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Angel Investor (Individual)

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Investments

12

Portfolio Exits

2

About Alexander Lloyd

Alexander Lloyd is a San Francisco-based angel investor who typically invests upto $150K in young companies. Lloyd prefers to invest in early-stage companies in the first round. Geographically, he prefers companies in Silicon Valley, New York,and Seattle focused in the IT and internet sectors. His areas of expertise and where he aims to help portfolio companies include VC fund-raising, social gaming, and marketing automation. <br />Alexander Lloyd is the founder and managing partner of Accelerator Ventures, a venture fund focused on seed-stage investments. Prior to founding Accelerator Ventures, Alexander was a venture partner at Rustic Canyon Partners, where he oversaw the development of their seed-stage investment strategy. Before working in Venture Capital, Alexander was the Business Development Manager in Microsoft's Silicon Valley office responsible for Microsoft's relationships with the West Coast venture capital and startup community. Alexander has also worked as a Product Manager in SGI�s workstation division and has held marketing positions at Activision and Apple Computer. Alexander began his career at Goldman Sachs, where he spent three years as a financial analyst. <br />Born in New York City, Alexander was raised in Paris, France, and is fluent in French. Alexander earned a BA in International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania and an MBA in Entrepreneurial Management from The Wharton School. He sits on the boards of SF Camerawork and Junior Achievement of San Francisco and was recently re-appointed to the San Francisco Art Commission by Mayor Gavin Newsom.

Alexander Lloyd Headquarters Location

San Francisco, California,

United States

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Latest Alexander Lloyd News

A Troubled Childhood Can Cause Imbalances In How The Brain Processes Risks And Rewards

Apr 17, 2022

I write about the world of psychology. Apr 17, 2022, getty A new study published in the journal of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences explores the impact of adverse childhood experiences, i.e., extreme stressors that occur between the age of 0-18, on the development of the brain. According to the study, people who have had negative childhood experiences are more likely to show certain cognitive deficits as adults, particularly in the area of decision making. Alexander Lloyd, a researcher at the University of London in England, splits adverse childhood experiences into three main categories: Threatening events, which includes physical abuse, emotional abuse, and sexual abuse Neglect, including physical and emotional neglect Family adversity, which includes parental divorce, parental substance abuse, mental illness within the household, and/or having an incarcerated relative “There has been a large body of research on the links between adverse childhood experiences and the development of the brain,” says Lloyd. “However, less research has examined the impact of these experiences on how we make decisions and process rewards.” To study this relationship, Lloyd and team used a experimental task called ‘patch foraging,’ wherein a person plays a farming video game of sorts in which they must choose between sticking with a known patch with known rewards that diminish over time or exploring a new patch with unknown rewards. “In our task, individuals had to collect apples from trees,” explains Lloyd. “The longer they stayed with their current tree, the fewer apples would be available to collect. Alternatively, they could leave to travel to a new tree which had a fresh bunch of apples. Using this task, we were able to calculate how much weight individuals place on recent reward feedback versus more historic feedback.” MORE FOR YOU The findings demonstrated two key things: Adverse childhood experiences were linked to less task exploration, implying that people who had negative childhood experiences were less likely to take advantage of the full range of rewards available in their environment Individuals who had been exposed to adverse childhood experiences showed less exploration overall, a sign that they were under-valuing the reward feedback they were receiving in the game “We think that our findings may be linked to the development of regions of the brain that are responsible for processing rewards, as previous research has found that individuals who have experienced adverse childhood experiences have less neural activation in response to rewards compared to individuals without these experiences,” says Lloyd. For clinicians and individuals helping people who have experienced adverse childhood experiences, Lloyd has the following advice: Since individuals who have experienced adverse childhood experiences are less likely to explore new opportunities, it could be helpful for professionals working with people with adverse childhood experiences to understand that experiences of adversity can be associated with a reluctance to try new things, which may make certain interventions more difficult for people with these experiences Individuals with adverse childhood experiences also tend to under-value reward feedback. So, encouraging individuals with adverse childhood experiences to recognize positive reward feedback may also be helpful when supporting somebody with experiences of adversity. The authors hope that their findings will contribute to a better understanding of the negative impacts associated with adverse childhood experiences and may inform future studies that aim to support those who have experienced adversity. “Ultimately, I would like to see future research develop interventions to reduce the mental health impacts of adversity by identifying specific features of cognition that are impacted by these experiences,” concludes Lloyd.

Alexander Lloyd Investments

12 Investments

Alexander Lloyd has made 12 investments. Their latest investment was in Lemnos as part of their Seed on November 11, 2012.

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Alexander Lloyd Investments Activity

investments chart

Date

Round

Company

Amount

New?

Co-Investors

Sources

11/18/2012

Seed

Lemnos

$1.85M

Yes

2

1/28/2012

Seed VC

Talkable

$1.2M

Yes

3/1/2011

Series A - II

Playnomics

$1.38M

No

1

12/17/2009

Series A

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$99M

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10

7/11/2008

Seed VC

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$99M

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0

Date

11/18/2012

1/28/2012

3/1/2011

12/17/2009

7/11/2008

Round

Seed

Seed VC

Series A - II

Series A

Seed VC

Company

Lemnos

Talkable

Playnomics

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Amount

$1.85M

$1.2M

$1.38M

$99M

$99M

New?

Yes

Yes

No

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Co-Investors

Sources

2

1

10

0

Alexander Lloyd Portfolio Exits

2 Portfolio Exits

Alexander Lloyd has 2 portfolio exits. Their latest portfolio exit was Playnomics on April 16, 2014.

Date

Exit

Companies

Valuation
Valuations are submitted by companies, mined from state filings or news, provided by VentureSource, or based on a comparables valuation model.

Acquirer

Sources

4/16/2014

Acquired

$99M

1

7/1/2010

Acquired

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$99M

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0

Date

4/16/2014

7/1/2010

Exit

Acquired

Acquired

Companies

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Valuation

$99M

$99M

Acquirer

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Sources

1

0

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