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About Texas Research Institute Austin

Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Automated, Rapid Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) of Large Scale Composite Structures. The abstract given for this project is as follows: The manual inspection of large composite structures on Navy aircraft such as the KC- 130J wing trailing edge requires significant manpower and calendar time. This reduces the availability of assets to the warfighter and increases the life cycle cost of the aircraft. The team of Texas Research Institute, Austin Inc. (TRI/Austin), Computational Tools, and Wesdyne propose to develop robotic nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques using ultrasonic arrays, and to design and implement a new Automated Defect Analysis (ADA) to significantly reduce the manpower required to accomplish these necessary inspections. Wesdyne's IntraSpectTM large area robotic scanners provide the hardware platform for the solution. Combining the robotic scanner with a linear ultrasonic array provides the fastest implementation possible of the most sensitive NDI method for typical composite aerospace structures. The TRI Team will then implement a new set of Automated Defect Analysis algorithms to analyze the data as it is being acquired. The ADA will be developed as an add-on to the existing TRI Team's NDIToolboxTM software, to be integrated into the IntraSpectTM platform and transparent to the end user.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Modeling of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Processes for Reliability Assessment. The abstract given for this project is as follows: The time and cost to perform a comprehensive probability of detection (POD) study are significant and burdensome to the process of deploying new inspection methods and techniques. The complexity and cost of this effort require the development of model- assisted methods to determine the POD of new inspection methods and techniques as they are introduced and maintained as part of a cost-effective maintenance process. TRI/Austin has teamed with other key organizations to demonstrate and validate model- assisted POD (MAPOD) as a technology to speed the development and reduce the costs of POD studies. With participation from Iowa State University's Center for NDE, Computational Tools Inc., and NDE Technologies Inc.; the TRI Team will design and execute an experimental program to validate models of ultrasonic inspection (UT) of titanium components, and to then validate the MAPOD approach to POD estimation via comparison to a traditional MIL-HDBK-1823 study. The TRI Team will commercialize the validated UT software as part of the existing UTSIM commercial product. In addition, the MAPOD process will be documented and supporting software developed and commercialized to facilitate the use of POD methods from traditional MIL-HDBK-1823 analyses to MAPOD methods.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: High-Temperature, Abrasion-Resistant Coating. The abstract given for this project is as follows: The F-35 JSF aircraft imposes a demanding set of reliability requirements, particularly in regard to operation temperature. Millions of dollars are spent every year repairing coatings that cannot withstand high temperatures while maintaining mechanical properties, including those on BMI composite parts for the JSF. The current Teflon-filled coating on the F-35 aft boom covers abrades easily during use at 450oF and short durations at 650'F. TRI/Austin proposes an innovative coating approach to utilize a thermally stable vinyl functional polysilazane binder with an inorganic, high temperature, pigment package that will have superior thermal stability coupled with outstanding abrasion resistance. This coating can be spray or brush applied, and test formulations have already shown excellent results. The technical objectives are to develop optimum coating formulations for polymer coated BMI composites and demonstrate superior thermal protection; confirm that the coating provides excellent adhesion, flexibility, and color as well as resistance to abrasion, chemicals, corrosion, and impact; and investigate test methods to confirm the coating's resistance to abrasion at elevated temperatures. This new high-temperature, abrasion-resistant coating should find many applications in military and commercial aircraft as well as in automotive parts, industrial equipment, and improving commodity materials.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: High Speed Penetration Modeling. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Penetrating warheads filled with High Explosives (HE) can prove ineffective in destroying deeply buried and harden military complexes. The objective of this proposed effort is to develop and empirically validate Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations that can accurately represent materials and assemblies response to high speed impacts and harsh environments. Dynamic FEM on representative test articles containing HE will be generated using LS-DYNA, which will give load paths, stress distribution, strains, and component deformation at various impact velocities. The developed LS-DYNA impact simulations will be compared to penetrator tests on test articles containing simulant HE materials at the University of Texas Institute for Advanced Technology. Design of Experiment (DOE) will be conducted to replicate thermal and vibration events resulting from storage and field-use that can adversely affect mechanical or electrical components' function; small-scaled samples filled with HE or HE simulant will be prepared and aged to access the potential effects of micro cracks or voids on detonation characteristics. Analytical tests will be conducted to evaluate changes in HE after accelerated life testing. The results of this research will be improved performance penetrating warheads that are more reliable, predictable, and deliver maximize lethality to harden complexes.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Materials Development for High Performance Solid Rocket Motor Cases. