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venda.com

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Founded Year

2001

Stage

Acquired | Acquired

Total Raised

$30M

Valuation

$0000 

About Venda

Venda is a provider of digital commerce solutions, leveraged by manufacturers and retailers to deliver a consistent brand experience across online, mobile and in-store channels. Since 2001, Venda has helped its clients navigate the fast-evolving digital commerce landscape, providing design, build, operational and support services; maximising ROI through expanded revenues and contained costs. Venda's cloud-based Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) platform processes millions of transitions every month, for clients with online revenues ranging from £15m to over £150m.

Venda Headquarter Location

1500 Broadway

New York, New York, 10036,

United States

212-808-4004

Latest Venda News

The 33 Essential Restaurants in Providence

Nov 11, 2021

Rhode Islanders love bragging about the state’s great food scene, which punches well above its weight for the smallest state in the union. The “official state appetizer,” Rhode Island-style calamari, even stole the show during the virtual roll call at the 2020 Democratic National Convention . The state’s capital city has a lot going for it culinarily: easy access to top-quality produce and seafood from nearby farms and waterways; a world-class culinary school in Johnson & Wales; and tons of quirky regional specialties like coffee milk, stuffies (stuffed clams), clam cakes, and Del’s Lemonade. Plus, rents on restaurant spaces tend to be cheaper than in nearby Boston, drawing talented chefs who want to venture into first-time ownership. Home to the Rhode Island School of Design and many working artists, Providence also has an indie, artsy feel to it, which has trickled into the ethos of many of its restaurants. Update November, 2021: Providence’s food scene was thriving before the pandemic wreaked havoc on restaurants, shutting down many kitchens for months in 2020 and others for good. In recent months, restaurateurs have had to deal with inflated prices for ingredients, staffing shortages, and supply chain disruptions. Despite the challenges, many owners have found ways to make it work by offering takeout (some for the first time) or setting up year-round outdoor tables on streets, sidewalks, and patios. Some businesses also now require a negative PCR test or proof of vaccination for indoor dining, so come prepared to dine. Still, even a pandemic can’t suppress the city’s bubbling culinary energy and hometown pride, evident in every bite at Providence’s 33 best restaurants. Note: The inclusion of restaurants offering dine-in service should not be taken as an endorsement for dining inside. Studies indicate a lower exposure risk to COVID-19 outdoors, but the level of risk is contingent on social distancing and other safety guidelines. Check with each restaurant for up-to-date information on dining offerings. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the Rhode Island Department of Health . This spot serves the quintessential Rhode Island treat known as the hot wiener (also known as a “New York system” for its Coney Island origins). Order one “all the way” and you’ll get a pork and veal hot dog enveloped in a steamed bun and slathered with meat sauce, mustard, and onions, plus a sprinkle of celery salt. Pair your wieners with a coffee milk for the ultimate savory-sweet combo. Operated by the Stevens family for 75 years, Olneyville New York System has received a James Beard America’s Classics Award and many local accolades. Often busy after the bars close, the restaurant is open until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 a.m. every other day of the week. Hot wieners If you could turn a block party into a restaurant, you’d end up with Troop. Inspired by hip-hop culture, skateboarding, and street food from around the world, this colorful, graffitied restaurant is run by a group of partners, including chef Jason Timothy and Revival Brewing owner Sean Larkin (whose beers are on tap). The food menu features several vegan options, such as spicy-sweet wok-charred cauliflower and a fried tofu banh mi. For carnivores, there’s an oversized cheeseburger and fall-off-the-bone jerk chicken. Drinks include the tequila-based BLM Cocktail, with $4 from each sale benefiting a local nonprofit dedicated to diversity and inclusion. Inside Troop Don’t let the name Nick confuse you; chef-owner Derek Wagner is at the helm here. Almost 20 years ago, fresh out of Johnson & Wales culinary school, then 24-year-old Wagner bought the diner from its longtime owner. He kept the name but freshened