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srft.nhs.uk

Founded Year

1882

About Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust

Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust is an organization in the NHS, providing care to patients.

Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust Headquarter Location

Stott Lane

Salford, England, M6 8HD,

United Kingdom

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Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust Patents

Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust has filed 1 patent.

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Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

9/23/2016

8/6/2019

Database management systems, Data laws, Information privacy, Data management, SQL

Grant

Application Date

9/23/2016

Grant Date

8/6/2019

Title

Related Topics

Database management systems, Data laws, Information privacy, Data management, SQL

Status

Grant

Latest Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust News

"I can’t afford to be worried about Covid restrictions": Clinically vulnerable, facing skyrocketing living costs, and falling through the cracks

Mar 7, 2022

"I can’t afford to be worried about Covid restrictions": Clinically vulnerable, facing skyrocketing living costs, and falling through the cracks As clinically vulnerable people launch opposition to the government's rollback of restrictions, one man shares how he "can’t afford to go anywhere I might catch the virus" 07:21, 7 MAR 2022 Sign up for our daily newsletter to get the day's biggest stories sent direct to your inbox Something went wrong, please try again later.Invalid Email Subscribe We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info Thank you for subscribing!We have more newsletters Show me See our privacy notice “Having to use a food bank would be my worst nightmare,” laughs John, exasperated. Since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, he’s been marked as among the clinically vulnerable - suffering chronic spinal arthritis, vertebrae collapse, and multiple joint inflammation. But two years in, as many people like John voice their opposition to the rollback of the remaining Covid restrictions, his mind is consumed by another set of fears. In the face of mounting living costs, and an apparent absence of any help, he says he can’t even afford to go anywhere he might catch the virus. 'Things are going to get worse before they get better' John first became disabled in 2011, he tells the Manchester Evening News , but managed to keep on working in health care until 2016. His arthritis became increasingly severe, to the point where he cannot walk well without a crutch or walking stick. By that point, he had completed 40 years’ service, and claiming benefits was completely alien to him. John doesn't know where to turn - and going to a food bank is his 'worst nightmare' (Image: ABNM Photography) John, from Salford , ‘had trouble sorting his disability benefit’, and resorting to using his pension to get by. Now, he’s reliant on the standard state pension and his legacy benefits. Amid an incoming spike in the cost of living - with rising council tax, energy bills and supermarket shelf prices - John is ‘apprehensive’ for the future. Read More “I’m sure there are many people who are in a worse position than myself, but it doesn’t detract from the fact that things are going to get worse,” John said. “I’m fortunate enough to have a good utilities provider, but energy will still be going up by 54 per cent. “I’m on a disability benefit that’s a legacy benefit, not Universal Credit, but that doesn’t seem to be going up at all in line with everything else.” Salfordian John struggles to make ends meet (Image: Manchester Evening News) Two years of loss and living on the breadline John is one of thousands across the country who have hunkered down during the pandemic, at higher risk of death from Covid-19 given their clinically vulnerable status. Others of his cohort are railing against the government’s decision to end restrictions, including the controversial choice to end free mass testing, saying that vulnerable people will have ‘no safe space’ and will be forced to isolate from society even more than they already have. Yet, it’s financial uncertainty that’s isolating John. John has struggled to get out and about due to his mobility being hampered by spinal arthritis (Image: ABNM Photography) “As far as Covid restrictions go, I don’t go anywhere to meet up with anyone I might catch the virus from,” he explains. “I go shopping for the essentials each week, but I can’t afford to go anywhere I might catch the virus. “Even if I could drive, I couldn’t afford a car. “I get just enough to cope, I’m not exactly short of anything but not liquid enough to do anything.” Just after becoming too ill to work, the 64-year-old lost his mum, followed by a pandemic that brought yet more tragedy to his door. He’s become used to being alone, keeping stuffed animals that his mother found comforting during her battle with vascular dementia in memory of her. “I’m on my own. If I take ill, there’s no one to call an ambulance or take me to the hospital. John's stuffed animals have become his 'family' - important reminders of his mum who he lost in 2016 (Image: UGC) “I’ve lost a few friends over the last couple of years. My next door neighbour moved away, so I’ve got an empty house next door to me now. A friend who I used to work with had a serious stroke and was paralysed down one side. Fortunately, he has a wife and daughter to look after him. “I don’t feel lonely as such, I’m quite used to it. I just suppose it would be nice having someone to talk to.” John lost friends to Covid-19, while neighbours moved away, making him increasingly isolated (Image: ABNM Photography) Disabled people left worse off by missing benefits, say lawyers John’s story comes as two million Brits who claim old-style benefits, like he does, were found to be left worse off by the government's decision not to extend extra payments during the pandemic. Families were left reeling last month when the High Court ruled the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) didn’t break the law when it excluded those on legacy benefits from a £20 weekly payment during the Covid pandemic. Legacy benefits in the process of changing (Image: PA) The extra money was worth around £1,500 a year and was available to those who claimed Universal Credit - but not older benefits such as Employment Support Allowance (ESA), Job Seekers Allowance (JSA) and Income Support, despite many being registered disabled. The increase, which lasted from April 2020 to October 2021 was to help recipients pay for additional costs incurred during the coronavirus crisis and subsequent lockdowns. Campaign groups have said the move has disproportionately affected the disabled. Read More The court admitted that there was a greater proportion of disabled persons in receipt of legacy benefits, compared to disabled people on Universal Credit, reported the Mirror . But while