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Angel Investor (Group)
lifescienceangels.com

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Investments

142

Portfolio Exits

22

Funds

1

About Life Science Angels

Life Science Angels, Inc. (LSA) is an angel investment group focused solely on biotechnology and medical device companies. Since 2005, LSA has invested $26.5 million in 30 companies which have received an additional $500+ million on follow-on funding from VCs.

Life Science Angels Headquarter Location

Palo Alto, California,

United States

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Latest Life Science Angels News

4D printing enables vascularization, bone tissue regeneration, spinal fusion

May 8, 2021

Hanjun Hwangbo, Hyeongjin Lee 4D printing enables vascularization, bone tissue regeneration, spinal fusion Researchers are working with 4D printing to create a biomimetic microchannel scaffold made of collagen and hydroxyapatite. Spinal fusion is frequently performed to restore spinal stability in patients with spinal diseases, such as spinal stenosis, vertebral fractures, progressive deformities, and instability. In the past two decades, there has been marked increase in the number of people over 65 years in age who have needed spinal fusion surgery. While autogenous bone grafts have long been considered the reference standard for spinal fusion, painful pseudoarthrosis remains a leading cause of poor clinical outcomes. Many researchers have consequently focused on trying to create a biomimetic scaffold that induces vascularization to enable bone tissue regeneration and spinal fusion. In Applied Physics Reviews , from AIP Publishing, researchers from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea present a solution to address the challenge of fabrication of a biomimetic scaffold. The team designed a microchannel scaffold made of a collagen and hydroxyapitite combination, with each strut consisting of micrometer-scaled microchannels. The microchannels have induced growth of blood vessels in a mouse model. "Since the fabrication of biomimetic scaffold is a challenging issue, the innovation of this study lies in adding extra hierarchy to the structure in the form of microchannels," says author Geun Hyung Kim. "This was achieved through a 4D printing strategy, where one-way shape morphing is used." The researchers printed immiscible polymer blends that act as a double negative template to fabricate the biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite hierarchical scaffold. They followed that by one-way shape morphing (4D printing) and coating processes. Collagen is known as a hydrophilic material, and numerous in vivo studies have suggested it possesses excellent cellular activities. In the case of the microchanneled collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, the researchers noted significantly higher water-absorbing capability, compared to a conventional collagen scaffold, because of the capillary pressure supplied by the microchannels. Consequently, the in vivo studies have suggested excellent infiltration of cells into microchannels. Going forward, the researchers will investigate enhancing the mechanical properties of the scaffold. Furthermore, controlling the mechanical properties of the scaffold would enable versatile applications of the microchanneled collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold. "I believe that the designed scaffold can have multiple applications with tubular structures such as muscle, tendon, and nerve," Kim says. Skeletal muscle is a hierarchical organization where the muscle fibers are encapsulated in microchannels known as endomysium. Therefore, the designed scaffold could act as endomysium to enable the infiltration of muscle fibers into the channels. Professor Arda Gozen looks to a future someday in which doctors can hit a button to print out a scaffold on their 3-D printers and create custom-made replacement skin, cartilage, or other tissue for their patients. Gozen, George and Joan Berry associate professor in the Washington State University School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering , and a team of researchers have developed a unique scaffolding material for engineered tissues that can be fine-tuned for the tricky business of growing natural tissue. They report on their research in the journal, Bioprinting. The team also includes researchers from WSU's Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering as well as from the University of Texas-San Antonio (UTSA), Morehouse College, and University of Rochester. The