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sensio.no

Founded Year

2009

Stage

Acq - Fin | Alive

Revenue

$0000 

About Sensio

Sensio provides welfare technology solutions to public institutions, personal safety alarms and home automation to the residential market.

Sensio Headquarter Location

Brugata 19

Oslo, 0186,

Norway

+47 23 21 00 00

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Sensio Patents

Sensio has filed 17 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Cabinets (furniture)
  • Classes of computers
  • Furniture
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

12/9/2019

12/1/2020

Lighting, Light sources, Cabinets (furniture), Woodworking, Furniture

Grant

Application Date

12/9/2019

Grant Date

12/1/2020

Title

Related Topics

Lighting, Light sources, Cabinets (furniture), Woodworking, Furniture

Status

Grant

Latest Sensio News

3D-printed MyCello combines the best of acoustic and digital design

Jun 3, 2021

We’ve seen 3D printing used to create a good many musical instruments over the years, including guitars , saxophones , violins and more. The latest to join the orchestra comes from education software company Sensio in the striking form of the MyCello. “Playing the cello is my passion,” said MyCello design team member, Ondrej Kratochvil. “I have always wanted to be able to play at home for long hours without disturbing the neighbors or my family. I wanted an instrument that would allow me to do that, and at the same time be lightweight, easily portable, and with a good sound. I discovered that there was no such instrument available on the market, so I decided to design one.” Currently raising production funds on Kickstarter, the MyCello has not been created as a replacement for traditional wooden cellos, but is developed to combine the best aspects of a classic instrument with modern electric models. Its skeletal body has been designed to allow the player freedom of movement while bowing, and the makers say that those who have mastered a classical cello will feel right at home using the My Cello as it boasts the same neck shape, string setup and construction attributes. There’s a chest rest about half way up the neck, the long endpin slides and locks from behind to achieve a comfortable playing height – and is adjustable even while sitting – and the tuners are down below, between the knee rests. The MyCello can be played acoustically, output to an amp/speaker or through headphones Sensio It can be played unplugged, like a lower-volume version of a traditional wooden instrument, or a bridge pickup can output to an amp/speaker system, with built-in EQ control on the instrument itself. Headphones can even be plugged straight into the MyCello. The 3D-printing and assembly processes are reckoned to take about 100 hours for each instrument, though running printers in parallel should allow the team to produce several MyCellos at the same time. A modular design approach allows for instrument flexibility – size, color, number of strings, overall size and other personal preferences can be accommodated – while offering players the opportunity to modify, repair or improve on the standard MyCello. For added convenience, there’s an integrated blow holder, and the instrument can even be had with a smartphone mount for displaying digital sheet music while playing. And where a wooden cello can be a bit cumbersome to transport, the 2.2-kg (5-lb) MyCello can be folded down and carried around in a companion backpack, or it can be broken down into components for reassembly at rehearsal or performance. A lightweight design, custom options and the ability to play in quiet, normal or amplified modes are certainly attractive selling points, but cellists will need to hear what it sounds like, which is where the pitch video below comes in. Kickstarter pledges start at US$899, though if you want a bow and backpack included then you’ll need to stump up at least $1,184. If all goes to plan, shipping is estimated to start in November. MyCello – the only 3D-printed electric cello in the world Back in April, Canon dropped a few choice details about its upcoming pro-focused mirrorless flagship, the EOS R3 . Now the company’s drip feed continues with some more key specs, including improved tracking autofocus and internal recording of RAW video. Canon hasn’t offered much in the way of new information on the new full-frame back-illuminated stacked-CMOS image sensor but we do now know that it will work with the company’s Digic X processor to capture RAW format files at up to 30 frames per second, with full AF/AE tracking. The EOS R3 will feature a brand new full-frame, back-illuminated stacked CMOS sensor, though the megapixel