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About BlueScope Steel

BlueScope Steel is a supplier of steel products and solutions focused on building and construction markets.

BlueScope Steel Headquarter Location

Melbourne, Victoria,

Australia

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Latest BlueScope Steel News

3B Automated Recycling invests for improved C&D processing

Sep 23, 2021

3B Automated Recycling invests for improved C&D processing 3B Automated Recycling utilizes a Komptech Terminator pre-shredder to help meet a growing C&D processing demand in Austin, Texas. Since the adoption of a construction and demolition (C&D) recycling ordinance in 2016, contractors in Austin, Texas, have been faced with a growing need for C&D recycling infrastructure within the city. 3B Automated Recycling , an extension of Austin-based construction roll-off and recycling company  Recon Services Inc. , has been working to fill that gap through the development of a state-of-the-art automated recycling center. “We started [3B Recycling] to divert waste from the landfill, since we don’t own a landfill,” says Walter Biel, owner of both 3B Recycling and Recon Services. “So, it was a great opportunity for us to set up a recycling facility for the material that our hauling company hauled, and also meet the new city ordinance that’s in place here in Austin.” Under the ordinance, contractors on projects where building permits are issued for more than 5,000 square feet of new, added or remodeled floor area are required to divert at least half of the construction project debris from landfill. An alternative requirement is that builders dispose of no more than 2.5 pounds of material per square foot of floor area in the landfill. Given the influx of C&D debris needing to be recycled by contractors across the city, Biel says 3B Recycling needed an advanced system to handle a growing volume of material. The facility has gone through several design phases, according to Biel, with the most recent expansion including the addition of artificial intelligence and robotic sorting systems to sort materials with “safety, speed and quality.” INSIDE THE SYSTEM 3B Recycling’s current facility consists of various pieces of equipment and design elements to create high-quality end products to be sold into the marketplace. The recycling line first starts with a  Builtrite  Model 2300-SE electric material handler equipped with an orange peel grapple that is used to begin placing material into the sorting system. This material is then fed into a  Komptech  Terminator pre-shredder to be sized. Featuring robust teeth on the shredding drum and an opposing counter comb, Komptech says the Terminator can be used on applications from course pre-crushing to defined shredding. “The Terminator is important for us because we want to size all the material that comes into our line,” says Biel. “We size our material to 36-inch-minus, so everything that comes up [the line] is very consistent. It’s a great size for everybody to put their hands on—it’s not too big, it’s not too little—and it’s the perfect size for our system.” Biel adds that having the material properly sized at the front end of the system is a key aspect to maintaining productivity on the line. “By having everything consistently sized, you don’t have a sheet of … plywood coming down the line that is so big that you can’t put your hands on it. It just allows us to be very efficient in what we’re doing,” he says. “When we first started looking into purchasing a shredder, we looked at other facilities overseas in Europe that have Komptech equipment. We saw it operate and it was very efficient in those facilities, and we’re very happy with it on our line.” After making its way through the pre-shredder, material is then placed on a two-dimensional (2D) picking line. This process helps sort flat cardboard, paper and plastic materials, an extra step that the company says will ensure a higher percentage of recycling per load. Once the 2D materials have been sorted out, material heads to a Komptech Ballistor ballistic separator. At this point in the recycling process, the Ballistor will separate out usable fractions from waste and potential recyclables. By combining ballistic separation with screening, Biel says the Ballistor, in just one pass, will separate the material stream based on three different categories: two- and three-dimensional, rolling-cubic-rigid/flat-soft-narrow, and by particle size. Next, the waste steam will pass through a high-powered electromagnet placed above the conveyor belt to remove all ferrous materials from the line. Following this, the stream is further separated through a  Sparta Manufacturing  Finger Screen. According to 3B Recycling, this unit promotes better separation of waste by spreading the material, thus resulting in a steady flow to the sorters on the main line and increasing the probability that the smallest particles will find their way through the fingers. Lastly, a Sparta Z-Pan Feeder is used to ensure a steady flow of C&D material to the robotic separation 3D pick line. Here, the automated sorting process will sort multiple fractions and large objects with one robot, which reduces the need for manual sorting. CERTIFIED SERVICE With a processing capacity of 913 tons per day, Biel says the 3B Recycling facility is currently running roughly 40 to 50 tons per hour. Given the system’s throughput and high purity rate of materials it extracts from the waste stream, 3B Recycling recycles approximately 81 percent of the C&D materials it receives. These achievements have earned 3B Recycling the honor of being the only  Recycling Certification Institute- (RCI) -certified C&D recycler in the state of Texas. “It was a very detailed qualification [process]. So, it’s not just a matter of whether you recycle, it’s more [about being able to show] you run a top-notch company,” Biel says, “The qualifications for certification were that we had to