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Extreme elevated temperatures are reached in solid rocket motors (SRM) applications which have traditionally required the use of both interior and exterior thermal insulation materials. The development of more thermally stable composites would mitigate the need for these insulation layers. TRI/Austin is teaming with a major producer of SRM's to develop a multifunctional material approach to address this problem. Three technical objectives will be pursued simultaneously to address thermal stability issues of the entire composite system, not simply the matrix resin. By addressing the properties of both the matrix resin and the reinforcement interface, significant improvements in overall composite performance at elevated temperatures are anticipated. The next generation rocket systems will rely on technology options that provide inert component size and weight reductions. This motor design approach will enable motors to carry more propellant thereby doubling any potential benefits (less weight/more energy storage) for Future Strategic Strike ICBM designs. The proposed multifunctional material approach can improve the matrix glass transition temperature of the composite case system, while eliminating the need for traditional elastomeric insulation material system.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Shape Changing, Reduced Density, Towed Array Hose. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Two problems affect Navy submarine towed arrays. The first problem is damage imparted to the array components by the handling system. The second problem is the noise generated by hose oscillation and turbulence that develops during submarine turns; the circular cylinder hose experiences a cross flow which causes vortex shedding. TRI/Austin proposes to address each problem separately and then integrate the results into a final proposed towed array hose design. The damage problem can be addressed by increasing the internal pressure in the towed array hose. The hose wall material will have to be less dense and still meet all of the performance requirements for the towed array. TRI/Austin will call upon a significant bank of material development expertise and experience in developing rho-c materials to meet demanding performance requirements, finding and formulating the right combination of thermoplastics and additives to meet the requirements of the towed array hose application. Three strum suppression mechanisms will be analyzed and evaluated. The analysis will be performed using 3D computational fluid dynamics. The best performing strum suppressor, by analytical modeling, will be tested in a tow tank to verify the model conforms to test results.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Affordable High Rate Manufacturing Process for High Density Sub-Projectiles. The abstract given for this project is as follows: There is a requirement for lethal high density sub-projectiles that are affordable. Simple shapes, which are relatively inexpensive, lose lethality because of poor ballistic attributes. Machining these simple shapes to change attributes, in order to enhance their lethality, significantly increases the cost of the sub-projectile. TRI/Austin will deliver an optimized design for a high density sub-projectile that meets all of the Navyi¿½s performance requirements, and which is less expensive to manufacture than machining or sintering approaches. The baseline design has been verified through computational analysis of launch and flight modes, including dynamic analysis of the launch loads, and the aerodynamic heating and mechanical loads during ejection. TRI/Austin is adapting highly commercial manufacturing processes to the manufacturing of sub-projectiles. The transition and commercialization of the proposed design will be rapid. The baseline design is adaptable to a variety of penetrator materials and geometries, and the manufacturing process can be readily converted from one projectile design to another. The flight performance of the sub-projectile can be enhanced, higher release altitude, longer flight time, by changing component materials. The manufacturing rate is a function of manufacturing system scaling; hundreds of thousands of sub-projectiles per year are possible with relatively small capital investment.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Improved Reliability and Multi-modal Capability of Non-Destructive Inspection for Cracks and Corrosion. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Texas Research Institute/Austin (TRI/Austin) has teamed with Computational Tools, Wesdyne, and NDE Technologies to propose the development and demonstration of multi- mode inspection concepts that will: reduce the cost of inspection improve the reliability of inspection, and enable faster deployment of new inspection technologies. The TRI Team will develop innovative inspection approaches using our experience in multi-mode NDI, NDI modeling, and in the execution of automated on-aircraft robotically scanned NDI. Within the Phase I effort, we will demonstrate all aspects of this modern NDI concept by developing and validating ultrasonic and eddy current techniques for a multiple layer structure with fasteners, typical of large area inspection requirements currently being addressed by manual inspection. Models will be used to optimize NDI technique that can be implemented in array designs, with simultaneous UT and ET array scanning, offering order of magnitude increases in inspection speed over existing single sensor techniques. Automated signal/data processing will be used to assist the interpretation of the large data sets. The TRI Team includes expertise in all aspects of the modern inspection process, including active participation of vendors able to immediately transition the research outcomes into useable tools for the Air Force depot environment.BENEFIT: Texas Research Institute/Austin (TRI/Austin) has teamed with Computational Tools, Wesdyne, and NDE Technologies to propose the development and demonstration of multi- mode inspection concepts that will: reduce the cost of