lead author is Mahmoud Amr, who received his PhD at UTSA. In recent decades, researchers have been working to use biological material in 3D printing to create tissue or organs for patients recovering from injury or disease. Using 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, makes it possible to print complex, porous, and personalized structures and could allow doctors someday to print out tissue for a patient's particular body and needs. To create biological structures, biological materials known as bioinks are dispensed out of a nozzle and deposited layer-by-layer, creating complex scaffolds for real biological material and providing a nice place for cells to grow. Nature, however, has so far been more complicated than researchers can keep up with. Real biological cells like to grow on a scaffold that approaches their own properties. So, for instance, a skin cell wants to grow on a scaffold that feels like skin while a muscle cell will only develop on a scaffold that feels like muscle. "The success of this method in manufacturing functional tissues relies heavily on how well the fabricated structures mimic the native tissues," Gozen says. "If you want to grow cells and turn them into functional tissue, you need to match the mechanical environment of the native tissue." The way that researchers have traditionally varied their scaffolds was to simply remove trusses to make them softer or stiffer – a method that is too simple to address all the needed complexity in tissue engineering. "We don't have a lot of knobs to turn," Gozen says. "You need more degrees of freedom – to create something softer or harder without changing the structure." The team of researchers developed a new bioink material that allows for customizing properties to closer approach what cells might need. The ingredients for their scaffold include gelatin, gum Arabic, and sodium alginate, which are all common thickening agents used in many processed foods. Similar to the way a thick rope is made of braided strands, the researchers used three separate chemical processes to tie their three ingredients together into one scaffold material for printing. Playing with the separate chemical processes then provides a way to finely tune the mechanical properties of the material, allowing them to make a softer or stiffer final scaffold. "That gives you the capability of tuning the properties without changing the scaffold design and gives you an additional degree of freedom that we are seeking," Gozen says. By adjusting the chemical bonds between the rope strands, they didn't change the material significantly, and it was amenable for growing cartilage cells. The work is still in its early stages, and the researchers would like to figure out how to more precisely tune the process and final material. They might look at varying the composition of their three materials or printing at different temperatures, for instance. Trying to imitate the vast complexity of natural tissue remains a challenge. Even a simple millimeter-sized piece of cartilage on the knee for instance, has three separate and distinct layers, each with different mechanical properties and functions. "You're not assembling Legos here. It's always about replicating nature that works with the body," Gozen said. "You can make living structures, but they look nothing like the native tissue. Precision is key because there is no single mechanical property target for a single piece of tissue." Brain implants are used to treat neurological dysfunction, and their use for enhancing cognitive abilities is a promising field of research. Implants can be used to monitor brain activity or stimulate parts of the brain using electrical pulses. In epilepsy, for example, brain implants can determine where in the brain seizures are happening. Over time, implants trigger a foreign body response, creating inflammation and scar tissue around the implant that reduces their effectiveness. The problem is that traditional implants are much more rigid than brain tissue, which has a softness comparable to pudding. Stress between the implant and the tissue caused by constant movement of the brain with respect to the implant signals the body to treat the implant as a foreign object. This interaction between the implant and the brain is similar to a knife cutting into a piece of pudding. An implant as soft as brain tissue would be ideal, but such soft implants would be difficult to manufacture and implant on the microscale. By using silicone polymers, widely known for their medical applications, the scientists were able to make the softest brain