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Vecoplan

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About Vecoplan

Vecoplan develops produces and markets machinery and plants for shredding, conveying and processing primary and secondary raw materials gained in recycling processes. It is based in Bad Marienberg, Germany.

Headquarters Location

Vor der Bitz 10

Bad Marienberg, 56470,

Germany

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Vecoplan Patents

Vecoplan has filed 10 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Actuators
  • Cooling technology
  • Energy conversion
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

2/21/2014

1/12/2016

Automotive transmission technologies, Automation, Mechanical power transmission, Electric power conversion, Electrical engineering

Grant

Application Date

2/21/2014

Grant Date

1/12/2016

Title

Related Topics

Automotive transmission technologies, Automation, Mechanical power transmission, Electric power conversion, Electrical engineering

Status

Grant

Latest Vecoplan News

Schnitzer fends off baseball-related lawsuit

Oct 4, 2022

Schnitzer fends off baseball-related lawsuit Court overturns attempt by Oakland Athletics to restrict shredding and shipping activity. October 4, 2022 An appeals court in California has ruled in favor of Portland-based Schnitzer Steel Industries in its effort to fend off a lawsuit from baseball team the Oakland Athletics. Although the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) has been known to monitor  metals shredding operations carefully, in this case that agency’s previous classification of Schnitzer metal grades and residue as non-hazardous worked in the recycling company’s favor. The California First District Court of Appeal cited the DTSC classification in overturning a previous ruling in the baseball team’s favor. According to an online report by the San Francisco Chronicle, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeal ruled “there is no threat to human health or the environment from managing treated metal-shredder waste as non-hazardous,” said Justice Alison Tucher, author of the unanimous ruling. The decades-old auto and metal shredding plant has been in the crosshairs  of the Oakland baseball team amidst its proposed stadium development plans for waterfront property at Howard Terminal, near the Schnitzer property. According to the newspaper, Schnitzer is not showing a willingness to move from its Oakland site and is among a group of waterfront ballpark opponents that also includes the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association and some trucking organizations. For now, the Court of Appeal ruling overturns a county judge’s 2021 finding in favor of the Athletics, who have not yet indicated whether they will keep the lawsuit alive. Kent County, Michigan, launches S.O.R.T. program The pilot program has led to a permanent installation in Rockford, Michigan, that educates residents on proper recyclables disposal. October 3, 2022 Michigan's Kent County Department of Public Works (DPW) has launched a pilot program, called Separate Out Trash Recycling (S.O.R.T. ), to help residents divert resources away from landfills by placing their recyclables into the right bin. According to a news release from the DPW, the program helps guide where recyclables should go using colored bins that separate recycling and trash. After a temporary pilot program in 2021 using the branded bins at the Rockford Outdoor Refreshment Area in Rockford, Michigan, DPW is installing permanent S.O.R.T. bins in all municipal buildings and parks. “The S.O.R.T. program has been a major success in Rockford, and we take great pride in helping divert [scrap] from landfills whenever and however we can,” says Thad Beard, city manager for Rockford. “The consistent and uniform access to the S.O.R.T. bins helps our residents think twice about where their [scrap] goes and provides education on recycling and [scrap] in our community. We look forward to the continued use of this program.”   By using the S.O.R.T. bins, users are helping reduce landfilled scrap and bring Kent County closer to its goal of reducing landfill waste by 90 percent by 2030. The DPW is hoping to expand the use of S.O.R.T. bins to other communities using the blueprint of the Rockford pilot program. “This program is a great example of how the community and local government can work together to divert [scrap] from landfills,” says Katelyn Kikstra, waste reduction educator with the DPW. “We applaud Rockford for making this commitment to a more sustainable community and the Rockford Sustainability Committee for keeping the project moving. We look forward to partnering with other groups to continue the success of the S.O.R.T. program.”   Those interested in using S.O.R.T. bins at their offices, businesses, schools, places of worship or upcoming social events can visit the DPW’s website to submit a request for materials to set up the bins. The DPW offers a sign maker tool and vinyl wraps to place on waste bins that let people know what should go in each bin. The DPW will provide input on options available in your community for organics, recycling and trash collection. Vecoplan unveils VRZ preshredders October 3, 2022 Bad Marienberg, Germany-based Vecoplan AG has unveiled its VRZ series preshredders for processing domestic and commercial scrap, promising efficient, yet low-maintenance operation to break up and shred bulky materials. The company says it placed emphasis on a rotor that combines sickle-shaped ripping teeth for safer operation that also can shred materials laden with extraneous items, such as minerals or nails, powered by its HiTorc drive. Unlike cutting tips in other machines, the VRZ’s ripping teeth are armored. “[Vecoplan development specialists] have created a machine that is not only resistant to extraneous items, but is also robust, reliable and low-maintenance,” Recycling-Waste Division Head of Application Technology Cathrine Rekett says. “Re-armoring the ripper teeth when they’re worn is more time-consuming than changing cutting tips and counter knives, but their running times are much longer. The bottom line is that this significantly reduces downtimes.”  