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About Brilex Industries

Brilex Industries specializes in engineering, fabricating, machining, assembly and equipment rebuilding.

Brilex Industries Headquarters Location

1201 Crescent Street

Youngstown, Ohio, 44502,

United States

330-744-1114

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Latest Brilex Industries News

Brilex Group adds former Nucor VP

Apr 30, 2021

Brilex Group adds former Nucor VP Ohio equipment and technology firm hires former Nucor executive Doyle Hopper as its new CEO. The Youngstown, Ohio-based Brilex Group of Companies has announced the hiring of former Nucor executive Doyle Hopper as the new CEO of Brilex Industries Inc, Brilex Technical Solutions LLC and Taylor-Winfield Technologies Inc. “We are thrilled to have Doyle take the reins as CEO,” says Alex Benyo, co-founder of the Brilex Group. “Doyle’s role will drive integration and synergies between our companies, maximizing the value delivered to our customers and will lead to additional opportunities in the marketplace.” Says Brian Benyo, co-founder of the Brilex Group, of Hopper, “His values and proven leadership combined with his knowledge of the steelmaking and automated manufacturing processes align perfectly with our group’s values, growth strategies and industries served.” Hopper has nearly 30 years of steel industry and manufacturing experience. Before joining the Brilex Group, he spent his nearly all his career with Charlotte, North Carolina-based Nucor Corp., the largest producer of steel in the United States. Starting with Nucor out of college as an entry-level welder and fabricator, Hopper continually advanced into expanded roles, eventually reaching executive positions as a vice president in Nebraska, Connecticut and, most recently, South Carolina. “I am thankful for the past three decades I have spent with Nucor,” says Hopper. “The experiences and insights I gained into the ongoing evolution of steelmaking and manufacturing have prepared me for the exciting opportunities in the marketplace for the companies within The Brilex Group. I am honored to be joining these organizations that have earned their reputations for excellence in engineering and manufacturing innovation.” Brilex Technical Solutions engineers heavy material handling systems, scrap shredders , aluminum extrusion press components and upgrades, plus turntable designs for marine cable laying, commercial vehicles, revolving restaurants and other applications. Brilex Industries specializes in build-to-print services requiring fabrication, machining, assembly, rebuilds and roll forming. Taylor-Winfield Technologies is a custom automation and robotics systems provider. Gary Cohn spent two decades working for Goldman Sachs before joining the Donald Trump White House, allowing him to see how power can be used within both the private and public sectors. In an interview conducted as part of the ISRI2012 online convention, he said to recyclers, “I hope the government creates an environment that incentivizes you all to make major investments in your businesses.” Cohn was interviewed by Gary Champlin, current chair of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), who also owns Champlin Tire Recycling of Concordia, Kansas. Before rising through the ranks of Goldman Sachs, Cohn said he worked for his father’s electrical contracting business in Cleveland, where he quickly learned about the value of copper scrap by watching electricians and warehouse workers debate over who would receive the return on scrapped items. In New York, Cohn contributed to building up the commodities business of Goldman Sachs. Alluding to the intricate supply and demand balance of the commodities processed and traded by ISRI members, Cohn remarked, “If you ever want to learn about a fundamental market, just look at the commodities” The former banker, trader and White House adviser, who now serves as a vice chair with Armonk, New York-based IBM, said the notion of commodities heading for a second “super cycle” is not out of the question. “Renewed interest in infrastructure, if this all goes forward as we think it may, is going to [create] enormous demand  for commodities, which will put us into a super cycle.” Of his White House days, Cohn confirmed that the Trump economic team often was divided between those highly supportive of tariffs and those (like him) who wanted to be much more selective in their use. While not an avid protectionist himself, Cohn did state, “The state-owned enterprises in China subsidize their companies, their cost of capital is low, their environmental protections are low—none of that stuff is false.” He added, though, “If someone else can produce a good or a service cheaper than we can, it’s actually beneficial for our economy to import that good or service. [Then], our American citizens will buy that good or service at a cheaper price point, and they’ll have more disposable income to buy what we produce domestically.” (This includes services and entertainment, he commented.) Cohn said