the court accepted that there was discrimination towards disabled people on legacy benefits, the judge ruled that the difference in treatment was justified. A DWP spokesperson said at the time: “We welcome that the Court found in our favour. The temporary £20 uplift for Universal Credit claimants ensured vital support was given to those facing the most financial disruption due to the pandemic.” John's basic pension and disability benefits are just enough to get by, he says, but with the cost of living spiking soon, he doesn't know how long that can go on for (Image: ABNM Photography) Lawyers representing the claimants called the result "extremely disappointing" and a "devastating blow" to millions of sick and disabled families, halting the the fight for the £1,500 in support to be backdated to those who missed out while suffering hardship. They have, this week, launched a challenge to the decision in the courts by lodging an application to appeal the ruling. Universal Credit is slowly replacing legacy benefits but the process will not be complete until 2024 at the earliest. This includes around 1.9 million people who claim ESA, along with those who get Income Support and JSA. Read More Falling through the net After years of hitting his own bureaucratic brick walls, Salfordian John, who wishes not to share his surname, says he doesn’t know where to turn for help anymore. “If it were to get to the stage where the outgoings were outpacing income, that’s where I’d be finding the problems,” he adds. “Having to use a food bank would be my worst nightmare. Touch wood I’ve not had to do that up to now. “But I’ve got one of those feelings you get that things are going to get worse before they get better. “It’s not as though I can go and take a part time job now. I don’t have that sort of health to be able to do that. It’s a real sense of apprehension.” Read More He feels he is falling through the net of care, saying he has faced difficulties getting help from the NHS during the pandemic, not helped by his isolation. “In November, 2019, I was referred to hospital for surgery on my shoulder," John recounts. "At the pre-op, the staff asked me if I had somebody to take me home, I said no and they said, ‘sorry, we can’t do it’. “That was the last I heard from the hospital and my GP about [the procedure]. “I got some information from a friend about what could relieve the pain, it worked in a fashion, but I’ve still had no formal treatment." Oaklands Hospital (Image: Google Street View) After being approached by the Manchester Evening News , the hospital today, March 4, got in touch with John to arrange a new appointment. "All independent sector providers entered into a national agreement to support the NHS during the pandemic," said a spokesperson for Oaklands Hospital, in Lancaster Road, Salford. "Oaklands Hospital partnered with Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust to move the trust’s Intestinal Failure Unit into Oaklands Hospital. "This ensured that high risk patients needing urgent specialist care continued to receive treatment during the pandemic. "Unfortunately, this meant that some routine operations were postponed in order to treat the most critically ill patients. Oaklands Hospital will be in touch with Mr Kane directly to follow up on his care needs." John has been left wondering who can give him vital support as he struggles to do anything more than shop for basics (Image: ABNM Photography) What services say they can do to help vulnerable people For John, it's not just about what one hospital can do. “I’m sure more could be done for people like me, but organisations like the council have all had their funding cut," he says. “The council, the GP, the Department of Work and Pensions - all these places I would go to for help don’t seem to be interested anymore. You’re waiting two hours on the phone for someone to say you’ve called the wrong department.” In light of his story, the M.E.N. contacted other organisations intended to help struggling individuals. Salford councillor Sharmina August (Image: Salford City Council) Councillor Sharmina August, Lead Member for Inclusive Economy, Anti-Poverty and Equalities at Salford City Council, said council officers will contact the gentleman directly to discuss his circumstances and offer support. “Salford City Council and its partner organisations can offer a wide range of support including full benefit checks to make sure people are receiving all the money they are entitled to and signposting them to advice on energy costs and getting home insulation. We don’t want anyone to feel they are alone and have nowhere to turn,” she said. Salford City Council have suggested ways people can get in touch (Image: Eddie Garvey) “The simplest way to reach these services is to call the Spirit of Salford helpline which is free to call on 0800 952 1000 and is open Monday to Friday 8.30am to 6pm and Saturday 9am to 1pm or visit Eccles, Swinton, Pendleton or Walkden Gateway or Broughton Hub and speak to advisors face to face. “We currently have the Household Support Fund available until March 31 to help people who are struggling to buy food, pay bills and keep their homes warm over winter. It’s open to everyone, including people not receiving benefits, but proof of eligibility is required. We can also signpost people to advice on energy costs and making sure their home is well insulated. “Our Salford Assist service runs all year round to help people with emergency food and fuel payments and signpost them to further support.” People can also use the council’s BetterOff service, www.salford.gov.uk/betteroff . John is expecting things to deteriorate further before they improve (Image: ABNM Photography) A DWP Spokesperson added: “We recognise living with a long-term illness or disability can impact on living costs. That’s why we’ve made extra financial support available to those with disabilities, or those who care for them, through Personal Independence Payment (PIP), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Carer’s Allowance. “We know this has been a challenging time for many people, which is why we’re providing around £12bn this financial year and next, to help households across the country with the cost of living. "A further £9bn was announced by the Chancellor to protect against the impact of rising global energy prices and there is extra help for the most vulnerable with schemes including the Warm Home Discount, Winter Fuel Payments and the £500m Household Support Fund.” Anyone who thinks they may be eligible for extra financial can check online at www.gov.uk/benefits-calculators .

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  • When was Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust founded?

    Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust was founded in 1882.

  • Where is Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust's headquarters?

    Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust's headquarters is located at Stott Lane, Salford.

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