inspection improve the reliability of inspection, and enable faster deployment of new inspection technologies. Cost reduction is achieved by reduction of labor hours. Aging aircraft are requiring additional inspections and the labor burden is increasing. The lack of confidence in the ability of manual inspections to first achieve 100% coverage and second to achieve the desired POD is causing the Air Force to perform redundant inspections in some cases. This would be eliminated in most situations by using the multi-mode inspection concept proposed in this document. Improved inspection reliability is achieved by two main facets of the TRI Team program. First, robotic scanning and computerized data acquisition provide the ability to achieve 100% coverage and the ability to audit the results to ensure this is the case. These are both critical issues in overall inspection reliability. Second, robotic systems reduce the degrees of freedom associated with manual probe manipulation, known to be a source of reduced POD. Enabling faster deployment of new inspection technologies is achieved because robotic scanners for inspection contain most of the capital cost of implementing a new inspection mode. Once the scanner and data acquisition hardware has been purchased, the capital costs of implementation of new inspection techniques is limited to the sensor costs, and does not need to include new black boxes with each deployment. TRI/Austin has engaged Wesdyne as a member of the TRI Team. Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Aircraft fatigue damage inspection. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Currently to inspect for fatigue damage around fasteners in multi-layer structures requires either removing the fastener entirely or a perfect sealant layer between the layers for ultrasonic testing. We propose developing a novel inspection system that uses acoustic emission to inspect the multi-layer structures. Our approach does not require removing, modifying, or altering in any way the fastener nor the multi-layer structure. During Phase I we will develop the initial prototypical design of our inspection system, construct a prototype, and demonstrate its ability to detect corner flaws in the multi-layer structure around fasteners. Future efforts will be devoted to moving from the lab to the field to provide the Air Force with a practical, easy-to-use inspection solution. TRI is currently using the LAHMP AE system to monitor fatigue cracks in C-5 skins. The lessons learned in this internally funded C-5 project will form the basis for the proposed Phase I work. BENEFIT:Studies have shown that reducing the number of fastener removals required for inspection can save the Air Force millions, as much as $65 million dollars for the B-1B alone. Since our system drops the number of fastener removals to zero, we anticipate that even more significant savings can be realized by the Air Force. In addition, due to the ubiquitous nature of multi-layer structures in aerospace, we anticipate similar savings can be realized by the Navy, Marines, and commercial airlines.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Cosmetic Coating to Protect Unclothed Skin from Thermal (Burn) Injury. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Currently, other than protective clothing there is no viable method for directly shielding dermal tissues from thermal insults. Thermal injuries to unprotected eyes and hands result in diminished full force projection for our troops. TRI/Austin is proposing an innovative protective hypoallergenic coating that can be applied topically to skin affording an improved level of burn protection for warfighters in fires and explosive events. It is anticipated the new burn protective skin paint will reduce effective skin exposure of 40 kW/m2 heat flux to less than 10 kW/m2. A systematic development and testing program will result in a non-irritating skin coating with heat absorbing and intumescing properties. Experimental design techniques will be utilized for systematically evaluating formulation and processing components resulting in a low cost, non-irritating, camouflage paint compatible, cosmetic coating to protect against thermal injury. The effectiveness of our technical approach will be demonstrated in the course of laboratory based testing including reducing the effective heat flux, skin irritation testing, compatibility with the extant camouflage paint, thermal analysis, and formulation performance when tested using MIL-DTL-32000 procedures. This systematic experimental design development approach has proved the most effective method for the development of new materials and processes.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Assessment and Modeling of Shock and Vibration Performance of Lead-Free Alloys. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Lead based solders have been used for decades to make connections in electronic assemblies and has an established reliably record in high performance applications. As industry moves away from the use of lead in electronic assemblies to SAC alloys. Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Development and Validation of Tin-Whisker Growth Model and Accelerated Testing. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Reliabilities of lead-free soldered assemblies and surface finishes are different from heritage tin-lead eutectic alloys when used in high-performance or long-lived military and aerospace applications. Single crystal, beta-tin whiskers have erupted spontaneously from surfaces of lead-free soldered and tin-plated circuits, causing electrical short circuits and component failures. The proposed work will involve systematic investigations of whisker growth in electronic materials to identify initiating and propagating mechanisms, quantitatively linked to physical stress state, temperature and crystallographic and impurity factors. The work will result in determinations of the effects of each of these factors, and development of a unifying growth model to account for them. The model will be validated against tin and other metals used in electronics that are prone to sprout electrically conductive single crystals. Using this model, TRI will develop a protocol to accelerate representative conditions that excite whisker growth mechanisms. A global solution to whisker growth in electronics will be forthcoming upon availability of this demonstrated growth model. TRI will rely on its metallurgical and materials experience to identify the most robust and least expensive solutions possible. We will develop and qualify an inexpensive tin whisker mitigation technique capable of rapid application using standard manufacturing practices.