implant to date with the thickness of a thin sewing thread (~0.2mm), and the consistency of soft pudding – as soft as the brain itself. They were then able to implant it into the brain using a trick from the cookbook. They adopted classical cooking techniques of sugar melting, caramelizing, and molding both for making the implant, as well as for encapsulating it into a needle made of hardened sugar. When surgically inserted into the brain of an anesthetized rat, the sugar needle carried the implant to the right location, and dissolved within seconds, leaving the delicate implant in place. Sugar is non-toxic and is naturally metabolized by the brain. Examining brain tissue three and nine weeks after implantation, the team found higher neuronal density and lower foreign body response compared to traditional implants. While more research is needed to develop electrically active, soft implants, and to prove the safety and effectiveness of the technique in humans, one day it could be used to unlock the potential of brain implants in treating neurological disease and dysfunction. "The implants we created are so soft that the body doesn't see it as a big threat, allowing them to interact with the brain with less interference," says Edward Zhang, the study's first author. "I am excited about the future of brain implant technology and believe our work helps pave the path for a new generation of soft implants that could make brain implants a more viable medical treatment." "By reducing the brains inflammatory response, our new, very soft implants are a good thing for the brain and a good thing for the long-term function of an implant," says Tim Kennedy, a researcher at The Neuro and the study's co-senior author. "The miniature sugar needle devised by Zhang is a sweet solution to placing the super-soft implant into equally soft brain tissue." "Biomedical engineering research is about making the impossible, possible," says David Juncker, a professor of biomedical engineering at McGill and the study's co-senior author. "Here we set out to make an implant as soft as the brain and implant it into the brain, which was a major challenge. We are excited about the results, and the possibility it opens up for long lasting, well-tolerated brain implants.” In addition to measuring heart rate and full body composition, Withings’ Body Cardio scale will now feature a new cardiovascular index – Vascular Age – providing a daily, easy-to-understand assessment of arterial health. It accomplishes this by showing people how their cardiovascular health compares to the norms expected within their age bracket, with an estimate of their inner heart age and an indication of whether it is optimum, normal, or not optimum for their chronological age. With the Vascular Age, Withings has created an instantly recognizable index to help users better understand their health and maintain or change behavior to live a healthy lifestyle. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, taking about 655,000 American lives annually according to CDC statistics. According to the WHO, cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death on a global scale, impacting an estimated 17.9 million lives per year. With cardiovascular diseases taking so many lives each year, the ability to monitor heart health from home with medical-grade insights is imperative. Editor’s note: I was offered the opportunity to try the new Withings Body Cardio scale, so I accepted. While I won’t be sharing my weight gains or losses, I will be circling back around with updates ease of use, convenience of the connection to the phone, and more. I’m looking forward to testing it but I’m not sure I want to know the answers to vascular age and more! Determining vascular age Vascular Age is based on Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), a measurement of arterial stiffness that is a key indicator of cardiac health. It’s widely used in clinical settings to provide early warnings of associated risks of cardiac and health incidents such as hypertension, high cholesterol, organ failure, reduced cognitive function, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and heart attack. It’s the speed at which the blood pressure pulse propagates through the circulatory system. To determine PWV, Body Cardio measures the time difference between blood ejection by the heart in the aorta and the arrival of blood flow in the feet using ballistocardiography and impedance plethysmography technologies. When the heart beats, it exerts a force that leads to weight variations on the Body Cardio. A change in the body’s electrical