be a real recycler, that we could validate where our material went to, that we could validate that we had insurance for our employees, etc. I mean, they looked at our whole company.” According to Biel, 3B Recycling sells most of its materials to several companies throughout the state for use in their operations. “We sell our [recycled C&D materials] to different places,” says Biel. “All the metal that we pull out goes to a metal broker, the cardboard we pull out goes to a cardboard company, our concrete goes to our crushing operation, and the wood we have goes to a company and they use it as alternative fuel to make cement,” says Biel. Innovation in C&D recycling is nothing new to Biel. In 2018, the  Construction and Demolition Recycling Association (CDRA)  recognized his company as its Recycler of the Year, in part, for its innovation in being the first C&D recycler in the Western Hemisphere to incorporate robots in its operations. For a company used to pushing the boundaries, perhaps it should come as no surprise that Biel says he is looking towards the future in regard to new developments and growth. “We look at all opportunities that come in front of us for expansions, whether it be in Texas or in a different marketplace,” he says. “So, we are always looking at different opportunities.” This article originally appeared in the Sept./Oct. issue of Construction & Demolition Recycling magazine. The author is the assistant editor of Construction & Demolition Recycling magazine and can be reached at  hrischar@gie.net . To combat the hazards associated with extreme heat exposure—both indoors and out—the White House announced Sept. 20 enhanced and expanded efforts the U.S. Department of Labor is taking to address heat-related illnesses in America’s workforce. As part of the  Biden-Harris administration's interagency effort  and commitment to workplace safety, climate resilience and environmental justice, the department's  Occupational Safety and Health Administration  is initiating enhanced measures to protect workers better in hot environments and reduce the dangers of exposure to ambient heat. While heat illness is largely preventable, and commonly under-reported, thousands of workers are sickened each year by workplace heat exposure. Despite widespread under-reporting, 43  workers died  from heat illness in 2019, and at least 2,410 others suffered serious injuries and illnesses. Increasing heat precipitated by climate change can cause lost productivity and work hours resulting in significant wage losses for workers. The Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center  estimates  the economic loss from heat to be at least $100 billion annually—a number that could double by 2030 and quintuple by 2050 under a higher emissions scenario. To emphasize its concern and take necessary action, OSHA is implementing  an enforcement initiative  on heat-related hazards, developing a  National Emphasis Program  on heat inspections, and launching a rulemaking process to develop a workplace heat standard. In addition, the agency is forming a  National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health  Heat Injury and Illness Prevention Work Group to provide better understanding of challenges and to identify and share best practices to protect workers. “Throughout the nation, millions of workers face serious hazards from high temperatures both outdoors and indoors. Amid changing climate, the growing frequency and intensity of extreme heat events is increasing the dangers workers face, especially for workers of color who disproportionately work in essential jobs in tough conditions,” U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Marty Walsh says. “As secretary of labor, my priority is to make sure we are taking appropriate action to keep workers healthy and safe on the job.” OSHA implemented an intervention and enforcement initiative recently to prevent and protect workers from heat-related illnesses and deaths while they are working in hazardous hot environments. The newly established initiative prioritizes heat-related interventions and inspections of work activities on days when the heat index exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit. “While agricultural and construction workers often come to mind first when thinking about workers most exposed to heat hazards, without proper safety actions, sun protection and climate control, intense heat can be harmful to a wide variety of workers indoors or outdoors and during any season,” Acting Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health Jim Frederick says. The OSHA initiative applies to indoor and outdoor work sites in general industry, construction, agriculture and maritime where potential heat-related hazards exist. On days when a recognized heat temperature can result in increased risks of  heat-related illnesses , OSHA will increase enforcement efforts. Employers are encouraged to proactively implement intervention methods on heat priority days, including regularly taking breaks for water, rest, shade; training workers on how to identify common symptoms and what to do when a worker suspects a heat-related illness is occurring; and taking periodic measurements to determine workers' heat exposure. OSHA area directors across the nation will institute the following: Prioritize inspections of heat-related complaints, referrals and employer-reported illnesses and initiate an on-site investigation where possible. Instruct compliance safety and health officers during their travels to job sites to conduct an intervention (providing the agency's heat poster/wallet card, discuss the importance of easy access to cool water, cooling areas and acclimatization) or opening an inspection when they observe employees performing strenuous work in hot conditions. Expand the scope of other inspections to address heat-related hazards where work site conditions or other evidence indicates these hazards may be present. In October, OSHA