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UKIP is a political party in the United Kingdom. UKIP members represent in the general elections in the United Kingdom. It is based in Bristol, England.

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Amid 'Sleaze' Clampdown UK MPs Could Be Barred From Consultancy Roles by Commons Standards Watchdog

Nov 8, 2021

Amid 'Sleaze' Clampdown UK MPs Could Be Barred From Consultancy Roles by Commons Standards Watchdog Amid 'Sleaze' Clampdown UK MPs Could Be Barred From Consultancy Roles by Commons Standards Watchdog Ahead of the emergency debate on the House of Commons standards system Monday, MPs have been calling for a full independent public inquiry into mounting... 08.11.2021, Sputnik International 2021-11-08T11:44+0000 https://cdnn1.img.sputniknews.com/img/107864/33/1078643320_0:141:1800:1154_1920x0_80_0_0_0dd6d33e7bdd1eaa7bdd908c0bade74f.jpg The UK House of Commons standards committee is said to be mulling plans to restrict MPs from having consultancy jobs to earn extra cash like former Conservative MP Owen Paterson’s amid calls to clampdown on “sleaze”, reported the Daily Mail. The limitations on “moonlighting” outside their parliamentary duties, purportedly to be decided within weeks, could potentially affect over 30 MPs. It is understood that a number of members of the standards committee, which is due to publish its report on the code of conduct for MPs, are convinced that restrictions on such aspects as paid consultancy work must be tightened after the Paterson scandal. The Former MP former for North Shropshire was found to have committed an “egregious” breach of lobbying rules by an investigation carried out by Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, Kathryn Stone. While the committee has reportedly not yet discussed its final recommendations, one option suggested is to bar MPs from having second jobs, similar to the measures of this nature in place in the House of Lords and the Scottish and Welsh parliaments. One of the standards watchdog’s members, Commons speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle, is expected to put forward his proposal as part of a review of the House of Commons' standards procedures amid this Monday’s emergency parliamentary debate over the Paterson scandal. Dozens of MPs earn tens of thousands of pounds annually for their consulting and advising efforts for a range of companies. Analysis of the Register of Members' Financial Interests, cited by the outlet, reveals that 34 sitting MPs have listed payments from companies for whom they provide consulting work, with “moonlighting” earnings topping their yearly parliamentary salary of £81,932 many-fold. There are no rules against MPs receiving remuneration for advising external businesses. However, they must comply with the rules that require them to record the earnings in their register of interests, while strictly refraining from lobbying the Government on behalf of those businesses.The issue brought up now due to the Owen Paterson scandal is not new, as three years ago the Committee on Standards in Public Life recommended a ban on MPs working as consultants, stating: ‘Westminster Storm’ The report comes as the government of Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been fending of a barrage of criticism over its handling of the Paterson case. Former Conservative MP Owen Paterson had been facing a 30-day parliamentary suspension over an “egregious case of paid advocacy” after Kathyrn Stone, the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, last week recommended the disciplinary measure in a report approved by a group of cross-party MPs on the standards committee. Paterson, said the report, had lobbied on behalf of two companies, diagnostics company Randox and sausage-maker Lynn’s Country Foods, which paid him more than £100,000 annually. However, Boris Johnson's government conceived a plan to block Paterson’s suspension by tearing up Parliament's anti-sleaze rules on 3 November. An amendment superseding the planned vote on Paterson’s case suggested a new select committee be set up to examine the parliamentary standards system and recommend whether to review Paterson’s misdeeds. The House voted 250 to 232 to approve the amendment on Wednesday, her was forced into a U-turn amid public outcry the following day. Once Paterson realised he would have to face a fresh vote on the 30-day suspension, he announced he would resign to leave “the cruel world of politics”. Boris Johnson and his ministers have been left facing tremendous backlash for "wallowing in sleaze". Furthermore, the government was accused of trying to “bully” the Parliamentary Standards Commissioner after Business secretary Kwasi Kwarteng indicated, in a Sky News interview Thursday, that “it’s difficult to see what the future of the commissioner is, given the fact that we’re reviewing the process… it’s up to the commissioner to decide her position”. Labour, the SNP and Liberal Democrats have all deplored the government’s heavy-handed attempt to shield Patterson. Labour Party leader Sir Keir Starmer demanded Johnson apologise to the nation over Owen Paterson sleaze row ahead of the emergency Commons debate, requested by the Lib Dem chief whip, Wendy Chamberlain. He insisted the PM was “trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country." However, the Owen Paterson lobbying scandal was dismissed as a mere "Westminster storm in a teacup" by UK Environment Secretary George Eustice. "I know you may put it to me that way, others - opposition leaders and so on, and opposition politicians - will no doubt say that, but I don't agree. I've been up here in Glasgow at COP, where some really big decisions are being taken, big, important decisions around the world on a big challenge like climate change. What we've seen is a sort of Westminster storm in a teacup, if I may say so," he said on Trevor Phillips On Sunday. . anne00marie They should only have vocational MPs and banned from any form of 'cash for favours'. Not just the Tories who are at it,. 0 Ahead of the emergency debate on the House of Commons standards system Monday, MPs have been calling for a full independent public inquiry into mounting allegations of “sleaze” and cronyism within the government of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the wake of the Owen Paterson lobbying scandal. The UK House of Commons standards committee is said to be mulling plans to restrict MPs from having consultancy jobs to earn extra cash like former Conservative MP Owen Paterson’s amid calls to clampdown on “sleaze” , reported the Daily Mail. The limitations on “moonlighting” outside their parliamentary duties, purportedly to be decided within weeks, could potentially affect over 30 MPs. It is understood that a number of members of the standards committee, which is due to publish its report on the code of conduct for MPs, are convinced that restrictions on such aspects as paid consultancy work must be tightened after the Paterson scandal. © AFP 2021 / JUSTIN TALLIS Conservative MP Owen Paterson (R) and former UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage arrive for a press conference on the impact of Brexit on the fisheries industry in London on February 28, 2017 Conservative MP Owen Paterson (R) and former UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage arrive for a press conference on the impact of Brexit on the fisheries industry in London on February 28, 2017

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