current can be detected by the scale when this blood flow reaches the feet allowing PWV to be calculated. Introduced in 2016 and with more than 80 million readings, Withings has one of the largest PWV databases in the world, which against multiple scientific papers has shown to be highly representative against the general population. To determine Vascular Age, Withings’ algorithm analyzes a person’s PWV measurement against the norms for their age and physical characteristics and is expressed both as an actual age (± range against chronological range) and as an indication of whether a person is optimal, normal, or sub-optimal. The algorithm was developed by leading cardiologist, Prof. Stéphane Laurent of Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou with reference to the latest clinical literature. Importance of vascular age Usually, arteries age more slowly than the rest of the body. However, they can age faster when constantly aggravated by items such as cigarette smoke and foods laden with saturated and trans fats. If vascular age is determined to be significantly greater than a person’s chronological age, they may be more at risk of developing cardiovascular issues later in life. Vascular age is a metric recognized by the scientific community and often used as a wellness tool. The Withings Vascular Age feature provides cardiovascular check-ups in less than 30 seconds in a metric that is easy to understand, put into perspective, and tracked over time. The scale will conveniently show a person if they are optimum, normal, or not optimum on its screen, while the Withings Health Mate app will show additional information including an estimation of their vascular age as well as exercise and nutrition advice to improve cardiovascular health. “Body Cardio redefines how people use connected scales by providing them with a tool to manage their weight as well as their cardiovascular health,” says Mathieu Letombe, Withings CEO. “By simply stepping on their scale each morning, Body Cardio will provide the type of cardiovascular assessment people normally only receive at a doctor’s office. By linking the information to age, an index everyone understands, we are making it easy for people to stay informed and motivated to make healthy choices.” Smartest of Smart Scales Body Cardio is packed with features to help people achieve their weight loss and maintenance goals. In addition to weight and BMI readings, Body Cardio also provides a full assessment of body composition. Using a scientific technique called Bioelectrical impedance, it computes the body's percentage of fat, muscle, water, and bone mass. It’s also able to take a user’s heart rate. To encourage daily use, a proven strategy to improve weight loss, Body Cardio is full of features to promote engagement. These fully customizable features include graphs showing the user’s weight trends over time, their step count from the previous day, and even the morning’s weather report so they can choose an outfit for the day. The Withings Body Cardio can sync via Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Its additional advanced features include its rechargeable battery with up to 1-year battery life and ability to automatically recognize up to 8 users in a family. Whether you’re a lifesciences, healthcare, or medtech startup seeking capital and exposure, or an investor seeking new deals, Venture Summit \ Virtual Connect [Global] presented by youngStartup Ventures, is the event of the year you won't want to miss. This event is featuring a dedicated Lifesciences Healthcare and MedTech Tracks. Taking place July 6-8, 2021, this exclusive program is dedicated to showcasing early-stage VCs, Corporate VCs and angel investors (see below*) committed to funding venture backed, emerging and early-stage Lifesciences, Healthcare and MedTech companies as well as showcasing over 100 Top Innovators. Special offer Today’s Medical Developments has made special arrangement for our network to receive a special discount of 20% off the existing “early bird" savings . This conference will be attended by the best people in the industry. Please register early to avoid disappointment. Register today & save Click here . (Use promo code "TMDVIP”) In addition to providing access to leading Investors, the conference will feature more than 100 pre-screened venture backed, emerging and early-stage companies seeking capital, and hardcore networking. Call for TOP INNOVATORS! Get Noticed > Get Funded > Grow Faster A select group of more than 100 Top Innovators will be chosen to present their breakthrough investment opportunities