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Government
BUSINESS PRODUCTS & SERVICES | Consulting & Outsourcing / Management & Strategy Consulting
innovation.ca

Investments

5

Funds

1

About Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation helps Canadian researchers and entrepreneurs through investment and facilities to drive innovation.

Headquarters Location

Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 6L5,

Canada

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Latest Canada Foundation for Innovation News

Ottawa clamps down on university research partnerships with China, Iran and Russia

Jan 16, 2024

Ottawa clamps down on university research partnerships with China, Iran and Russia The federal government has unveiled strict new national-security rules to protect cutting-edge science and advanced technology from ending up in the hands of China, Russia and Iran. The long-promised package of reforms would ban federal granting agencies and the Canada Foundation for Innovation [CFI] from funding sensitive technology research at any university, laboratory and research institution if they are co-operating with military, national defence or state security bodies of countries that could pose a risk to Canada’s national security. The government published a list of sensitive technology research that includes artificial intelligence, quantum science, robotics and autonomous systems, biotechnology, advanced weapons, advanced sensing and surveillance, digital infrastructure, advanced energy, space and satellite and human machine integration. Ottawa also published a list of Chinese, Iranian and Russian research organizations of which Canadian researchers should steer clear. They include nearly 90 Chinese organizations, including the National University of Defence Technologies and the Academy of Military Science, 11 Iranian institutions, including the Imam Hossein University of the Revolutionary Guards, and six Russian institutes. “Research grant and funding applications submitted to the federal granting councils and the CFI that fall within research that advances a sensitive technology research area will not be funded if any of the researchers involved in activities supported by the grant are affiliated with, or in receipt of funding or in-kind support from, a university, research institute or laboratory connected to military, national defence or state security entities that pose a risk to Canada’s national security,” Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne said in a statement. Mr. Champagne promised new national-security rules last year after The Globe and Mail reported that Canadian universities had for years collaborated with a top Chinese army scientific institution on hundreds of advanced-technology research projects, generating knowledge that can help drive China’s defence sector in cutting-edge, high-tech industries. Researchers at 50 Canadian universities, including the University of Waterloo, University of Toronto, University of British Columbia and McGill University, conducted and published joint scientific papers from 2005 to 2022 with scientists connected to China’s military, according to research provided to The Globe and Mail by U.S. strategic intelligence company Strider Technologies Inc. Strider found that in the past five years, academics at 10 of Canada’s leading universities published more than 240 joint papers on topics including quantum cryptography, photonics and space science with Chinese military scientists at the National University of Defence Technology (NUDT). Some of these NUDT researchers are experts in missile performance and guidance systems, mobile robotics and automated surveillance. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) has warned that Beijing is increasingly using joint academic research programs to obtain innovative science and technology for economic and military advantage. NUDT was blacklisted by the United States in 2015 – subject to export restrictions – under former U.S. president Barack Obama’s administration because Washington believes it “is involved, or poses a significant risk of being or becoming involved in activities that are contrary to the national-security or foreign-policy interests of the United States.” NUDT reports to the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Military Commission and has been lauded by President Xi Jinping as a “highland for training high-quality new military personnel and for independent innovation in national defence technology.” After The Globe report, Mr. Champagne announced in February that he had instructed the Canada Foundation for Innovation and federal research granting councils to screen funding requests from Canadian universities that are collaborating on sensitive research with China and other states. Those granting agencies include the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, as well as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He also vowed to bring in new national-security rules for Canadian universities and research institutions to ensure their work is not transferred to China and other hostile states. In his statement Tuesday, Mr. Champagne said the new policy rules will come into effect in spring of 2024 but he warned the government “may immediately take research affiliation into account as part of research funding decision-making, should risks be identified.” “We encourage researchers and institutions to continue to exercise due diligence in all of their research partnerships,” he added. Rebecca Elming, a spokesperson for the University of Waterloo, said the university will seek to implement the new rules but expects help and guidance from the government. “We note that these restrictions have affected researchers and global research and will continue to do so. It is crucial that our government takes steps to ensure that researchers are able to advance their work in this new environment to ensure that we make the most of their creativity for Canada’s prosperity,” Ms. Elming said in a statement.

Canada Foundation for Innovation Investments

5 Investments

Canada Foundation for Innovation has made 5 investments. Their latest investment was in GlycoNet as part of their Grant on August 22, 2022.

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Canada Foundation for Innovation Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

8/22/2022

Grant

GlycoNet

$8.23M

Yes

1

8/19/2022

Grant

Subscribe to see more

$99M

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10

7/13/2021

Grant - II

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$99M

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10

7/23/2020

Grant

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$99M

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10

5/28/2020

Grant

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$99M

Subscribe to see more

10

Date

8/22/2022

8/19/2022

7/13/2021

7/23/2020

5/28/2020

Round

Grant

Grant

Grant - II

Grant

Grant

Company

GlycoNet

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Amount

$8.23M

$99M

$99M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Co-Investors

Sources

1

10

10

10

10

Canada Foundation for Innovation Fund History

1 Fund History

Canada Foundation for Innovation has 1 fund, including Major Science Initiatives Fund.

Closing Date

Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

Sources

Major Science Initiatives Fund

$230M

1

Closing Date

Fund

Major Science Initiatives Fund

Fund Type

Status

Amount

$230M

Sources

1

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