count is an unknown at present Canon The company already revealed that the camera’s AI-driven autofocus system will offer improved face, eye, head and animal body (including birds) detection, but now reports that it will also be able to register and track cars and motorcycles, which could be useful for motorsports photojournalists. And that AF system will be able to focus in low-light conditions, right down to -7 EV or lower. Video chops include being able to make use of the same object recognition technology as for stills shooting, and support for Canon Log3 for “greater dynamic range and color grading possibilities.” Users can also record oversampled 4K or RAW video to the CFexpress card popped in the slot (the camera has two media slots, one for CFexpress and the other for SD), but Canon is yet to reveal video frame rates and the full spread of supported resolutions. Up to eight stops of image stabilization can be had when the camera is paired with compatible OIS lenses, the camera’s hot shoe provides power and data functionality for new accessories, and the R3 will be able to sync with Speedlite flashes while the electronic shutter is active, meaning that “the distortion of fast-moving subjects is virtually eliminated.” The EOS R3 will work with Canon’s Mobile File Transfer app, which allows users to add metadata to image files Canon Elsewhere, the R3 rocks a vari-angle touchscreen LCD display panel, there’s built-in wired LAN and 5-GHz Wi-Fi for high-speed data transfer flexibility, and the new model is also reported compatible with Canon’s Mobile File Transfer app, which allows for the addition of metadata to images, add voice memos and send images from a smartphone when a Wi-Fi connection is not available. There’s a fair bit of EOS 1D series DNA here too, including the same LP-E19 battery as the EOS-1D X III , a magnesium-alloy dual-grip body that’s been sealed against dust and water ingress to the same standards as the 1D series DSLRs, and a familiar control layout – with both multi and smart controllers placed within reach of a user’s thumb. And that’s about it for now. Hopefully the next product update will complete the picture, and give us expected pricing and availability. Squished between France and Spain in the Pyrenees mountains lies the 16th-smallest country in the world, a gorgeous land-locked microstate covering a third the area of London, called the Principality of Andorra. It’s known for its veal and its valleys, for tourism and tax haven status, and for its near-total lack of crime. It’s also the home of a relatively new high-end ebike company called Forestal, figureheaded by French mountain biking legend Cedric Garcia. After debuting with its Syrion enduro ebike last year, Forestal has released a range of four more bikes for 2021 – a trail bike, a downhill beast, and folding and non-folding versions of a city commuter. All are built with lightweight carbon frames, custom designed around Forestal’s own mid-drive electric powertrain. Yes, these are Euro bikes, so they’re hobbled to 250-W. But Forestal has designed its EonDrive motor (in conjunction with Bafang) to offer high performance in its own way, keeping it under 2 kg (4.4 lb) using a magnesium casing and titanium components, and very narrow at 170 mm (6.7 in) while putting out a healthy 60 Nm (44.2 lb.ft) of torque at its highest setting. The company claims this qualifies the EonDrive as “the lightest and most compact high-performance motor today.” Forestal’s EonDrive motor, developed in conjunction with Bafang, is a super-compact, sub-2 kilo 250-watter putting out an impressive-for-its-size 60 Nm of torque Forestal Unlike some ebike motors, Forestal says this motor completely disengages once you switch it off or reach the EU-mandated top speed governor at 25 km/h (15.5 mph), creating no further noise or friction drag to make your life harder. That’ll make the relatively small battery easier to take; the company has designed its own 360-Wh, 52-V battery (again in conjunction with Bafang) that weighs slightly less than the motor and integrates nicely into the frames. It’s not a lot of battery, and it won’t offer a ton of range – but if you want more, there’s an extra accessory battery you can stick in the bottle cage for another 250 Wh. Forestal is erring on the side of lightweighting here, trying to make ebikes that feel fun and flickable. So it’s not loading you up with cells you might not use – indeed, the batteries aren’t even removable. The new bikes also use the same intelligent dash as the Syrion – a next-level, full color, scratch-resistant, all-weather touchscreen system that handles all the usual ebike functions and adds GPS navigation, geolocation and anti-theft