to an exclusive audience of Venture Capitalists, Corporate Investors, Private Investors, Investment Bankers, and Strategic Partners. Apply to present / Nominate a company For more information or to be considered for one of the Top Innovator slots click here . Seed Pitchfest If you are a seed stage company seeking angel funding of less than $1M (and have raised less than $300,000) click here to apply for the Seed stage track. We look forward to seeing you there. Today’s Medical Developments & youngStartup Ventures *Partial list of over 250 featured VCs and Angel Investors from the recent summit included: Bozena Adamczyk, Investment Director, Truffle Capital | Coleman Adams, Partner, CEVG | Susan Akbarpour, Managing Partner, Candou Ventures | Dan Altschuler Malek, Managing Partner, Unovis Asset Management | Nick Arnold, Associate, HG Ventures | Doug Atkin, Co-Founder, Managing Partner, Communitas Capital Partners | Salman Azhar, Founding Partner & Managing Director, Azhar Private Equity | Amolak Badesha, CEO / Investor, Sand Hill Angels | Sion Balass, Partner, The Group Ventures | Deb Bardhan, Investor, Wharton Alumni Angels | Assaf Barnea, CEO, Sanara Ventures | Hasan Basrai, Associate, Information Venture Partners | Josh Beck, Chief Investment Officer, BCI Technology Investments | Randy Berholtz, Investor Judge, Mesa Verde Venture Partners | Rishi Bhakar, Vice President, Energy Innovation Investments, Tenaska | Reetika Bhardwaj, Associate, ARCH Venture Partners | Udit Bhatnagar, Vice President, McRock Capital | Jason Blumberg, CEO/Managing Partner, Energy Foundry | Christopher Booker, Partner, Frist Cressey Ventures | Noreen Brar, Associate, Plug & Play Ventures | Alice Brooks, Principal, Khosla Ventures | Alex Brufsky, Venture Partner, 1435 Capital | Antony Brydon, Co-Founder, Directly | Pratik Budhdev, Global Investment Director, Volvo Cars Tech Fund | Edouard Bulteau, Principal, Total Carbon Neutrality Ventures | Dan Burstein, Managing Partner, Millennium Technology Value Partners | Peter Campitiello, Partner, McCarter & English, LLP | James Carroll, Managing Partner, CC Angel Investments | Adam Carson, Operating Partner, Point72 Ventures | Kathryn Cartini, Co-founder / Partner, Chloe Capital | Andre Chabaneix, Associate, Blue Bear Capital | Kookai Chaimahawong, Associate, Pangaea Ventures | Iris Chan, Partner, Mighty Capital | Ray Chan, Managing Director, K5 Ventures | Jonathan Charles, Director, Samsung Catalyst Fund | Kevin Chen, Partner, Lam Capital | Sarah Chen, Co-Founder & Managing Partner, Beyond The Billion | Elizabeth Cho-Fertikh, Co-Founder & Managing Director, MEDA Angels | Ryan Chou, Investment Associate, JetBlue Technology Ventures | Diana Ciobanete, Program Director, Commons Accel | Andrew Clapp, Managing Partner, Brightside Venture Capital | Conor Clifford, Principal, Future Energy Ventures | Jillian Cohn, Partner, Mouro Capital | Xiaolei Cong, Vice President, Citi Ventures | Dan Conley, Active Angel, NJAngels | Gerald Cook, Business Development, Japan External Trade Organization | Darren Cooke, Investor and Board Member, Life Science Angels | Amy Coveny, Managing Partner, Quake Capital | Richard Curtin, VP Business Operations, Silicon Catalyst Angels | Rick Cutright, Technology Principal, OGCI Climate Investments | Joe Darcy, Principal, IDEA Fund Partners | Elias Davis, Investor, Kli Capital | Timur Davis, Principal, Munich Re Ventures | Marcia Dawood, Venture Partner, Mindshift Capital | Angelo Del Priore, Partner, HP Tech Ventures | Jun Deng, Investment Partner, Joyance Partners | Eric Desai, Partner, Greenhouse Capital Partners | Philip Deutch, Partner, NGP ETP | Dixon Doll, Co-Founder & Partner Emeritus, DCM Ventures | Francesco Draetta, Principal, Omega Funds | Lara Druyan, Managing Director, Silicon Valley Data Capital | Max Duckworth, Co-founder, MaSa Partners | Vikki Dunn, Operating Partner, Energy Innovation Capital | Amy Dyck, Associate, Framework Venture Partners | Sara Enan, Investment Associate, Global Ventures | Michelle Fan, Founder, Wharton Alumni Angel Network | Chenoa Farnsworth, Managing Partner, Blue Startups | Andrew Felbinger, Investor, Urban Innovation Fund | Manny Fernandez, Angel Investor, SF Angels Group | Mark Fields, Partner, Alsop Louie Partners | Christian Frey, Data Analyst, Link Ventures | Carolin Funk, Investment Director, Blue Bear Capital | Tarik Galijasevic, Managing Director, Allstate Strategic Ventures | Elena Gantvarg, Principal, Flint Capital | Cathy Gao, Partner, Sapphire Ventures | Chris Garabedian, CEO, Xontogeny | Daisy Garcia, Investment Analyst, JetBlue Technology Ventures | Joe