Search company, investor...
Search
Sepsis Alliance company logo

The profile is currenly unclaimed by the seller. All information is provided by CB Insights.

sepsis.org

About Sepsis Alliance

Sepsis Alliance is the sepsis charitable organization that works to save lives and reduce suffering from sepsis. It is based in San Diego, California.

Sepsis Alliance Headquarters Location

3180 University Avenue Suite 235

San Diego, California, 92104,

United States

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

Sepsis Alliance Patents

Sepsis Alliance has filed 2 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Blood tests
  • Causes of death
  • Inflammations
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

12/20/2013

3/6/2018

Intensive care medicine, Syndromes, Inflammations, Blood tests, Human female endocrine system

Grant

Application Date

12/20/2013

Grant Date

3/6/2018

Title

Related Topics

Intensive care medicine, Syndromes, Inflammations, Blood tests, Human female endocrine system

Status

Grant

Latest Sepsis Alliance News

An Ottawa sepsis survivor who lost three limbs pays it forward by helping others

Oct 1, 2022

Sign Up By clicking on the sign up button you consent to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You may unsubscribe any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc. | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300 Thanks for signing up! A welcome email is on its way. If you don't see it, please check your junk folder. The next issue of Ottawa Citizen Headline News will soon be in your inbox. We encountered an issue signing you up. Please try again Article content Sepsis can be a life changing medical event and many survivors deal with post-traumatic stress, chronic pain, fatigue and reduced organ function. “There are many people suffering with brain fog and pain from vascular damage after surviving sepsis,” said Caron, 58, a mother of four and a new grandmother. “It’s strange to say, but I’m one of the lucky ones: I don’t have the same joint and vascular pain that a lot of these people have.” Sepsis is a life-threatening condition resulting from the body’s runaway response to a serious infection. It can be triggered by a bacterial, fungal or viral infection, including COVID-19, and, if not identified and treated promptly, can led to septic shock, organ failure and death. Advertisement 3 Article content Caron’s life-and-death struggle with sepsis began in May 2013 after one of her four dogs, Buster, a three-year-old Shih Tzu, accidentally bit her left hand during a game of tug-of-war. The bacteria commonly found in dog and cat saliva, Capnocytophaga , can infect people. In rare cases, it can lead to serious illness, including sepsis. “It wasn’t a deep bite, just a break of the skin,” Caron remembered. “There was no redness around it, no pain.” She washed and disinfected the wound, but some of her other dogs also licked her hand. Christine Caron went through rehabilitation to learn to walk and live with prosthetic limbs, but it was another five years before she fully recovered from post-sepsis brain fog and speech problems. Photo by Tony Caldwell /Postmedia It was a Saturday. She was a single-parent of four children who worked full-time while also looking after four dogs. “I was used to going 100 miles an hour all the time,” she said. “My feet hit the ground in the morning and I just started going.” Advertisement 4 Article content Two days after the bite, she noticed she hadn’t gone to the bathroom all day and thought it strange. She would later recognize it as a sign that her kidneys were shutting down. On Tuesday, during her daily half-hour run, she didn’t make it more than a block. She went to work, but felt so ill that she returned home and slept. Later that evening, she asked a friend to take her to an after-hours clinic in Orléans, but they arrived to find the clinic closed, so Caron decided to go to hospital in the morning. She spent most of the night in the bathroom with nausea. She thought she had a terrible flu or pneumonia. “I should have called an ambulance, but my brain wasn’t working properly,” she said. Caron made it to the Montfort Hospital the next morning and passed out in the waiting room. Advertisement 5 Article content She woke from a coma more than one month later only to be told she needed to have three limbs amputated because the blood-clotting associated with sepsis had stemmed the blood flow to her extremities and destroyed much of their tissue. It was only then, she said, that she learned for the first time about sepsis. She went through rehabilitation to learn to walk and live with prosthetic limbs, but it was another five years before she fully recovered from post-sepsis brain fog and speech problems. “That’s one of the other reasons I started these support groups: because you go from having all of this support to being left on your own,” she said. “There’s no support for survivors.” Caron wants more research into post-sepsis syndrome and more help for those who suffer from it. She also wants more information made available to people so they can recognize when sepsis has taken hold. Advertisement 6 Article content “If you recognize those signs and bring them to the attention of a doctor in the emergency room, you can walk out of the ER, rather than be wheeled out,” said Caron, who told her story this past week to mark sepsis awareness month. One reason sepsis kills so many people — more than 9,000 each year in Canada — is that it’s often hard to recognize as a medical emergency. Most sepsis cases start at home, and a campaign has been launched by the Sepsis Alliance, a U.S.-based charity, to help people recognize its symptoms . Warning signs include chills or fever, a high heart rate and shortness of breath. People with sepsis can also have extreme pain or discomfort, clammy or sweaty skin and can exhibit signs of confusion or disorientation. The Sepsis Alliance recommends: “Watch for a combination of these symptoms. If you suspect sepsis, call 911 or go to a hospital with an advocate and ask, ‘Could it be sepsis?’”

Sepsis Alliance Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
CBI Logo

Sepsis Alliance Rank

  • Where is Sepsis Alliance's headquarters?

    Sepsis Alliance's headquarters is located at 3180 University Avenue, San Diego.

Discover the right solution for your team

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on vendors, products, partnerships, and patents to help your team find their next technology solution.

Request a demo

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.