up the kitchen with a modern menu and local sourcing. It’s been one of the busiest restaurants in the city ever since, so expect to wait for a table or make a reservation, especially for weekend brunch. Nab a counter seat to get a front-row view into the open kitchen where you can watch Wagner and his crew crank out everything from eggs Benedict to house-made chicken pate to cornmeal-fried Rhode Island scup. Pair your order with a side of crazy-good grilled bread. Chocolate babka for brunch Run by Alan Costantino since the 1970s, this Italian food emporium is an ideal place to kick off a jaunt through famed Federal Hill, Providence’s historically Italian enclave. Like a smaller, mom-and-pop version of Eataly, Venda is filled to the brim with gastronomic delights, including hunks of Parmigiano-Reggiano and aged Asiago, fresh and frozen pasta (try the popular lobster ravioli), and pantry staples. If the weather’s nice, order an Aperol spritz and margherita pizza from the restaurant arm of the business, Costantino’s, to enjoy by the fountain on Venda’s outdoor patio in DePasquale Square. Margherita pizza at Costantino’s Costantino’s Fried dough is at its finest at Knead Doughnuts, where bakers transform butter, sugar, and flour into glorious old-fashioned, brioche-style, and cake doughnuts. Since opening in 2016, the business has been steadily growing by delivering its artisan sweets to many coffee shops around the state. Pair an airy vanilla-glazed brioche or a dense chocolate chip old-fashioned with a Bolt Coffee nitro cold brew (Bolt co-owners Todd Mackey and Brian Gibb are part-owners of Knead). While the Elmgrove Avenue outpost has a neighborhood coffee shop feel, stop by the West End’s Cromwell Street location on the weekend to get a peek at the production space. Vegan doughnuts in vanilla, piña colada, and blueberry brioch and chocolate cake Chef-owner Benjamin Sukle made a name for himself at his first restaurant, Birch, where he served thoughtful, labor-intensive, New England-by-way-of-Noma dishes. That restaurant closed during the pandemic, but the chef is still at work with Rhode Island seafood and produce at his more casual second restaurant, Oberlin. The menu centers around hand-crafted pastas and just-caught local fish, such as fluke and scup. They’re sliced raw and garnished minimally with a sprinkle of salt and a drizzle of olive oil, or served whole, grilled or roasted. Sukle’s dishes are designed for sharing, so you’ll want to round out your order with a veg (try the Tokyo turnip Caesar) and a seasonal pasta, like summertime’s lumache with sweet corn, lonza, shishitos, and mint. Topping off with some fresh cheese Oberlin Imagine a classic seafood shack by the beach, update it, and bring it to the city. That’s essentially what chefs Jason Hegedus and Nicholas Gillespie did a few years ago when they opened Dune Brothers, currently operating as a long-term pop-up out of an adorable red shack on wheels. Their takeout menu is built around traceable local seafood and includes indulgent options like buttery New England clam chowder with deep-fried clam cakes, two types of fish sandwiches, and both lobster and crab rolls. There’s outdoor seating, or you can take your briny bounty to go. Beautifully battered fried fish Perhaps no Rhode Island restaurant is as beloved as Al Forno, opened by chef Johanne Killeen and her late husband chef George Germon in 1980. From the menu to the decor, it’s a study in rustic Italian elegance. You can’t go wrong with the grilled pizza, which the couple is widely credited with inventing (it helped earn them a James Beard Award in 1993), though the bubbly baked pasta with tomato, cream, and five cheeses is also worth an order. For something sweet try the made-to-order fruit tarts. Since the pandemic, takeout and reservations for parties under six people have become available. Chef Maria Meza arrived in the U.S. in 1992 with a dream to open a restaurant. Almost 30 years later, she runs two successful eateries in Providence with her son Joaquin. While their first restaurant, El Rancho Grande, is small and casual, Dolores is like a sophisticated younger sister. Here, the Mezas cook meals inspired by Maria’s childhood in Oaxaca and Puebla: complex, long-simmered moles; hand-ground heirloom corn tortillas folded into pockets and filled with cheese to make tetelas; and an array of tamales that are also available frozen to take home. Joaquin runs the bar, which is stocked with Oaxacan mezcal and other regional spirits. Manchamanteles mole Bartender Jesse Hedberg has put together many of the state’s top-rated cocktail programs over the last decade. Naturally his latest project, the retro-styled Pizza Marvin — operated with