despite the many changes introduced by Joe Biden in his first 100 days, very few of them have involved rolling back tariffs. “It feels to me the Biden administration is going to be very similar [in its actions toward China] as the Trump Administration,” he remarked. “They’re just going to do it very quietly; they’re not going to talk about it or rabble-rouse about it.” Although infrastructure appears to provide an arena where the Biden administration can introduce even more metals demand into the economy, Cohn expressed caution about the impact of such legislation. Beyond the issue of “how to pay for it,” said Cohn, is a decades-old divide on permits for bigger projects. “The federal government owns the permitting process, but states and cities own the infrastructure. It’s not a mutual alignment of interests,” he remarked. Cohn defended the Trump 2017 tax plan—saying it was far from a flat-out “tax cut for the rich” as portrayed by Democrats—and urged those in power to create or maintain “a tax policy that encourages investment, because investment creates jobs and job opportunities.” Coming out of the pandemic, Cohn said the abrupt shifts in behavior benefitted the nation’s largest companies at the expense of many small business owners. “The biggest issue we have in the United States is the re-creation of small business. We need to bring back the ones that got wiped out during the pandemic.” Before Cohn’s interview, ISRI recognized its two Lifetime Achievement Award winners for 2021: David Borsuk  of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin-based Sadoff Iron & Metal, and Shelley Padnos  of Holland, MIchigan-based Padnos. Padnos thanked her family and colleagues and noted she was the first and remains the only national ISRI officer, calling it a situation “I hope we can change; we have barely managed to crack that glass ceiling.” She said to fellow ISRI members, “Think about your teams and look closely at them. Please make a conscious effort [to diversify]. This kind of change will only happen with conscious effort.” Padnos pointed to current ISRI President Robin Weiner as an example of the good that can arise. Borsuk thanked his “entire ISRI family” and his “work family at Sadoff Iron & Metal.” He recounted attending the first ISRI Safety Summit and said he came away retaining as his credo that “priorities change; values don’t, and safety is a value we all must hold.” As we slowly emerge from the pandemic, aluminum markets have rebounded from this time last year, with signs of further recovery on the horizon, said Lauren Wilk, vice president, government relations & international programs, with the Aluminum Association , Arlington, Virginia. Wilk was joined by Reuters columnist Andy Home during the ISRI2021 Aluminum Spotlight: A Better Year for Aluminum Markets?, which was April 28. ISRI2021, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries ( ISRI ) annual convention and exposition, was held virtually April 20-22 and April 27-29. Home said China’s primary aluminum capacity stood at less than 3 million metric tons in 2000. But, by the end of 2020, the country’s production grew to 37.3 million metric tons, which was 57 percent of global aluminum production. The country’s semifabricated aluminum imports also surged during that time from 27,000 metric tons in 2004 to 4.6 million metric tons in 2020. “I would suggest that this has really shaped the political landscape around our industry,” Home said. “Without an international agreement on what to do with China, it’s no surprise that we have seen a proliferation of trade barriers being erected.” Home said the U.S. was no longer trying to stem the flow of Chinese material but the flow of material from other countries that has been displaced by Chinese material. “This extraordinary growth of China’s aluminum capacity has been the overriding theme of the last 20 years,” he added, saying it has determined the political, trading and pricing landscape in the aluminum industry. “What would you say if I told you everything was about to change,” Home asked attendees, adding that he believed the “Chinese aluminum juggernaut was about to run out of road.” He said this is in part because the Chinese government has capped national aluminum production capacity at 45 million metric tons per year and has deemed 3 million metric tons of capacity “illegal” and inoperable because it was built without authorization from the Chinese government. “We are starting to see Chinese production hit that local de facto ceiling,” Home said. In the past, Home said he would have expected that capacity ceiling to be raised. “Not this time around,” he said, citing President Xi Jinping’s commitment to reach carbon neutrality by 2060. Home described this as an “existential threat” to many Chinese smelters, which use coal to power their furnaces. Home added that some smelters have transferred plants to the hydro-rich Yunnan province, though he said the country’s green power capacity is limited. “The evidence of this new tension is there in China’s trade,” Home