will take a significant step toward a federal heat standard to ensure protections in workplaces across the country exist by issuing an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on heat injury and illness prevention in outdoor and indoor work settings. The advance notice will initiate a comment period allowing OSHA to gather diverse perspectives and technical expertise on topics including heat stress thresholds, heat acclimatization planning, exposure monitoring, and strategies to protect workers. The agency is also working to establish a National Emphasis Program on heat hazard cases, which will target high-risk industries and focus agency resources and staff time on heat inspections. The 2022 National Emphasis Program will build on the existing Regional Emphasis Program for Heat Illnesses in OSHA's Region VI, which covers Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. For  OC Waste & Recycling (OCWR) —which oversees the solid waste disposal needs of 34 cities and 16 unincorporated areas throughout Orange County, California—ensuring the safety and health of the community, as well as the agency’s employees, is a top priority. Over the last few years, the county has put an emphasis on utilizing modern management techniques to better regulate the county’s three active landfills: the Olinda Alpha Landfill near Brea, the Frank R. Bowerman Landfill near Irvine and the Prima Deshecha Landfill next to San Juan Capistrano. These efforts have translated into the creation of an online safety management system, known as OC Safety, to document and track details related to safety, including audits, training, inspections, near misses, and the reporting of incidents and injuries. “[OC Safety] was developed in partnership between the OC Waste & Recycling agency and the county’s IT department,” says Jordan Young, safety culture manager for OCWR. “What it does is it allows us to easily and efficiently track all the details that we need to with regard to these inspections, audits and incidents, and do it in a consistent way that provides transparency and accountability.” The first prototype of OC Safety was originally developed internally by landfill staff with prior safety and technical knowledge, says Young. Once the agency caught wind of the rudimentary program and recognized the value of having a digital safety management system, it soon began to invest in the development of a more formal program. “We started developing [the program] back in 2016,” says Tom Koutroulis, director for OCWR. “As it was being developed, we wanted to incorporate a lot of the safety-related information to provide analysis as to how we are managing operations for not only our employees, but also as it related to the public and contractors that were coming in. “OC Safety is really a tool for our employees to take advantage of [to improve] safety at the sites. Our industry is ranked one of the sixth [most dangerous] industries, so, knowing that … we see this as a step in the right direction for us to provide a safer working environment for our employees and those that frequent the landfill.” SIMPLIFYING OPERATIONS   With the responsibility of managing more than 4 million tons of solid waste from over 3 million residents and businesses across the county, OCWR’s three landfills are among the largest in the state. Given the scale of the county’s operations, Young says keeping track of records and documentation prior to the development of OC Safety was a challenge. “Anyone from the waste industry can understand that when you have more than one landfill or more than one facility, you have various employees working in different locations,” he says. “Before we had the web-based system, we were looking at paper documents and had to make sure those were getting reviewed and that we kept a good record of them. “OC Safety took us from the days of papers and snail mail and days and days between submitting a form and having that recorded or verified to all those things happening instantly.” Now, landfill supervisors can file inspection reports via phone or tablet application. Within the system, Young says users can document the location, report any findings and include a picture. These details are then uploaded directly to the electronic system, which can be routed to other required reviewers to incorporate feedback or edits. Depending on what type of incident report or form is created, the system will notify the correct personnel through a series of distribution lists. “The system will automatically notify the people who need to be notified, whether it be a landfill superintendent, a landfill manager or the safety manager,” says Young. “That’s a big benefit for the agency when it comes to completing inspections. As soon as the tablet hits connectivity or is plugged back in at the office, the results of the inspection are distributed to the person who is responsible for following up on any issues.” “OC Safety took us from the days of papers and snail mail and days and days between submitting a form and having that recorded or verified to all those things happening instantly.” – Jordan Young, safety culture manager, OCWR Supervisors can also run reports and trend analysis rather than having to manually enter data into spreadsheets, which has simplified the process of identifying areas for improvement. “When we look at the incidents and accidents that are happening on an individual case by case basis, we always identify the root cause in order to implement effective corrective actions,” says Young. “But when you take a step back and you look at the data or trend analysis, you can learn more about what’s happening in the organization and which areas of our safety program need more focus.” This practice has been particularly effective in the event of near misses, where trend analysis gives supervisors the opportunity to identify hazards and find solutions. “OC Safety gives us a tool to identify issues and track who did the