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Prodrugs. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Cancer, the second leading cause of death in the United States, is diagnosed in more than one million people per year. Radiation and chemotherapy are systemically toxic treatments that indiscriminately kill healthy cells and cancer cells alike. Chemotherapy could be significantly improved by selectively targeting cancer cells. Prodrugs, chemotherapeutic precursors that become active either over time or at a target site, are of interest here. Most prodrugs benefit from either increased temporal control (timed release), or increased spatial control (targeted release). However, very few prodrugs have both temporal and spatial control. TRI/Austin is proposing to develop a prodrug based on a conjugate of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and Floxuridine that can be activated by UV light. The PEG renders the prodrug completely non-toxic. Due to the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect of PEG conjugates in solid tumors, the prodrug will selectively accumulate in cancer tissue. Once activated by UV light, Floxuridine is released and signals apoptosis. The PEG byproduct, as well as any un-activated prodrug, is eventually cleared from the body. This approach minimizes the systemic toxicity of common chemotherapeutics, and can be applied to most existing cancer drugs.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Anodizing of Aluminum Parts for Small Arms. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Individual racking of parts during anodization processes is time consuming and inefficient. The objective of this proposed effort is to develop a process that can anodize large number of small parts, fabricated from aluminum alloys, using a non-racking approach while maintaining high surface quality to meet military standards. Two fixture design concepts, batch process and a non-racking fixture, are proposed. In the batch fixture design, ballasts made of porous metal foam are employed to eliminate surface defects due to contacting aluminum parts. The non-racking fixture utilizes highly porous metal foam as the electrical contact to allow maximum electrolyte diffusion, and minimize contact marks. Fixtures are attached to a vibrating axel for maximum agitation, and pulse anodizing methods are applied to achieve better surface finish quality. TRI/Austin will be teaming with two companies to assist in the development of anodizing fixtures and processes. Analytical tests will be conducted to evaluate the anodic film properties including visual appearance, film thickness, Rockwell hardness, abrasion, and corrosion resistance. The results of this research will be an efficient bulk anodizing process that is capable of high volume yield and outstanding surface finish quality.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Very Rapid Cure Capable Resin and Optimization for Pre-Preg Process Development of Barrier or Isolation Ply Materials. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Current production methods for the composite galvanic isolation ply on the F-35 requires too much time for fabrication and are excessively expensive. TRI/Austin proposes to develop and test unique rapidly curing ultraviolet matrix resins producing innovative high performance, ambient storable, prepreg compositions for the F-35 program and ancillary future applications such as aircraft composite repair. A systematic development and testing program will result in a unique prepreg composition that cures within five minutes and produces a very high glass transition temperature composite. Experimental design techniques to be utilized will systematically evaluate formulation and processing components resulting in a low cost, rapid curing, well adhered, environmentally benign, and chemically resistant isolation ply. The effectiveness of our technical approach will be demonstrated in the course of laboratory based testing including glass transition temperature, cure time, resistance to typical aerospace fluids, weight, density, and thickness. This systematic approach has been proven to be the most effective method for the development of new materials and processes. Throughout the Phase I and II, TRI/Austin will work in cooperation with a prepreg manufacturer and the awardees of topic NAVY 08-137. Immediate benefits of this endeavor for the F-35 program are reduced costs, manhours, and increased production.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Advanced Development for Defense Science and Technology. The abstract given for this project is as follows: To meet DoD combat requirements emerging in the next 10 to 15 years, 'new multifunctional fiber materials and associated composite systems and processing techniques must be developed, and this development must start now.' In making their projections for this technology, DoD expects that 'one must separate incremental gains made using current technology from major leaps arising from new non-PAN precursors and/or completely new fiber technologies.' To address this need, TRI/Austin has recently conceived of a novel material, which it believes is a strong candidate to produce the revolutionary engineering fiber breakthrough needed to replace Kevlar, Twaron, M5 and graphite fibers. We believe that our fiber will have higher modulus, strength, toughness and environmental resistance at a significantly reduced cost compared to these legacy materials. TRI proposes to investigate the chemical and physical properties of our novel material with the aim to determine the engineering parameters necessary to manufacture validation quantities of fiber in Phase II.