features, the ability to record and datalog your rides, an elevation tracker, g-force sensors, heart rate integration, training modes and statistics. It lacks the built-in dashcams found on something like the Greyp 6.1 , but it’s still bristling with smart technology and it looks much better integrated. Oh, and it’ll measure and record your air time when you jump the thing. Mondo. The dash is a high-res, all-weather touchscreen beauty Forestal So let’s take a quick look at the new bikes. The Cyon is the trail bruiser of the range, built to take a beating like the Syrion but to be quicker, more agile and responsive in the smoother stuff. It runs a similar “alpha box” frame to the original Siryon, complete with its “twin levity” single pivot swingarm. The wheels are 29-inchers, and the suspension, brakes, drivetrain and wheels depend on which model you go for, from the €8,299 (about US$10,100) Halo up to the gorgeous, Ohlins-equipped Diode model at €12,599 ($15,370). Forestal’s lightweighting regime has kept the Cyon down to just 17 kg (37.5 lb), which is quite a feat. The Hydra will be close to Cedric Garcia’s heart; it’s a downhill-focused beast for riders that don’t find the enduro or trail bikes hardcore enough. It’s specced out for serious downhill riders riding world cup series-level tracks, but with the bonus ability to cruise back up again without troubling your heart rate. Again it’s an alpha box frame with twin levity suspension linkage, although this time it uses a coil shock and a full-length asymmetrical fork with 170 and 180 mm of travel respectively, so you can land big jumps with confidence. Again there are different spec levels, with the Halo costing €9,999 ($12,200) and the top-spec Diode coming in at €12,099 ($14,750). The heavier suspension contributes to a slightly higher weight starting at 19.2 kg (42.3 lb), which is still very low for an electric mountain bike. The Hydra is a flat-out downhill track blaster with full-length forks and a coil shock Forestal The Aryon and Aryon SC are a complete departure from the rest of the range. These are urban-focused machines with 20-inch street wheels, carbon belt drives, wireless dropper seat posts, integrated front and rear lighting, tasty built-in fenders and compact commuter frames. The SC is the base model here, coming in at €8,599 ($10,500) with a rigid frame and carbon fork. Annoyingly, no weight figure is specified. The regular Aryon, on the other hand, is a flagship of sorts for Forestal, adding full, shortish-travel suspension as well as a folding design that tucks away the swingarm, seat post and handlebars very neatly for storage if you’re not blessed with a shed to stick it in. The company calls it a crossover, a “mini mountain bike in disguise” that’s genuinely capable of off-road shenanigans as well as trundling around town. Then again, it also calls the Aryon “a design and engineering masterpiece” in which “every detail looks like a piece of art … that could belong to the most exclusive art galleries,” so it’s clear Forestal isn’t the kind of company to go underselling itself. The Aryon sells for €10,399 ($12,700). The Aryon is a folding city commuter – but with dual suspension and some off-road trail chops Forestal These are indeed eye-bleeding prices for bicycles, right up with the cream of two-wheeled European buttock jewelry. There are many motorcycles, and probably the odd car too, that you could buy for less – not to mention a plethora of unrestricted ebikes that would go much farther and faster. But these are premium machines, lightweight and beautiful and festooned with high-spec componentry and smart technology. They look like they’re built to handle serious riding and to take a decent beating, and for the right rider they could well be worth the money. Check out a short video on the Cyon trail bike below. [embedded content] A new Ikea store planned for Copenhagen will feature a public rooftop park and pathways along with the usual selection of flatpack furniture. Designed by Dorte Mandrup , it will also boast significant energy efficient design, including a solar panel array. Ikea Copenhagen will be located in the Vesterbri district of Copenhagen (the city of Copenhagen also has an ambitious plan to become carbon neutral by 2025) and will involve landscape architect 1:1 Landskab and Søren Jensen Consulting Engineers. The project is part of Ikea’s larger sustainable business effort, of which the Ikea Vienna Westbahnhof is also an example. Though Ikea’s trademark blue and yellow colors do of course make an obligatory appearance, the building will be a departure from the typical warehouse design the company is known for. Instead, it will be defined by a flowing exterior