co-owner and chef Robert Andreozzi — serves drinks that you won’t find anywhere else in town. You can enjoy his takeout-friendly bottled pizza Negroni with one of Andreozzi’s charred New Haven-inspired pizzas and sides such as a salad of coppa and cantaloupe. For a taste of true luxury, pair an order of raw littlenecks, which are abundant in local waters, with a bottle of premier cru Champagne. Pizza, drinks, and curly fries at Pizza Marvin Pizza Marvin Often seen cooking on local morning TV on The Rhode Show, chef Nick Rabar exudes so much love for Rhode Island cuisine that you’d never guess he actually grew up in New York. After spending years working in kitchens in Providence, Rabar opened his own restaurant, Avenue N, with his wife Tracy in East Providence about a decade ago. Like the original, this new Providence outpost brings fine dining flair to a generally approachable, something-for-everyone menu. Go casual with a steak and mushroom pizza or high-end with delicately fried local Walrus and Carpenter oysters dabbed with horseradish-mustard sauce. Also look for Rabar’s version of stuffies. Honey gochujang chicken wings When he first arrived in the Ocean State, chef Jake Rojas ran a highly regarded farm-to-table restaurant in Newport with his wife, Kelly Ann. More recently, the Texas native has been using his cooking skills at his always-busy taquerias. Rojas’s quick-service mix-and-match menu invites you to choose from an assortment of fillings (chipotle-braised potatoes, al pastor, carne asada, lengua), toppings, and formats (tacos, burritos, tortas, bowls). No matter what you pick, it comes out of the kitchen fast and flavorful. Pair anything with a house mezcal margarita, and in warmer months eat on the restaurant’s string light-lined outdoor patio. Coctel de camaron Youssef Akhtarini learned to bake as a teenager growing up in Aleppo, Syria. After fleeing the war-torn city and moving to Providence, Akhtarini opened Aleppo Sweets in 2019 with help from his wife, Reem. At this bakery-cafe you’ll find nearly a dozen different varieties of light and crunchy Syrian-style baklava, from a version with whole pistachios wrapped in purses of phyllo dough to one that is rolled ladyfinger-style with crushed nuts. Don’t overlook the savory side of the menu, which includes meze like smoky baba ghanoush and za’atar-dusted labneh, chicken and lamb kebabs, and red lentil soup. The cafe employs several other Syrian refugees who have made new homes in Providence. Baklava at Aleppo Sweets Long before Rhode Island’s flourishing brewing scene, there was Narragansett Beer. For about a hundred years, starting in 1890, the brand’s iconic lager was made in the Providence area until nonlocal corporate ownership moved operations. It was a big deal when, after decades in exile and about 15 years of planning, current owner Mark Hellendrug returned the beer to its birthplace in 2021 with a shiny new brewery. The brand’s first female head brewer, Lee Lord, now makes a wide range of styles, including fruited sours and juicy IPAs. Inside the bar at Narragansett Brewery Narragansett Brewery “Modern” is in the name, but this diner serves up pure nostalgia. Take a seat at the counter or a booth, soak up the old-timey atmosphere, and order up some custard French toast, a Western omelet, or one of the more than 20 specials offered each day. Rhode Islanders love diners because they are said to have invented them; the restaurant genre can be traced back to Walter Scott, who sold sandwiches out of a horse-drawn covered wagon outside of the Providence Journal offices in the 1870s. Modern Diner is equally noteworthy: the Sterling Streamliner-style building, first manufactured in the ’30s, was the first diner listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Outside the classic Modern Diner Modern Diner This spot serves the quintessential Rhode Island treat known as the hot wiener (also known as a “New York system” for its Coney Island origins). Order one “all the way” and you’ll get a pork and veal hot dog enveloped in a steamed bun and slathered with meat sauce, mustard, and onions, plus a sprinkle of celery salt. Pair your wieners with a coffee milk for the ultimate savory-sweet combo. Operated by the Stevens family for 75 years, Olneyville New York System has received a James Beard America’s Classics Award and many local accolades. Often busy after the bars close, the restaurant is open until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 a.m. every other day of the week. 18 Plainfield St Inside Troop Troop PVD If you could turn a block party into a restaurant, you’d end up with Troop. Inspired by hip-hop culture, skateboarding, and street food from around the world, this colorful, graffitied restaurant is run by a group of partners, including chef Jason Timothy and Revival Brewing owner Sean Larkin (whose beers are on tap). The food menu features several vegan options, such as spicy-sweet wok-charred cauliflower and a fried tofu banh mi. For carnivores, there’s an oversized cheeseburger and fall-off-the-bone jerk chicken. Drinks include the tequila-based BLM Cocktail, with $4 from each sale benefiting a local nonprofit dedicated to diversity and inclusion. 