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Modeling of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Processes for Reliability Assessment. The abstract given for this project is as follows: The time and cost to perform a comprehensive probability of detection (POD) study are significant and burdensome to the process of deploying new inspection methods and techniques. The complexity and cost of this effort require the development of model-assisted methods to determine the POD of new inspection methods and techniques as they are introduced and maintained as part of a cost-effective maintenance process. TRI/Austin has teamed with other key organizations to demonstrate and validate model-assisted POD (MAPOD) as a technology to speed the development and reduce the costs of POD studies. With participation from Iowa State University's Center for NDE, Computational Tools Inc., and NDE Technologies Inc.; the TRI Team will design and execute an experimental program to validate models of ultrasonic inspection (UT) of titanium components, and to then validate the MAPOD approach to POD estimation via comparison to a traditional MIL-HDBK- 1823 study. The TRI Team will commercialize the validated UT software as part of the existing UTSIM commercial product. In addition, the MAPOD process will be documented and supporting software developed and commercialized to facilitate the use of POD methods from traditional MIL-HDBK-1823 analyses to MAPOD methods.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: High-Temperature, Abrasion-Resistant Coating. The abstract given for this project is as follows: The F-35 JSF aircraft imposes a demanding set of reliability requirements, particularly in regard to operation temperature. Millions of dollars are spent every year repairing coatings that cannot withstand high temperatures while maintaining mechanical properties, including those on BMI composite parts for the JSF. The current Teflon-filled coating on the F-35 aft boom covers abrades easily during use at 450oF and short durations at 650'F. TRI/Austin proposes an innovative coating approach to utilize a thermally stable vinyl functional polysilazane binder with an inorganic, high temperature, pigment package that will have superior thermal stability coupled with outstanding abrasion resistance. This coating can be spray or brush applied, and test formulations have already shown excellent results. The technical objectives are to develop optimum coating formulations for polymer coated BMI composites and demonstrate superior thermal protection; confirm that the coating provides excellent adhesion, flexibility, and color as well as resistance to abrasion, chemicals, corrosion, and impact; and investigate test methods to confirm the coating's resistance to abrasion at elevated temperatures. This new high-temperature, abrasion-resistant coating should find many applications in military and commercial aircraft as well as in automotive parts, industrial equipment, and improving commodity materials.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: High Speed Penetration Modeling. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Penetrating warheads filled with High Explosives (HE) can prove ineffective in destroying deeply buried and harden military complexes. The objective of this proposed effort is to develop and empirically validate Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations that can accurately represent materials and assemblies response to high speed impacts and harsh environments. Dynamic FEM on representative test articles containing HE will be generated using LS-DYNA, which will give load paths, stress distribution, strains, and component deformation at various impact velocities. The developed LS-DYNA impact simulations will be compared to penetrator tests on test articles containing simulant HE materials at the University of Texas Institute for Advanced Technology. Design of Experiment (DOE) will be conducted to replicate thermal and vibration events resulting from storage and field-use that can adversely affect mechanical or electrical components' function; small-scaled samples filled with HE or HE simulant will be prepared and aged to access the potential effects of micro cracks or voids on detonation characteristics. Analytical tests will be conducted to evaluate changes in HE after accelerated life testing. The results of this research will be improved performance penetrating warheads that are more reliable, predictable, and deliver maximize lethality to harden complexes.Texas Research Institute Austin is a company that received a Department of Defense SBIR/STTR grant for a project entitled: Materials Development for High Performance Solid Rocket Motor Cases. The abstract given for this project is as follows: Extreme elevated temperatures are reached in solid rocket motors (SRM) applications which have traditionally required the use of both interior and exterior thermal insulation materials. The development of more thermally stable composites would mitigate the need for these insulation layers. TRI/Austin is teaming with a major producer of SRM's to develop a multifunctional material approach to address this problem. Three technical objectives will be pursued simultaneously to address thermal stability issues of the entire composite system, not simply the matrix resin. By addressing the properties of both the matrix resin and the reinforcement interface, significant improvements in overall composite performance at elevated temperatures are anticipated. The next generation rocket systems will rely on technology options that provide inert component size and weight reductions. This motor design approach will enable motors to carry more propellant thereby doubling any potential benefits (less weight/more energy storage) for Future Strategic Strike ICBM designs. The proposed multifunctional material approach can improve the matrix glass transition temperature of the composite case system, while eliminating the need for traditional elastomeric insulation material system.

