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BeamReach Solar

beamreachsolar.com

Stage

Dead | Dead

Total Raised

$247.49M

About BeamReach Solar

BeamReach Solar, formerly Solexel, breaks through barriers in the solar market, moving closer to a world where clean energy is everywhere. Born from proven technology, inspired by design, and driven by performance, Beamreach Solar's solar technology enables the commercialization of rooftop solar products. With solar systems that are light, efficient and easy to install, Beamreach Solar delivers more value to solar installers, developers, roofers and commercial solar customers than conventional photovoltaic (PV) solar systems.

Headquarters Location

1530 McCarthy Blvd

Milpitas, California, 95035,

United States

408-240-3800

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Expert Collections containing BeamReach Solar

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

BeamReach Solar is included in 1 Expert Collection, including Renewable Energy.

R

Renewable Energy

3,995 items

Includes companies working on technology to support renewable energy generation.

BeamReach Solar Patents

BeamReach Solar has filed 1 patent.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Energy conversion
  • Photovoltaics
  • Solar cells
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

8/8/2016

7/31/2018

Photovoltaics, Photovoltaics manufacturers, Solar cells, Solar energy, Applications of photovoltaics

Grant

Application Date

8/8/2016

Grant Date

7/31/2018

Title

Related Topics

Photovoltaics, Photovoltaics manufacturers, Solar cells, Solar energy, Applications of photovoltaics

Status

Grant

Latest BeamReach Solar News

Beamreach Bankrupt Despite $250 Million Spent on Solar Hardware Development

Aug 2, 2022

Debt has come due and the former Solexel’s pivot to commercial roofs came too late. Eric Wesoff January 30, 2017 Greentech Media Eric Wesoff is Editor-at-Large at Greentech Media. Prior to joining GTM, Eric Wesoff founded Sage Marketing Partners in 2000 to provide sales and marketing-consulting services to venture-capital firms and their portfolio companies in the alternative energy and telecommunications sectors. Mr. Wesoff has become a well-known, respected authority and speaker in these fields. His expertise covers solar power, fuel cells, biofuels and advanced batteries. His strengths are in market research and analysis, business development and due diligence for investors. He frequently consults for energy startups and Silicon Valley's premier venture capitalists. Beamreach Bankrupt Despite $250 Million Spent on Solar Hardware Development Photo Credit: Gonzo Carles Creative Commons After spending more than $250 million, Solexel (rechristened as Beamreach last year) has joined its brethren on the list of failed solar startups . This follows a late-in-corporate-life shift to low-weight modules and away from its original thin-silicon aspirations. In 2008, no solar entrepreneur or investor envisioned photovoltaic module costs of 30 cents per watt -- which is where we are today. A startup founded in 2008, like Solexel, based its business plan on module costs of about $4 per watt and falling. The firm received $3 million in DOE funding in 2008 for a project with this description: "Solexel plans on commercializing a disruptive, 3-D, high-efficiency mono-crystalline silicon cell technology, while dramatically reducing manufacturing cost per watt. Solexel plans to deliver a 17%-19% efficient, 156 x 156 mm2, single-crystal cell that consumes substantially lower silicon per watt than conventionally sliced wafers. Solexel aspires to be a GW scale PV producer within five years." That last thing didn't happen. The first time the company unstealthed in 2012, it was focusing on its thin-silicon technology and looking to mass-produce 35-micron-thick high-performance, low-cost monocrystalline solar cells using a lift-off technology based on a reusable template and a porous silicon substrate. The startup hit an NREL-certified cell efficiency of 21.2 percent in 2014 with its back contact cell. Solexel aimed to ship 20-percent-efficient photovoltaic modules at a cost of $0.42 per watt by 2014. That didn't happen. Last year, the rebranded Beamreach pivoted to go after the commercial and industrial rooftop market with a lightweight, easy-to-install module with the use of thinner front sheet glass, a composite material for the frame, an integrated mounting structure and an adhesion method for low-slope commercial rooftop surfaces. That product received a positive market reception. But debt has come due and the company's venture investors are walking away. Beamreach raised its quarter billion from investors including Riyadh Valley Company, the VC investment arm of King Saud University of Saudi Arabia, and GAF (a large roofing materials manufacturer), along with SunPower, KPCB, Technology Partners, The Westly Group, DAG Ventures, Gentry Ventures, Northgate Capital, GSV Capital, Jasper Ridge Partners, and Spirox. The firm's board of directors includes Jan van Dokkum of KPCB and, until recently , Ira Ehrenpreis. Somewhere along the line, the board saw fit to spend millions building a manufacturing facility in Milpitas, Calif. The firm has few employees remaining after a series of recent and not-so-recent layoffs. Vendors are not getting paid. According to sources close to the firm, this is bankruptcy and liquidation -- not a Chapter 11 reorganization. Beamreach picked up $25 million in senior debt financing from Opus Bank in 2015. Commercial market potential, but too late in the game When Beamreach was a thin-silicon or high-efficiency player, it might have been competing against SunPower, SolarCity, Panasonic, Samsung, Suniva or 1366 Technologies. After its shift, Beamreach looked a bit like tenKsolar, which offers high-efficiency photovoltaic systems for commercial rooftops and ground-mount projects, or even a bit like SunPower with its integrated solution. Certainly, the commercial market is ready to grow. In the recently published report U.S. Commercial Solar Landscape 2016-2020 , GTM Research forecasts the U.S. commercial solar market to "rebound and nearly triple in size by 2020." But, nine years of legacy misspending have left Beamreach with "loans due" and "a catastrophic cash flow situation," despite what sources suggest is substantial demand and "sales traction" for the new commercial product. It's a smart market niche to chase -- but it's too late for Beamreach.