that’s inspired by a white curtain with folds and ripples. It will be covered in greenery – over 250 trees and bushes will be planted – and will create a new rooftop park-like area, situated 20 m (65 ft) above the city streets. “Different native woods, shrubs, grasses, and bug hotels matching the conditions of wind, sun and shade creates a rich fauna while at the same time delaying rainwater,” explains Dorte Mandrup. “Not only adding a lush new park, the 150-meter [492-ft] roof garden will also be part of a new walking route stretching 1 km [0.6 miles] from the southern part of Copenhagen all the way to the inner city. The new front plaza adds a green space to busy Dybølsbro bridge, running over the train tracks – an entirely new public area with café and bike parking surrounded by urban nature with public access down to a new bus terminal and up onto the park above.” Ikea Copenhagen will feature public areas including a rooftop park and pathways, and is described as a green lounge by designer Dorte Mandrup Dorte Mandrup The project is slated to receive the BREEAM Outstanding green building certification. A rooftop solar panel array measuring 1,450 sq m (roughly 15,600 sq ft) will reduce its draw on the grid, while nearby canals will be used as a heatsink coupled to an energy efficient cooling system. Additionally, there will be bicycle parking and cargo bikes available to customers who want to haul their new furniture home. Ikea Copenhagen is due to be completed sometime in 2023. The old saying “like water off a duck’s back” is well-earned – the water-loving birds have specialized feathers that keep them from getting too wet. Now, engineers at Virginia Tech have investigated the physics behind how they work and developed synthetic feathers that could help ships glide through the water more easily. Duck feathers get their water-repelling abilities from a few features working in tandem. For one, ducks will regularly spread oil from a special gland over their outer feathers, which makes water form droplets and roll right off. But the microscale structure of the feathers also plays a key role, trapping air that keeps water away from the bird’s skin. The Virginia Tech researchers first investigated what happens when multiple layers of these feathers are stacked up. They partly sealed a series of feathers and piled them on top of each other so that the unsealed sections lined up. This was placed in a pressure chamber, then water was poured onto the top feather, and air was piped in to force the water down through the feathers. The team compared real and synthetic duck feathers in the lab, and found that both performed well at repelling water Virginia Tech The team found that, understandably, the more feather layers there are, the more pressure is required to get the water through them all. And sure enough, it seems that different duck species will tend to have just the right amount of feather layers to keep them dry based on how deep they usually dive. “Our hypothesis was to use multiple layers of feathers so that the water only comes in part way, but there are air pockets under that,” says Jonathan Boreyko, corresponding author of the study. “As long as those air pockets are present, it prevents something called irreversible wetting. As long as the wetting is only partial, they can shake it out when they surface.” Based on what they’d learned from nature, the researchers then set about designing their own synthetic water-resistant feathers. They started with a thin sheet of aluminum foil, then laser cut series of slots just one tenth of a millimeter wide into it, then they etched a nanostructure into it that resembled tiny hairs. The result is a high surface area that traps air pockets more easily. Researcher Jonathan Boreyko holds up a section of synthetic feather material Virginia Tech When they ran the tests again, the researchers found that their synthetic versions worked just as well as their natural inspiration. The team says this technique could eventually find use in making synthetic feathers for ships, to help reduce drag and stop barnacles from clinging on. “If we think of a ship moving over the water as an engineered bird, right now it’s swimming naked,” says Boreyko. “We wonder if clothing the ship in feathers could impart the same enhancements that waterfowl benefit from.”

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Sensio Rank

  • When was Sensio founded?

    Sensio was founded in 2009.

  • Where is Sensio's headquarters?

    Sensio's headquarters is located at Brugata 19, Oslo.

  • What is Sensio's latest funding round?

    Sensio's latest funding round is Acq - Fin.

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