Texas Research Institute Austin Headquarter Location

9063 Bee Caves Road

Austin, Texas, 78733,

United States

512-263-2101

Latest Texas Research Institute Austin News

TRI NCC 209 Coating Approved For U.S. Naval Submarine Fleet Usage

Jun 10, 2020

Naval Submarine Fleet Usage AUSTIN, Texas, June 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The United States Navy approved Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc. Author: Jun 10, 2020 6:00 AM EDT AUSTIN, Texas, June 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The United States Navy approved Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc.  (TRI Austin) Non-Conductive Coating (NCC) 209 for use on metal outboard cable connector backshells in its submarine fleet, effective April 15, 2020. The approval was granted by the Navy's Submarine Maintenance Engineering, Planning and Procurement Activity (SUBMEPP) in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. TRI's new NCC 209 is a non-metallic cathodic delamination resistant coating for outboard applications on cables and connectors. "It is a proud achievement to now be able to offer the new TRI NCC 209 to the commercial and Navy customer base, after supporting sales and marketing of our successful plasma spray legacy NCC since 1999," said Vince Newton, Business Development and Technology Transition Director of TRI's Applied Technologies (TRI AT), the commercialization and production arm of TRI Austin. Over the past 20 years, TRI Applied Technologies has successfully brought to market a number of technologies developed by TRI Austin to the fleet and warfighter. These include coatings, adhesives, greases, foams, and composite materials. They serve many industries but are primarily focused on aerospace, military vehicles, naval surface ships, submarines, and the oil and gas industry. TRI NCC 209 coating outperforms all other NCC systems with peel strengths well beyond any previously displayed. Independent third-party testing results show a bond that survives the harshest corrosive environments over an extended service life of coated parts. TRI NCC 209 reduces the number of failure points, increases reliability, reduces cost, and eases application methods compared to previous NCC systems. "Usage by the Navy will be a slow, gradual build, but has already begun," said Newton. TRI Applied Technologies has full control of both the chemistry and processing of parts at the new TRI Round Rock facility. This allows TRI to offer the best-performing product on the market while continuing the superior customer service the company has provided over the last two decades. Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc. (TRI Austin) was established in 1975 by Dr. J. Scott Thornton to perform high-quality, rapid-response research and development in advanced materials and materials testing. Proudly based in Austin, Texas, TRI Austin was founded to address reliability and materials needs of the U.S. Navy and advanced materials and technologies for the Department of Defense, NASA, and other government and commercial clients. For more information on TRI AT, visit https://tri-appliedtech.com/ . Media Contact:  Shanti Matulewski smatulewski@tri-intl.com Related Images View original content to download multimedia: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tri-ncc-209-coating-approved-for-us-naval-submarine-fleet-usage-301073247.html SOURCE TRI Applied Technologies

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