said. “The world’s biggest producer seems to be short of metal,” he said, citing China’s imports of primary aluminum and aluminum alloy. Home said the country has imported 1.3 million metric tons of primary aluminum and 1.1 million metric tons of aluminum alloy since January 2020 through March of this year. “This changes the entire landscape, I would suggest, of the global aluminum market.” Asian locations account for 90 percent of London Metal Exchange (LME) registered on-warrant stocks, 86 percent of LME “shadow” off-warrant stocks and 22 percent of CME stocks, Home said. “This is bad news for buyers everywhere else,” he added, citing rising global aluminum premiums and shipping disruptions that are making other importing countries more vulnerable. Wilk said U.S. aluminum demand increased from 2009 through 2020, having peaked at 28.1 billion pounds in 2018. While aluminum demand likely contracted to 24.5 billion pounds in 2020 from 27.6 billion pounds in 2019, it was still 30 percent higher than it was in 2009. She pointed to a number of market trends that have benefited aluminum, including shifting consumer preferences for beverage cans that saw can sheet shipments increase 3.3 percent in 2020; the move toward electric vehicles and increased fuel economy that will intensify light-weighting demands in the transportation sector; renewed attention to the electrical grid that could lead to significant investments; and opportunities in renewables in the area of transmission as well as products, such as solar panel frames. Wilk said the U.S., which relies heavily on secondary aluminum production rather than primary production, has the opportunity to produce more aluminum but doing so will rely on the collection of scrap and recycling. Home added that the aluminum market has been carrying historically high stocks for some time, which offers some cushion. However, if we are going to see a sustained increase in demand as predicted , then the market has a considerable long-term supply challenge to overcome. He said it was hard to see how recycling more alone can close the gap. “The world is going to need more primary aluminum capacity,” Home said. “I’m not sure we can rely on the assumption that China will build it." Wilk said the industry will have to recycle a great deal more and produce more primary aluminum. “I hope the U.S. can contribute in both areas.” The city of Canton, Massachusetts, has announced it will continue using Republic Services of Phoenix for its waste management. The $2.08 million contract was approved last week and takes effect July 1, says Financial Director William R. Scollins. “They have been a great representative among the townspeople,” Scollins says. “These services are personal, and Republic had gotten positive feedback from our residents.” The contract is for three years and is covered through the city’s general fund. At the end of the three years, the city can renew the contract or can seek other providers. Republic also provided the town with containers, and at the end of the contract, the town will own them, Scollins says. “If we went with a different provider, we wouldn’t have fully owned those containers, and that played a role in our selection of Republic,” he adds. Republic Services will oversee the waste management services for the town’s 23,629 residents, and collection will be done daily. This includes collecting and disposing of trash from residents, residential curbside recycling, Canton Park trash collection, roll-off containers for the Pine Street recycling facility, town e-scrap and recycling of televisions and computers. Collection routes will remain the same, and service will not be interrupted. Dan Higgins, the municipal services manager for Republic, says the company is pleased to retain the town of Canton’s business, the Canton Citizen reports. The main change in the contract is that Republic will transfer recyclables to a material recovery facility (MRF) operated by Waste Management (WM) of Houston. WM will oversee the processing of recyclables. Scollins says the cost of WM’s recycling services are based on tonnage, ranging between $100,000 to $200,000 annually. “The rate varies because Waste Management goes through each ton to see what is recyclable and what isn’t,” Scollins says. “Depending on what is in the ton, if it's contaminated or not, the price could rise.” Officials are planning to educate residents on what they can and can’t recycle to make sure costs are low for the city. Republic Services will work with the town’s Sustainability Committee, made up volunteers from the community, to reduce the volume of trash by educating residents on materials reuse. Educational materials include pamphlets and flyers. “We want to focus on encouraging diligent recycling,” Scollins says. “Our Sustainability Committee is active in citizen education and boosting recycling efforts. Republic Services assisting us will be a big help.” The town contract with Republic is almost $1.9 million more than its previous contract, which was $1.9 million. Scollins says the increase is because prevailing wages have increased, which means the city has to pay more for the hauling of recyclables. Scollins says that the town and Republic Services have been working together for longer than six years. “The town has been very satisfied with Republic,” Scollins says. “They’ve been very accommodating despite additional costs they’ve incurred because of market changes. They’ve been a good business partner to the town.”   