BeamReach Solar Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • Where is BeamReach Solar's headquarters?

    BeamReach Solar's headquarters is located at 1530 McCarthy Blvd, Milpitas.

  • What is BeamReach Solar's latest funding round?

    BeamReach Solar's latest funding round is Dead.

  • How much did BeamReach Solar raise?

    BeamReach Solar raised a total of $247.49M.

  • Who are the investors of BeamReach Solar?

    Investors of BeamReach Solar include Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, DAG Ventures, Technology Partners, Riyadh Valley Company, Opus Bank and 14 more.

  • Who are BeamReach Solar's competitors?

    Competitors of BeamReach Solar include Ampulse, Accustrata, Solaicx, M V Systems, Anteos and 13 more.

Compare BeamReach Solar to Competitors

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Silicon Photonics Group

Silicon Photonics Group is a company that received a STTR Phase I grant for a project entitled: Advanced Si-Ge-Sn-based Photonic Materials and Devices. Their research project aims to demonstrate prototype infrared light detectors and photovoltaic (solar cell) devices based on technology developed at Arizona State University. The new technology to be explored consists in growing optical-quality alloys of tin and germanium (Ge1-ySny) directly on silicon wafers. These alloys act as infrared materials, and they can also be used as templates for the subsequent growth of other semiconductors on silicon. Of particular interest for this project is the ternary alloy Ge1-x-ySixSny, grown for the first time at Arizona State University. Using this technology, it should be possible to build infrared detectors covering a spectral range previously inaccessible to silicon-based detectors, and to build multijunction photovoltaic devices for a more efficient capture of solar photons. The fabrication of semiconductor devices on cheap silicon wafers is of great significance because of the potentially enormous cost reductions and the possibility of integrating optoelectronic and microelectronic functions, which further reduces costs and contributes to system miniaturization. The infrared detectors proposed here cover the so-called telecom C-,L-, and U-bands within the wavelength window around 1500 nm, a region of great interest to the telecommunications industry. In the photovoltaics arena, the proposed devices have the potential to offer increased efficiencies to make crystalline silicon-based devices competitive with amorphous silicon solutions.

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Jem Enterprises

Jem Enterprises is a company that received a SBIR Phase I grant for a project entitled: Tin(II) Sulfide Photovoltaics. Their project aims to develop photovoltaic devices based on tin (II) sulfide (SnS). The properties of SnS, including bandgaps, carrier density and mobility, chemical and thermal stability, and metallurgical properties, promise the possibility to achieve relatively high conversion efficiency given state-of-art process control and device design. In this project, close space sublimation (CSS) technique, a thin film fabrication method proven for low cost and high manufacturability, will be used to synthesize SnS. The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to produce photovoltaic devices based on low-cost and environmentally-friendly materials. There is no doubt that solar electricity has attracted a lot of attention in recent years as an alternative and renewable energy source. However, most of the current solar cell technologies have one or more of the following issues that, (1) raw materials are not abundantly available; (2) toxic materials are used; (3) overall cost is high. This project will address these issues by developing photovoltaic devices using SnS, a semiconductor material that can be supplied on a massive scale and at low recovery costs.