Garcia, Venture Fellow, Rethink Impact | Selma Gasc, Investment Analyst, 360 Capital | Olivia Gaudree, Partner and Core Analyst, Fuel Venture Capital | Ryan George, Investor/Data Scientist, Tribe Capital | Gary Gershony, Founding General Partner, BayMed Venture Partners | Shmuel Gniwisch, Managing Partner/Co-founder, Kli Capital | David Goldberg, General Partner, Alpaca VC | Garrett Goldberg, Partner, Bee Partners | Lizzy Goldman, Investment Analyst, Olive Tree Ventures | Emi Gonzalez, Senior Principal, Social Starts | Joseph Goodman, Managing Partner, VoLo Earth Ventures | Jay Goss, General Partner, Wavemaker Three-Sixty Health | Michelle Gouveia, Associate, Sandbox Insurtech Ventures | Mark Grace, Investor, M13 | Edward Greer, Corporate Technology Scout, Dow Ventures | Karin Gregory, Managing Partner, Blue Highway Capital | John Gu, Principal, Spring Mountain Capital | Deepak Gupta, Managing Partner, Blue Bear Ventures | Chris Hagenbuch, Special Counsel, Troutman Pepper, LLP | Katie Hayes, Director, Wittington Ventures | Yashwanth Hemaraj, Partner, Benhamou Global Ventures | Amy Henry, CEO, Eunike Ventures | Robert Hess, Angel Investor, Life Science Angels | Krisztina ‘Z’ Holly, Venture Partner, Good Growth Capital | David Hornik, Partner, Lobby Capital | Galit Horovitz, Co-founder, Welltech1 | Justine Humenansky, Investor, Playground Global | Conor Hunt, Principal, 1435 Capital | Ander Iruretagoyena, Senior Associate, Impact Engine | Anastasia Istratova, Investor, 40 North Ventures | Noel Jee, Principal, Illumina Ventures | Ben Jen, Managing Director, Ben Jen Holdings | Kathleen Jurman, Tech Scout Corporate Ventures, Dow Ventures | Byron Kalogerou, Partner, McDermott Will & Emery, LLP | Denis Kalyshkin, Principal, I2BF Global Ventures | Sidney Kanell, Associate, Catalyst Investors | Shoman Kasbekar, Associate, Foresite Capital | Tomas Kemtys, Partner, Contrarian Ventures | Hunter Kettering, VC, Red Cedar Ventures | Najib Khouri-Haddad, General Partner, Sway Ventures | Nadav Klein, Principal, EIR, Triventures | Howard Ko, Principal, Morpheus Ventures | Lasse Kohler, Senior Associate, Maersk Growth | Eric Kohlmann, Principal, Arc Ventures | David Kunz, Managing Principal - General Partner, Hall Venture Partners | Noah Lack, Analyst, AiSprouts VC | John-Paul Lake, Managing Partner, Kern Venture Group | Rachel Lauren, Analyst, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments | Randall LaVeau, Partner, BOSS Capital Partners | Donna LaVoie, President & CEO, LaVoieHealthScience | James Lee, Investment Director, Photonfund | Roberta Lee, Co-Chair Life Science Committee, Keiretsu Forum | Sarah Leners, Senior Associate, Bull City Venture Partners | Alicia Lenis, Vice President, Chrysalix Venture Capital | Adam Levinson, Associate, Millennium | Todd Lewis, VP, Prologis Ventures, Prologis Ventures | Ephraim Lindenbaum, Managing Director, Advance Ventures | Charles Ling, Investment Director, Tsingyuan Ventures | Brian Litvak, Market Development, Aster Capital | Jim Lockheed, Principal, JetBlue Technology Ventures | Steven London, Partner, Troutman Pepper, LLP | Patrick Lord, Partner - Fintech, Truffle Capital | Edwin Loredo, VP, Core Innovation Capital | Vincent Lui, Sr. Director Corporate Ventures, SK Telecom Ventures | Josh Lumer, Investor, Allstate Strategic Ventures | Megan MacDonagh, Associate, SV Health Investors | Aly Madhavji, Managing Partner, Blockchain Founders Fund | Shailendra Mahajan, Managing Director, Maxim Ventures | Tai Mai, Investment Fellow, MEDA Angels | Jaione Maiz, Principal, Anzu Partners | Shervin Majd, Angel Investor, Life Science Angels | Radhika Malik, Investment Manager, Samsung Catalyst Fund | Brian Malkin, Partner, McDermott Will & Emery, LLP | Alex Mayall, Associate, Anthemis Group | Andrew McClure, Principal, ForgePoint Capital | Melissa McCracken, Principal, Nextech Invest | Andrew Meadow, General Partner, Health Innovation Capital | Aashna Mehra, Associate, New Energy Capital Partners | Maulik Mehta, Investor, Arc Ventures | David Mendez, Managing Partner, Good Growth Capital | Laurie Menoud, Partner, At One Ventures | Pedro Mesquita, Investment Analyst, Mindset Ventures | Mark Mihanovic, Partner, McDermott Will & Emery, LLP | Kay Min, Senior Director, Cisco Investments | Khash Mohajerani, Director, BWE LLP | Yasmine Morrison, Investor, Antler Global | Matt Murphy, Partner, Montage Ventures | Olivia Musmanno, Senior Associate, Quake Capital | Kenneth Ng, Managing Director, Thessalus Capital | Mitchell Ng, Managing Partner, Thessalus Capital | Gal Noyman Veksler, Principal, LionBird | Matthew O’Rourke, Principal, WindSail