investigation, what solutions were identified and the status on the implementation of those solutions,” says Young. “And before anything can be closed out, it has to be field verified. So, whether it’s the safety representative or a supervisor, someone goes out to the field and documents that is has been effectively implemented.” GETTING FAMILIAR Since its launch in 2020, OC Safety has been adopted by half of the county’s agencies and is projected to be running in all 22 of them later this year. To facilitate the widespread rollout, OCWR developed a class for supervisors to help transition them from paper reporting to utilizing the web platform. “Each field supervisor goes through a class called Supervisor Safety Training. So, essentially whenever someone is promoted to a new supervisory position, we walk them through traditional safety training to help them understand and become familiar with their new roles and responsibilities with regards to safety,” says Young. “We also cover documentation and record-keeping practices, and that’s where we give them an introduction into the system, how it works and how to utilize that.” In addition, the agency uses a process where they will partner a newer employee with a more experienced employee to practice performing facility safety inspections. By automating the documentation of OCWR’s safety-related inspections, Koutroulis says the agency has seen a decrease in incidents. However, he notes the most important area of improvement has been in overall safety culture. “Our industry is driven by its people,” he says. “You can have the best piece of equipment; you can have a state-of-the-art facility, but if you don’t have the right mindset and the right people in place, you’re going to be faced with these challenges. So, what we’ve tried to do is identify our opportunities with our team so they can use these tools to further improve upon our safety culture and demonstrate that we care enough to invest in this. “Their use and efforts of following the process and implementing the near-miss program demonstrates their level of care and engagement. For us, it’s sort of a way of identifying the benefit of having that level of engagement and empowering your employees to take control and ownership of their own safety.” This article originally appeared in the Sept. issue of Waste Today. The author is the assistant editor of Waste Today and can be reached at  hrischar@gie.net . Australia-based steelmaker BlueScope Steel Ltd. is reportedly considering building a new electric arc furnace (EAF) mill on the East Coast of the United States, in part because of an optimistic outlook for the U.S. construction sector. Citing a BlueScope investors’ webcast, the Australian Financial Review (AFR) says the planned mill’s output would support BlueScope painted and coated steel products that are part of its Buildings North America  business unit. AFR says BlueScope Chief Executive Mark Vassella indicated any new EAF investment was likely to be in the form of a greenfield location, since current mill operators are seeking high bids to sell any existing assets. An investor briefing pack prepared by BlueScope and available on its website indicates its Buildings North America operation serves a customer base of more than 2,000 builders who use BlueScope products and “proprietary design software in the construction segment to win work and add value in the construction process.” “What gives us confidence to investigate [a new mill] is it’s a very large market,” AFR quotes Vassella as saying about the end market for steel produced at an East Coast EAF plant. On the melt shop raw materials side, the BlueScope briefing pack refers to a “strong existing supply base in North Star’s region [for] both prime and obsolete scrap.” BlueScope seemingly has committed to remaining part of the U.S. mill sector with a $1 billion expansion underway at its BlueScope North Star EAF mill in Delta, Ohio. That expansion is slated for completion  next year. Charlotte, North Carolina-based Nucor Corp. says it will build a 3 million-ton-pear-year electric arc furnace (EAF) steel mill in one of three states: Ohio, Pennsylvania or West Virginia. The announcement comes just three days after Pittsburgh-based United States Steel Corp. announced its intention to install EAF capacity  on a similar scale in the Southeast. Nucor says its board of directors has approved the construction of what it calls a state-of-the-art sheet mill with 3 million tons per year of capacity. “Nucor is evaluating locations in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia,” states the EAF steelmaker. “The new mill will be geographically situated to serve customers in the Midwest and Northeast markets and will have a significantly lower carbon footprint than nearby competitors,” adds Nucor. “This greenfield sheet mill complements Nucor’s existing operations, allowing us to more effectively service customers in the region and grow our core business while creating substantial value for our shareholders,” says Leon Topalian, Nucor president and CEO. “This mill will allow us to competitively meet the growing need that many of our customers, particularly in the automotive market, have for high-quality steel with a lower carbon footprint,” he adds. The new sheet mill is expected to cost approximately $2.7 billion and will be able to produce hot-rolled sheet products with downstream processing including a tandem cold mill, annealing capabilities and two galvanizing lines. Nucor predominantly uses scrap metal to feed its furnaces, though the firm also produces direct reduced iron (DRI) at a plant in Louisiana. Once a site is selected and after permitting and other regulatory approvals are received, construction is expected to take two years, Nucor says. “The green and digital economy is being built with steel, and Nucor, as one of the cleanest steelmakers in the world, is poised to be able to meet these unique opportunities,” Topalian says.