International Paper (IP), Memphis, Tennessee, says demand for corrugated and containerboard has been strong this year in its first-quarter earnings report April 29. “International Paper delivered solid earnings and strong cash generation in the first quarter,” says Mark Sutton, chairman and CEO at International Paper. “Operationally, we performed well to mitigate the significant impact of the winter storm and support strong customer demand in our packaging business. Looking ahead, we see momentum continuing to build in our three businesses. We expect continued strong demand for corrugated packaging and absorbent pulp, and we’re seeing a much better supply/demand backdrop for printing papers, all of which contributes to a more favorable outlook in 2021.” According to IP’s first-quarter earnings report, the company achieved earnings of $349 million, about 88 cents per diluted share, compared with earnings of $153 million, or 39 cents per diluted share, in the fourth quarter of 2020 and compared with a loss of $141 million in the first quarter of 2020. The company says first-quarter 2020 net earnings included an after-tax charge of $337 million, or 85 cents per diluted share, for the impairment of net assets and write-off of foreign currency translation adjustment following the announcement of the sale of IP’s Brazil Packaging business. IP reports that adjusted operating earnings were $299 million, or 76 cents per diluted share, compared with $296 million, 57 cents per diluted share, in the first quarter of 2020. First-quarter 2021 adjusted operating earnings include a pretax earnings impact of an $80 million loss related to winter storms that affected locations in the South. According to the company’s earnings call, input costs for the first quarter of the year were “unfavorable” in part because of the winter storm that affected much of the southern U.S. in February and overall higher costs of recovered fiber. The company said it expects recovered fiber costs to remain high in the second quarter as well. "We expect continued strong demand for corrugated packaging and absorbent pulp, and we’re seeing a much better supply/demand backdrop for printing papers, all of which contributes to a more favorable outlook in 2021.” -- Mark Sutton, chairman and CEO, International Paper In Q1 2021, IP says it monetized about $400 million of investment in Graphic Packaging to bring its ownership to 7.4 percent. Packaging and Papers segments In IP’s Industrial Packaging segment, operating profits in Q1 2021 were at $447 million compared with $431 million in Q4 2020. In North America, earnings were solid as higher sales prices for boxes and export containerboard were offset by a $75 million loss from the winter storm that affected many states in the South in February. According to the company’s first-quarter earnings call April 29, IP lost 145,000 tons of containerboard production because of the storm in February. The company reported that 30 plants in the southern U.S. were affected by winter storms, affecting box shipments in the quarter. Within the Industrial Packaging segment, IP says planned maintenance outages also were higher in Q1 2021. In Europe, IP says earnings in this segment improved, reflecting seasonally higher volumes in Morocco and lower operating costs, partially offset by lower average sales margins driven by higher containerboard costs. IP reports that its Printing Papers segment achieved operating profits of $80 million in the first quarter of 2021 and in the fourth quarter of 2020. In North America, IP says earnings were lower, driven by higher input costs for wood and energy and higher planned maintenance outage expenses partially offset by lower economic downtime costs. In Brazil, IP says earnings improved as seasonally lower sales volumes and higher input costs were offset by higher average sales prices, lower operating costs and favorable foreign currency impacts mostly offset by lower average sales prices, an unfavorable geographic mix and higher input costs. “We see momentum building,” Sutton said during the earnings call. “We see strong demand for corrugated packaging and containerboard in North America and Europe.”

Brilex Industries Acquisitions

1 Acquisition

Brilex Industries acquired 1 company. Their latest acquisition was U.S. Shredder on October 09, 2018.

Date

Investment Stage

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Total Funding

Note

Sources

10/9/2018

$99M

Acquired

1

Date

10/9/2018

Investment Stage

Companies

Valuation

$99M

Total Funding

Note

Acquired

Sources

1

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