P
PrimeStar Solar

Primestar Solar is a company that received a SBIR Phase I grant for a project entitled: High Quality, Low Cost, Polycrystalline CdS/CdTe Photovoltaic Cells. Their will develop new processes for producing lower cost and higher quality thin films from the compound semiconductors CdS and CdTe. These will be used to more inexpensively produce high performance photovoltaic modules that generate electricity from sunlight. Thin film CdTe-based photovoltaics currently require a post-deposition CdCl2 treatment and anneal to achieve reasonable performance. This anneal is known to increase the grain size in some films and increase the minority carrier lifetime in all CdTe films. The minority carrier lifetime is generally correlated with device efficiency in photovoltaic cells. However, the CdCl2 anneal cannot be optimized to maximize the minority carrier lifetime because attempts to do so have caused film delamination. Film delamination occurs due to strain induced during the anneal at the interface between the film and the glass substrate. This proposal seeks to develop a film deposition process that simultaneously avoids this problem and makes better quality films. This process will foster large grain growth, defect passivation, and grain boundary passivation while eliminating the need for a post-deposition CdCl2 treatment and anneal. This will result in higher efficiency solar cells and a streamlined production process. Commercially, solar photovoltaic modules are a silent, pollution free means to generate electricity from sunlight. Once the capital investment is made to install a photovoltaic electricity system, its operating cost is essentially zero because its "fuel", sunlight, is free. Photovoltaic electricity provides a means for homes to generate as much energy as they use over the course of a year. The production of photovoltaic modules has been increasing 20-30% annually for the past decade due to increases in efficiency and reductions in cost. However, for photovoltaics to achieve significant market penetration into mainstream electricity generation, this growth rate must be continued. This requires further increases in module efficiency and reductions in module cost. This research proposal addresses both of these issues. Successful development of this technology will ensure the marketplace success of CdTe photovoltaic modules, and pave the way for widespread stable-priced, sustainable, pollution-free electricity generation.

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Gratings Incorporated

Gratings Incorporated is a company that received a STTR Phase I grant for a project entitled: High Efficiency Thin-film Photovoltaics on Low-cost Substrates by Layer Transfer. Their their award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and their project will apply high aspect ratio, nm-scale, columnar, and crystalline Si structures as templates for high-quality growth of thin-film GaAs solar cells on low-cost flexible substrates. Sub-10-nm Si seed layers are expected to facilitate growth of low-defect density GaAs films. The aspect ratio of nm-scale structures also serve as sacrificial layers for removal of completed GaAs solar cell. Epitaxial growth and characterization of GaAs films on nm-scale Si structures will be carried out at the Center for High Technology at the University of New Mexico. Successful phase I STTR research will lead to commercialization of high (~ 20 %) efficient, flexible solar cells for applications in a wide range of terrestrial and space environments. Multiple substrate re-use and inherent large area processing capability of Si will result in significant cost reductions. High quality heteroepitaxial GaAs growth on Si has been a subject of intense research. Due to its direct bandgap, GaAs is attractive for a number of optoelectronics applications and its integration with Si-based microelectronics has been a cherished goal. The lattice and thermal expansion mismatches with Si make it difficult to grow good device quality layers. We have recently demonstrated as the Si seed dimension is reduced below 100 nm dimensions, the quality of heteroepitaxial growth increases rapidly. The nm-scale Si structures are formed using low-cost, large area methods based on conventional integrated circuit processing methods. Successful research effort will lead to reduction in PV generation costs, and enhanced applicability of thin-film PV in terrestrial and space environments because in contrast with competing thin-film solar cells, GaAs thin-film solar cells will not suffer from light-induced performance degradation.

E
Enexra

developed a technology that aims to allow for more efficient use of crystalline silicon in solar cells - a that could allow solar cells to generate electricity at costs competitive with conventional energy sources.

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