Capital Group | Molly O’Shea, Investor, NYL Ventures | Gilbert Ohana, Managing Partner, FinTLV Ventures | Shamik Parekh, Investment Associate, Octopus Ventures | Hirak Parikh, Fund Manager, Michigan Biomedical Venture Fund | Chris Park, Investment Director, UL Ventures | John Parker, Managing Director, Springhood Ventures | Robert Parker, Principal - CleanTech, S CAP | Jean-Marc Patouillaud, Managing Partner, Partech | Michael Peri, Senior Vice President, NFP Ventures | Sophie Phillips, Analyst, Aisling Capital | Daniel Pianko, Managing Director, Achieve Partners | Richard Pivnicka, Deal Leader, Band of Angels | Patricia Poon, Director, Belmond Capital | Robert Poor, Advisor, Good Growth Capital | Mary Jo Potter, Managing Director, Healthcare Angels | Ulrich Quay, Managing Partner, BMW i Ventures | Gayathri Radhakrishnan, Director VC, Micron Ventures | Suraj Rajwani, Managing Partner, DoubleRock LLC | Mark Ralph, Executive Director, Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund | Krish Ramadurai, Partner, Harmonix Fund | Ashley Ramirez, Chief of Staff and Investor, Halogen Ventures | Estie Rand, Founder, Strand Consulting | Marie-Christine Razaire, Associate, Northwestern Mutual Future Ventures | Julia Reichelstein, Investor, Piva Capital | John Ricci, Managing Director, US ANGELS | Dave Roberson, CEO, RoseRyan | John Robinson, Partner, Mazarine Ventures | Carolina Rojas, Ventures Analyst, NFP Ventures | Stephen Roland, Associate, Swiftarc Ventures | Alexander Ross, Investment Director, Illuminate Financial | Joseph Rothman, Venture Partner, AlphaPrime Ventures | Roger Royse, Partner, Haynes and Boone LLP | Alexander Rozenfeld, Managing Director, Climate Impact Capital | Vincent Ruinet, Investment Director, ENGIE New Ventures | Igor Ryabenkiy, Managing Partner, AltaIR Capital | Abinav Sankar, Partner, Sopris Capital | Stephanie Sarelakos, VP, Investments, The Venture Collective | Massimo Schäppi, Partner, Tomahawk .VC | Mark Schneider, Chairman, New York Angels | Marc Schröder, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, MGV | Reese Schroeder, Investor, Allstate Strategic Ventures | Brian Schuman, Investment Professional, PepsiCo Technology Ventures | Shahram Seyedin-Noor, Founder + General Partner, Civilization Ventures | Simon Sharp, Principal, Global Ventures | Greg Shepard, Partner, BOSS Capital Partners | Arina Shulga, Partner, McCarter & English, LLP | Charles Sidman, Managing Partner, ECS Capital Partners | Ratan Singh, Partner, Fort Ross Ventures | Shounok Sinha, Principal, Venture Investing, Constellation Technology Ventures | Michelle Snyder, Partner, McKesson Ventures | Vivek Soni, Venture Partner, S CAP CleanTech | Peter Sopher, Manager, Clean Energy Ventures | David Sorin, Partner, McCarter & English, LLP | Jared Sorin, Partner, McCarter & English, LLP | Kumar Sripadam, GP, Elevate Capital | Anish Srivastava, Founder & CEO, Vinaj Ventures | Alexander Starchenko, Managing Partner, First Imagine! Ventures | Isaac Stoner, Co-founder and CEO, Octagon Therapeutics | Nancy Sullivan, CEO and Managing Director, Illinois Ventures | Suman Talukdar, Founder & MD, AiSprouts VC | Daniel Teo, Managing Partner, Hunniwell Lake Ventures | Byron Thom, Principal, Framework Venture Partners | Abhinav Tiwari, General Partner, Owl Capital | Matthew Uretsky, Partner, McCarter & English, LLP | Erica Van, Investor, CRV [Charles River Ventures] | Jennifer Vancini, General Partner, Mighty Capital | Joe Vasquez, Venture Partner, Revel Partners | Alejandra Vergara, Summer Associate, Bee Partners | Mark Vreeke, Founder, Chemical Angel Network | Jordan Wahbeh, Managing Partner, SV Venture Group | Brian Walsh, Head, WIND Ventures | Tobi Walter, Principal, Cofounders Capital | Isaiah Washington, Analyst, Insight Partners | Kyoko Watanabe, Managing Director, DEFTA Partners | Lauren Weston, Associate, Thomvest Ventures | Ali Willet, Investment, Lime Rock New Energy | Zed Williamson, CEO, TrackableMed | Sarah Wolter, Principal, FinTech Collective | Minjia Wu, Principal, SOSV | Yating Xia, Investor, TCL | Steve Yaskin, Venture Partner, Scale Up Ventures | Pamela York, Co-founder / Managing Partner, Capita3 | Juan Zavala, Principal, New Markets Venture Partners | Stephanie Zepeda, Principal, Arbor Ventures | Lu Zhang, Founder & Managing Partner, Fusion Fund | Fen Zhao, Head of Data Science and Venture Investor, Alpha Edison | Yanan Zhao, Partner, Magnet Ventures | Chen Zhou, Investor, Samsung Catalyst Fund | Tony Zhu, Venture Associate, Clean Energy Trust | Anthony Zlaket, Venture Capital Investor, UnityPoint Health Ventures and many more...

