and healthy functional foods is clear. Prof Maurice Moloney Prof Maurice Moloney, Founder and managing partner of AgriTecKnowledge, and former CEO of Rothamsted Research, said: Moving modern breeding techniques into UK law is way overdue, but it was impossible under EU Commission Rules. It is a tangible example of how Brexit can deliver positive opportunities. However, moving forward with rational, science-based policies is urgent. North and South America are already there, China and India are now enacting new laws and the EU will revisit their 2018 ruling (which was against their own legal advice) soon. This is a great milestone, but the UK must accelerate this initiative or we shall be ‘also-rans’. The good news is that this change will also facilitate free-trade deals, where food and agriculture are always massive impediments. This is the opportunity to harmonize these regulations and remove non-tariff trade barriers. Prof John Dupré Prof John Dupré, philosopher of science from the University of Exeter, said: The relaxation of obstacles to the application of genome modification technologies to plants is to be welcomed. This technology undoubtedly presents very significant opportunities to improve the qualities of crop varieties in dimensions including disease resistance and thereby reduced pesticide use, climate adaptability and nutritional value. It is also good to see that, in accordance with the major recommendation of the recent Nuffield Council on Bioethics report on genome editing of farmed animals, no changes are to be made to the regulation of this technology for animals prior to the development of regulations to protect animal welfare. It will, of course, be vital to retain robust regulations and monitoring of new crop varieties on a range of properties ranging from effects on human health to potential environmental impact before licensing the introduction of new varieties. But shifting this regulation from a concern with the process of development to the characteristics of the specific product is entirely sensible. The successful implementation of this change of regulations will ultimately depend on public acceptance, and serious public engagement regarding the rationale and implications of this change will be essential. A version of this article was originally posted at the Science Media Centre and is reposted here with permission. The Science Media Centre can be found on Twitter @SMC_London The GLP featured this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. The viewpoint is the author’s own. The GLP’s goal is to stimulate constructive discourse on challenging science issues. The GLP Needs Your Help It is easier than ever for advocacy groups to spread disinformation on pressing science issues, such as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. No, vaccines are not harmful. Yes, the use of biotechnology, GMOs or gene editing to develop antigens for treatments including vaccines are part of the solution. To inform the public about what’s really going on, we present the facts and challenge those who don't. We can’t do this work without your help. Please support us – a donation of as little as $10 a month helps support our vital myth-busting efforts.

Science Media Investments

42 Investments

Science Media has made 42 investments. Their latest investment was in OffLimits as part of their Seed VC on August 8, 2021.

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Science Media Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

8/5/2021

Seed VC

OffLimits

$2.3M

Yes

2

7/23/2020

Seed VC

Arrive Outdoors

$4.75M

Yes

5

7/1/2020

Seed VC

Heavy Sound Labs

Yes

1

8/5/2019

Seed VC

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

6/6/2019

Series A

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

Date

8/5/2021

7/23/2020

7/1/2020

8/5/2019

6/6/2019

Round

Seed VC

Seed VC

Seed VC

Seed VC

Series A

Company

OffLimits

Arrive Outdoors

Heavy Sound Labs

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Amount

$2.3M

$4.75M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Co-Investors

Sources

2

5

1

10

10

Science Media Acquisitions

3 Acquisitions

Science Media acquired 3 companies. Their latest acquisition was PlayHaven on September 24, 2014.

Date

Investment Stage

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Total Funding

Note

Sources

9/24/2014

Debt

$99M

$32.8M

Acquired

1

5/8/2014

Series A

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

6/26/2012

Subscribe to see more

$99M

Subscribe to see more

0

Date

9/24/2014

5/8/2014

6/26/2012

Investment Stage

Debt

Series A

Companies

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Valuation

$99M

$99M

$99M

Total Funding

$32.8M

Note

Acquired

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Sources

1

10

0

Science Media Fund History

5 Fund Histories

Science Media has 5 funds, including Science Ventures Fund II.

Closing Date

Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

Sources

1/31/2018

Science Ventures Fund II

Early-Stage Venture Capital

Closed

$75M

5

11/22/2017

Science Blockchain Pte. Ltd.

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

$99M

10

7/13/2017

Science Partners 2017

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

$99M

10

7/20/2015

Science India Fund

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

$99M

10

Science Ventures Fund III LP

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

10

Closing Date

1/31/2018

11/22/2017

7/13/2017

7/20/2015

Fund

Science Ventures Fund II

Science Blockchain Pte. Ltd.

Science Partners 2017

Science India Fund

Science Ventures Fund III LP

Fund Type

Early-Stage Venture Capital

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Status

Closed

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Amount

$75M

$99M

$99M

$99M

Sources

5

10

10

10

10

Science Media Partners & Customers

1 Partners and customers

Science Media has 1 strategic partners and customers. Science Media recently partnered with Shuttle on January 1, 2018.

Date

Type

Business Partner

Country

News Snippet

Sources

1/16/2018

Partner

United States

1

Date

1/16/2018

Type

Partner

Business Partner

Country

United States

News Snippet

Sources

1

Science Media Service Providers

1 Service Provider

Science Media has 1 service provider relationship

Service Provider

Associated Rounds

Provider Type

Service Type

Counsel

General Counsel

Service Provider

Associated Rounds

Provider Type

Counsel

Service Type

General Counsel

Partnership data by VentureSource

Science Media Team

10 Team Members

Science Media has 10 team members, including current Founder, Managing Director, Thomas Dare.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

Thomas Dare

Fox Interactive Media, Tsavo Media, Los Angeles Times, and MySpace

Founder, Managing Director

Current

Greg Gilman

Founder, Managing Partner

Current

Michael Jones

Chief Executive Officer

Current

Ryan Eberhard

Chief Executive Officer

Former

Kartik Mandaville

Chief Technology Officer

Former

Name

Thomas Dare

Greg Gilman

Michael Jones

Ryan Eberhard

Kartik Mandaville

Work History

Fox Interactive Media, Tsavo Media, Los Angeles Times, and MySpace

Title

Founder, Managing Director

Founder, Managing Partner

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Technology Officer

Status

Current

Current

Current

Former

Former

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