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teagasc.ie

About Teagasc

Teagasc provides integrated research, advisory and training services to the agriculture and food industry and rural communities. It is based in Oak Park, Ireland.

Teagasc Headquarter Location

Oak Park

Carlow, R93 XE12,

Ireland

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Teagasc Patents

Teagasc has filed 7 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Alkenoic acids
  • Fatty acids
  • Transcription factors
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

10/15/2004

3/21/2017

Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillales, Bacteriology, Digestive system, Fermented dairy products

Grant

Application Date

10/15/2004

Grant Date

3/21/2017

Title

Related Topics

Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillales, Bacteriology, Digestive system, Fermented dairy products

Status

Grant

Latest Teagasc News

Signpost programme to provide clear emissions ‘picture’ by year end

Aug 9, 2022

The baseline carbon footprint of Teagasc’s 120 Signpost farms is almost complete with a “thorough picture” to emerge by the end of the year, says Dr Tom O’Dwyer. The head of the Signpost Programme — which aims to achieve early progress in reducing gaseous emissions from Irish agriculture, improve water quality and biodiversity, and reduce on-farm costs — says data is currently being analysed on each demonstration farm’s greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions, nutrient use efficiency, soil carbon and biodiversity. It comes as the Government has confirmed that the agricultural sector will require a substantial cut of 25pc in its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, compared to 2018 levels. Speaking to the Farming Independent, Dr O’Dwyer outlined how the programme, launched last year, is progressing as its cross-sector farmers continue to adopt actions from Teagasc’s Marginal Abatement Cost Curve (MACC). “2021 was a hard baseline year, so we’ve gathered data and we’re currently analysing it. We expect, once that analysis is complete, to have a very thorough picture of where the 120 farms are starting from. “We can measure their greenhouse gas emissions, ammonia emissions, nutrient use efficiency, nutrient balances, soil carbon and biodiversity — so we’ll have a good picture of what’s happening on these farms individually and collectively. “We’re obviously repeating the measurements this year, so this time next year we should be able to say what has happened, what has changed and what is the trend. “We will hopefully be able to say emissions are reduced for the following reasons — an increase in the use of protected urea, a reduction in the usage of chemical nitrogen. We hope to be able to explain why changes have occurred.” While Dr O’Dwyer admits that “if all the current MACC measures were implemented, it wouldn’t achieve a 25pc reduction in emissions by the decade”, he urges farmers to “make a start” with proven and available technologies. He expects new interventions, mostly in relation to feed additives and breeding, to come on stream over the next three to four years. “My appeal to farmers is let’s start today by looking at your own farm situation. There are tools in the toolbox that will allow farmers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. “These identified technologies will allow us to make a good start. They won’t get us to 25pc, but let’s have an ambition that in three or four years’ time, we can say ‘emissions from agriculture are reduced by 10/12/14pc’. “That can be achieved by a huge switch to protected urea, a massive uptake in the use of clover, a significant reduction in chemical fertiliser use, and with our animals being slaughtered earlier. “But it’s only going to happen if individual farmers say ‘yes, I’m going to do something about it, I’m going to play my part’. “Certain things recommended in the past are no longer recommended, but there’s also opportunity to save money. “What we want people to do is identify what you can change on your farm, start with ‘the quick win’ that can make an instantaneous difference. “But also start the ones that will take a little bit more time to do deliver — selecting animals that will generate less methane, or will finish earlier in the future, but it’s going to take a few years before you as the farmer or the sector sees a benefit.” On the question of the size of the national herd, he added: “It is important we stabilise the size of the herd, as the challenge of reducing emissions will get an awful lot bigger if there are more breeding animals in the country. “There is also an opportunity to reduce methane emissions by adopting systems which enable the earlier finishing of animals. And Teagasc colleagues are testing a range of methane-reducing feed additives which could potentially be a significant mitigation technology in the future.” Farming Newsletter

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  • Where is Teagasc's headquarters?

    Teagasc's headquarters is located at Oak Park, Carlow.

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