The torque drive has no mechanical components, such as belts, clutches or hydraulic units, which Vecoplan says leads to less maintenance than hydraulic drives. The company adds that the HiTorc drive can achieve a high efficiency level because there is less mass to be propelled, saving energy costs. The drive’s output is 2x138 kilowatts. “During development, we wanted to keep operating and maintenance costs as low as possible for the plant operator,” Rekett says. Components such as wear-resistant and replaceable sealing elements at the rotor and side wall prevent materials from becoming lodged between the front surface of the rotor and the machine housing. Vecoplan says its optimized design means the cutting frame and rotors can be replaced quickly and time-consuming maintenance, such as reinforcing welding work, can be performed outside the machine, reducing downtime. “Our VRZ is designed to remain operational for as long as possible, even if wear does occur,” Rekett says. Vecoplan says its VRZ 2500, for example, has an open cutting table that allows stones and other extraneous materials to fall through the cutting unit without shutting down the machine, and that extensive practical tests with different materials have shown successful continuous operation. The VRZ series has a modular design, and customers can choose from several options to configure their machines, such as various cutting units like cutting tables and rotors that can be easily replaced to adjust the VRZ to a specific particle size or usage scenario. Clariter will supply its oils and solvents, produced from recycled plastic, over a five-year cooperation period. October 3, 2022 In both companies’ drives to transform the petrochemical industry, Clariter and Count Energy Trading have entered a five-year strategic supply agreement that will allow Clariter to supply its oils and solvents made from recycled plastic. Based on current market values, the agreement is estimated to be worth up to $1.4 billion in future product sales, the companies say. Luxembourg-based Clariter will use its four commercial plants in Europe and the Middle East to develop its oils, waxes and solvents, which it gets through recycling most types of plastic scrap. The company says various industries can use these as inputs for more than 1,000 sustainably produced industrial and consumer products, including printer ink, shoe polish, paints and candles. “Clariter is the only chemical recycler that produces high-grade oils, solvents and waxes,” CEO Ran Sharon says. “The agreement with Count is a major milestone in our journey to rid the world of plastic waste and replace fossil fuel-based products. Count’s reputation and network will help us rapidly expand into many new product markets.”  A team of traders in energy products and renewables based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Count says it strives to promote a circular economy and sustainability from different angles, focusing on the energy transition; transparent environmental, social and governance (ESG) reporting; carbon disclosure; and decarbonized transportation options. “The partnership with Clariter supports and boosts our efforts of bridging the sustainability transition in our industry,” Count CEO Jeroen Baaima says. “We are excited to bring to our customers Clariter’s circular oils and solvents, empowering them further towards a more sustainable future.”  © Stuart Key | dreamstime.com East Lansing, Michigan, will equip its recycling trucks with cameras to track contamination. October 3, 2022 The city of East Lansing, Michigan, has joined the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE); The Recycling Partnership, Falls Church, Virginia; and almost 100 other Michigan communities to help residents recycle a greater quantity of material more efficiently. Starting in September, a six-month pilot project began with involvement from the city, EGLE, The Recycling Partnership; Prairie Robotics, Regina, Saskatchewan; and The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. The project is a modified version of The Recycling Partnership’s Feet on the Street  cart tagging initiative—a communitywide project to improve the quality of recycling in curbside carts by providing residents with personalized, real-time curbside recycling education and feedback. Traditionally, this is done by someone tagging carts on the street if contaminants are found within. In East Lansing , instead of someone reviewing contents and placing a tag on curbside recycling carts, Prairie Robotics will retrofit the city’s recycling collection trucks with camera technology. Those cameras will document whether contamination enters the recycling cart, and residents will receive a mailer with information about what and how to recycle correctly. “Recycling is not only the right thing to do but also the smart thing to do,” East Lansing Environmental Specialist Cliff Walls says. “We are excited the city was selected for this first-of-its-kind project in the U.S. by EGLE, The Recycling Partnership and Prairie Robotics . Recycling properly saves our taxpayers money by reducing costly damage to equipment as well as the expense of sending contaminated, otherwise recyclable material to the landfill. We know residents want to recycle the right way and, through this campaign, we are providing them feedback to do just that.” Through $28,000 in grant funding and technical support from The Recycling Partnership, East Lansing will implement a comprehensive education and outreach strategy. “The Recycling Partnership is excited to continue working with EGLE and Michigan communities to improve residential recycling across the state,” The Recycling Partnership Community Program Manager Cassandra Ford says. “On this project, in particular, in East Lansing, [with] the addition of Prairie Robotics technology and The Ohio State University providing statistical analysis on results, we expect to receive comprehensive conclusions on the effectiveness of combining camera technology with educational outreach to improve recycling.”   This year, more than $815,000 in grant funding is being allocated to 14 recycling program grantees, representing more than 369,000 households across Michigan. These 14 grantees are building on the impact of a 2021 project with a similar goal to improve recycling across Michigan, which reached 100 communities and expanded Michigan’s award-winning “Know It Before You Throw It” campaign, aimed at increasing the state’s recycling rate to 30 percent by 2025. “EGLE is excited to continue working with The Recycling Partnership and Michigan communities to continue to improve residential recycling through these quality improvement projects,” EGLE Materials Management Division Recycling Specialist Emily Freeman says. “We all have a role to play in the circular economy, and these grants will help even more Michigan communities engage with their residents and improve the quality of recyclable materials collected in curbside and drop-off programs across Michigan.” Developed by The Recycling Partnership, the traditional Feet on the Street program has been implemented in more than 70 communities around the nation, with some communities seeing as much as a 57 percent decrease of nonrecyclables in recycling and an average of a 27 percent increase in the overall capture of quality recyclables. Since 2014, The Recycling Partnership says it has diverted 500 million pounds of new recyclables from landfills, saved 968 million gallons of water, avoided more than 500,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions and driven significant reductions in targeted contamination rates.

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Vecoplan Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • Where is Vecoplan's headquarters?

    Vecoplan's headquarters is located at Vor der Bitz 10, Bad Marienberg.

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