60 Valley St Don’t let the name Nick confuse you; chef-owner Derek Wagner is at the helm here. Almost 20 years ago, fresh out of Johnson & Wales culinary school, then 24-year-old Wagner bought the diner from its longtime owner. He kept the name but freshened up the kitchen with a modern menu and local sourcing. It’s been one of the busiest restaurants in the city ever since, so expect to wait for a table or make a reservation, especially for weekend brunch. Nab a counter seat to get a front-row view into the open kitchen where you can watch Wagner and his crew crank out everything from eggs Benedict to house-made chicken pate to cornmeal-fried Rhode Island scup. Pair your order with a side of crazy-good grilled bread. 500 Broadway Margherita pizza at Costantino’s Costantino’s Run by Alan Costantino since the 1970s, this Italian food emporium is an ideal place to kick off a jaunt through famed Federal Hill, Providence’s historically Italian enclave. Like a smaller, mom-and-pop version of Eataly, Venda is filled to the brim with gastronomic delights, including hunks of Parmigiano-Reggiano and aged Asiago, fresh and frozen pasta (try the popular lobster ravioli), and pantry staples. If the weather’s nice, order an Aperol spritz and margherita pizza from the restaurant arm of the business, Costantino’s, to enjoy by the fountain on Venda’s outdoor patio in DePasquale Square. 275 Atwells Ave Fried dough is at its finest at Knead Doughnuts, where bakers transform butter, sugar, and flour into glorious old-fashioned, brioche-style, and cake doughnuts. Since opening in 2016, the business has been steadily growing by delivering its artisan sweets to many coffee shops around the state. Pair an airy vanilla-glazed brioche or a dense chocolate chip old-fashioned with a Bolt Coffee nitro cold brew (Bolt co-owners Todd Mackey and Brian Gibb are part-owners of Knead). While the Elmgrove Avenue outpost has a neighborhood coffee shop feel, stop by the West End’s Cromwell Street location on the weekend to get a peek at the production space. 55 Cromwell St Topping off with some fresh cheese Oberlin Chef-owner Benjamin Sukle made a name for himself at his first restaurant, Birch, where he served thoughtful, labor-intensive, New England-by-way-of-Noma dishes. That restaurant closed during the pandemic, but the chef is still at work with Rhode Island seafood and produce at his more casual second restaurant, Oberlin. The menu centers around hand-crafted pastas and just-caught local fish, such as fluke and scup. They’re sliced raw and garnished minimally with a sprinkle of salt and a drizzle of olive oil, or served whole, grilled or roasted. Sukle’s dishes are designed for sharing, so you’ll want to round out your order with a veg (try the Tokyo turnip Caesar) and a seasonal pasta, like summertime’s lumache with sweet corn, lonza, shishitos, and mint. 186 Union St Beautifully battered fried fish Dune Brothers Seafood Imagine a classic seafood shack by the beach, update it, and bring it to the city. That’s essentially what chefs Jason Hegedus and Nicholas Gillespie did a few years ago when they opened Dune Brothers, currently operating as a long-term pop-up out of an adorable red shack on wheels. Their takeout menu is built around traceable local seafood and includes indulgent options like buttery New England clam chowder with deep-fried clam cakes, two types of fish sandwiches, and both lobster and crab rolls. There’s outdoor seating, or you can take your briny bounty to go. 239 Dyer St Manchamanteles mole Dolores Chef Maria Meza arrived in the U.S. in 1992 with a dream to open a restaurant. Almost 30 years later, she runs two successful eateries in Providence with her son Joaquin. While their first restaurant, El Rancho Grande, is small and casual, Dolores is like a sophisticated younger sister. Here, the Mezas cook meals inspired by Maria’s childhood in Oaxaca and Puebla: complex, long-simmered moles; hand-ground heirloom corn tortillas folded into pockets and filled with cheese to make tetelas; and an array of tamales that are also available frozen to take home. Joaquin runs the bar, which is stocked with Oaxacan mezcal and other regional spirits. 