BlueScope Steel Investments

1 Investments

BlueScope Steel has made 1 investments. Their latest investment was in Steel & Tube Holdings as part of their Corporate Minority - P2P on October 10, 2018.

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BlueScope Steel Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

10/19/2018

Corporate Minority - P2P

Steel & Tube Holdings

Yes

1

Date

10/19/2018

Round

Corporate Minority - P2P

Company

Steel & Tube Holdings

Amount

New?

Yes

Co-Investors

Sources

1

BlueScope Steel Partners & Customers

1 Partners and customers

BlueScope Steel has 1 strategic partners and customers. BlueScope Steel recently partnered with Tata Steel on November 11, 2005.

Date

Type

Business Partner

Country

News Snippet

Sources

11/10/2005

Partner

Tata Steel

India

Tata Steel and BlueScope Steel Announce Joint Venture and Construction of New Metallic and Painting.

Tata Steel and BlueScope Steel Limited have agreed to enter into a partnership and form a new joint venture company in India .

1

Date

11/10/2005

Type

Partner

Business Partner

Tata Steel

Country

India

News Snippet

Tata Steel and BlueScope Steel Announce Joint Venture and Construction of New Metallic and Painting.

Tata Steel and BlueScope Steel Limited have agreed to enter into a partnership and form a new joint venture company in India .

Sources

1

BlueScope Steel Team

7 Team Members

BlueScope Steel has 7 team members, including former Chief Executive Officer, George Glover.

Name

Work History

Title

Status

George Glover

Chief Executive Officer

Former

Mike Courtnall

President

Former

Bill Jacob

Commercial Metals Company, and Harsco

President

Former

Michael Parker

President

Former

Paul Zuckerman

PPG Industries, Fletcher Building, and Bradken

President

Former

Name

George Glover

Mike Courtnall

Bill Jacob

Michael Parker

Paul Zuckerman

Work History

Commercial Metals Company, and Harsco

PPG Industries, Fletcher Building, and Bradken

Title

Chief Executive Officer

President

President

President

President

Status

Former

Former

Former

Former

Former

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