Life Science Angels Investments

142 Investments

Life Science Angels has made 142 investments. Their latest investment was in Strategikon Pharma as part of their Series A on April 4, 2021.

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Life Science Angels Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

4/22/2021

Series A

Strategikon Pharma

Yes

1

12/10/2020

Series A

Astrocyte Pharmaceuticals

$6M

Yes

2

8/28/2020

Unattributed

Watchmaker Genomics

$8.27M

Yes

3

1/16/2019

Series A - II

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$99M

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10

7/19/2018

Series A

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$99M

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10

Date

4/22/2021

12/10/2020

8/28/2020

1/16/2019

7/19/2018

Round

Series A

Series A

Unattributed

Series A - II

Series A

Company

Strategikon Pharma

Astrocyte Pharmaceuticals

Watchmaker Genomics

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Amount

$6M

$8.27M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

Yes

Yes

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Co-Investors

Sources

1

2

3

10

10

Life Science Angels Portfolio Exits

22 Portfolio Exits

Life Science Angels has 22 portfolio exits. Their latest portfolio exit was Amplyx Pharmaceuticals on April 28, 2021.

Date

Exit

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Acquirer

Sources

4/28/2021

Acquired

8

8/13/2019

Acquired

1

8/2/2019

Acquired

$991

3

00/00/0000

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10

00/00/0000

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Subscribe to see more

10

Date

4/28/2021

8/13/2019

8/2/2019

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Exit

Acquired

Acquired

Acquired

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Companies

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Valuation

$991

Acquirer

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Sources

8

1

3

10

10

Life Science Angels Fund History

1 Fund History

Life Science Angels has 1 fund, including Life Science Angels Side Fund.

Closing Date

Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

Sources

6/14/2006

Life Science Angels Side Fund

Early-Stage Venture Capital

$1M

1

Closing Date

6/14/2006

Fund

Life Science Angels Side Fund

Fund Type

Early-Stage Venture Capital

Status

Amount

$1M

Sources

1

Life Science Angels Team

4 Team Members

Life Science Angels has 4 team members, including current President, Gregory W Scott.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

Allan W. May

Emergent Medical Partners

Founder

Current

Gregory W Scott

President

Current

Donald G Ross

HealthTech Capital, and ARK Diagnostics

Managing Partner

Current

Ann Gaddy

Managing Director

Former

Name

Allan W. May

Gregory W Scott

Donald G Ross

Ann Gaddy

Work History

Emergent Medical Partners

HealthTech Capital, and ARK Diagnostics

Title

Founder

President

Managing Partner

Managing Director

Status

Current

Current

Current

Former

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