100 Hope St Ham and melted Swiss on Mallorca sweet bread Little Sister Little Sister owner Milena Pagán first won over Rhode Islanders’ stomachs with her artisan bagel shop Rebelle. Her second venture, Little Sister, is primarily a daytime cafe, offering flavor-packed lunch options and expertly made baked goods. The menu is inspired by the flavors of Latin America and Puerto Rico, where she grew up. Favorites include chicken empanadas, Cubano sandwiches, and dulce de leche cake. Decorated with tropical flair and plenty of plants, the inviting cafe offers the perfect place to escape, especially during long New England winters. 737 Hope St Pizza, drinks, and curly fries at Pizza Marvin Pizza Marvin Bartender Jesse Hedberg has put together many of the state’s top-rated cocktail programs over the last decade. Naturally his latest project, the retro-styled Pizza Marvin — operated with co-owner and chef Robert Andreozzi — serves drinks that you won’t find anywhere else in town. You can enjoy his takeout-friendly bottled pizza Negroni with one of Andreozzi’s charred New Haven-inspired pizzas and sides such as a salad of coppa and cantaloupe. For a taste of true luxury, pair an order of raw littlenecks, which are abundant in local waters, with a bottle of premier cru Champagne. 468 Wickenden St Often seen cooking on local morning TV on The Rhode Show, chef Nick Rabar exudes so much love for Rhode Island cuisine that you’d never guess he actually grew up in New York. After spending years working in kitchens in Providence, Rabar opened his own restaurant, Avenue N, with his wife Tracy in East Providence about a decade ago. Like the original, this new Providence outpost brings fine dining flair to a generally approachable, something-for-everyone menu. Go casual with a steak and mushroom pizza or high-end with delicately fried local Walrus and Carpenter oysters dabbed with horseradish-mustard sauce. Also look for Rabar’s version of stuffies. 959 Hope St When he first arrived in the Ocean State, chef Jake Rojas ran a highly regarded farm-to-table restaurant in Newport with his wife, Kelly Ann. More recently, the Texas native has been using his cooking skills at his always-busy taquerias. Rojas’s quick-service mix-and-match menu invites you to choose from an assortment of fillings (chipotle-braised potatoes, al pastor, carne asada, lengua), toppings, and formats (tacos, burritos, tortas, bowls). No matter what you pick, it comes out of the kitchen fast and flavorful. Pair anything with a house mezcal margarita, and in warmer months eat on the restaurant’s string light-lined outdoor patio. 146 Ives St Baklava at Aleppo Sweets Aleppo Sweets Youssef Akhtarini learned to bake as a teenager growing up in Aleppo, Syria. After fleeing the war-torn city and moving to Providence, Akhtarini opened Aleppo Sweets in 2019 with help from his wife, Reem. At this bakery-cafe you’ll find nearly a dozen different varieties of light and crunchy Syrian-style baklava, from a version with whole pistachios wrapped in purses of phyllo dough to one that is rolled ladyfinger-style with crushed nuts. Don’t overlook the savory side of the menu, which includes meze like smoky baba ghanoush and za’atar-dusted labneh, chicken and lamb kebabs, and red lentil soup. The cafe employs several other Syrian refugees who have made new homes in Providence. 107 Ives St Inside the bar at Narragansett Brewery Narragansett Brewery Long before Rhode Island’s flourishing brewing scene, there was Narragansett Beer. For about a hundred years, starting in 1890, the brand’s iconic lager was made in the Providence area until nonlocal corporate ownership moved operations. It was a big deal when, after decades in exile and about 15 years of planning, current owner Mark Hellendrug returned the beer to its birthplace in 2021 with a shiny new brewery. The brand’s first female head brewer, Lee Lord, now makes a wide range of styles, including fruited sours and juicy IPAs. 271 Tockwotton St Outside the classic Modern Diner Modern Diner “Modern” is in the name, but this diner serves up pure nostalgia. Take a seat at the counter or a booth, soak up the old-timey atmosphere, and order up some custard French toast, a Western omelet, or one of the more than 20 specials offered each day. Rhode Islanders love diners because they are said to have invented them; the restaurant genre can be traced back to Walter Scott, who sold sandwiches out of a horse-drawn covered wagon outside of the Providence Journal offices in the 1870s. Modern Diner is equally noteworthy: the Sterling Streamliner-style building, first manufactured in the ’30s, was the first diner listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 364 East Ave

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