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Sagitta

sagitta.com

Founded Year

1997

Stage

Series D | Alive

Total Raised

$26.3M

Last Raised

$2.5M | 18 yrs ago

About Sagitta

Sagitta develops fiber-optic components machine automation.

Headquarters Location

7 Oser Avenue

Hauppauge, New York, 11788,

United States

631-952-9440

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Sagitta Patents

Sagitta has filed 1 patent.

patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

10/17/2016

11/19/2019

Electromagnetism, Capacitors, Electrical engineering, Linear induction motors, Video cards

Grant

Application Date

10/17/2016

Grant Date

11/19/2019

Title

Related Topics

Electromagnetism, Capacitors, Electrical engineering, Linear induction motors, Video cards

Status

Grant

Latest Sagitta News

Strange Long-Lasting Pulse of High-Energy Radiation Swept Over Earth

Oct 17, 2022

By Francis Reddy, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight CenterOctober 17, 2022 Astronomers think GRB 221009A represents the birth of a new black hole formed within the heart of a collapsing star. In this illustration, the black hole drives powerful jets of particles traveling near the speed of light. The jets pierce through the star, emitting X-rays and gamma rays as they stream into space. Credit: NASA/Swift/Cruz deWilde NASA’s Swift and Fermi Missions Detect Exceptional Cosmic Blast An unusually bright and long-lasting pulse of high-energy radiation swept over Earth Sunday, October 9, captivating astronomers around the world. The intense emission came from a gamma-ray burst (GRB) – the most powerful class of explosions in the universe – that ranks among the most luminous events known. A week ago, on Sunday morning Eastern time, a wave of X-rays and gamma rays passed through the solar system. It triggered detectors aboard NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope , Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory , and Wind spacecraft , as well as others. Around the world, telescopes were turned to the site to study the aftermath, and new observations continue. Swift’s X-Ray Telescope captured the afterglow of GRB 221009A about an hour after it was first detected. The bright rings form as a result of X-rays scattered from otherwise unobservable dust layers within our galaxy that lie in the direction of the burst. Credit: Credit: NASA/Swift/A. Beardmore (University of Leicester) Called GRB 221009A, the explosion provided an unexpectedly exciting start to the 10th Fermi Symposium, a gathering of gamma-ray astronomers now underway in Johannesburg, South Africa. “It’s safe to say this meeting really kicked off with a bang – everyone’s talking about this,” said Judy Racusin, a Fermi deputy project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who is attending the conference. Astronomers think GRB 221009A represents the birth of a new black hole formed within the heart of a collapsing star. As illustrated here, the black hole drives powerful jets of particles traveling near the speed of light. The jets pierce through the star, emitting X-rays and gamma rays as they stream into space. Credit: NASA/Swift/Cruz deWilde Originating from the direction of the constellation Sagitta, the signal traveled an estimated 1.9 billion years to reach Earth. Many astronomers believe it represents the birth cry of a new black hole , one that formed in the heart of a massive star collapsing under its own weight. In these circumstances, a developing black hole drives powerful jets of particles traveling near the speed of light. The energetic jets pierce through the star, emitting X-rays and gamma rays as they stream into space. This sequence constructed from Fermi Large Area Telescope data reveals the sky in gamma rays centered on the location of GRB 221009A. Each frame shows gamma rays with energies greater than 100 million electron volts (MeV), where brighter colors indicate a stronger gamma-ray signal. In total, they represent more than 10 hours of observations. The glow from the midplane of our Milky Way galaxy appears as a wide diagonal band. The image is about 20 degrees across. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration The burst also provided a long-awaited inaugural observing opportunity for a link between two experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) – NASA’s NICER X-ray telescope and a Japanese detector called the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Activated in April, the connection is dubbed the Orbiting High-energy Monitor Alert Network (OHMAN). It allows NICER to rapidly turn to outbursts detected by MAXI, actions that previously required intervention by scientists on the ground. “OHMAN provided an automated alert that enabled NICER to follow up within three hours, as soon as the source became visible to the telescope,” said Zaven Arzoumanian, the NICER science lead at Goddard. “Future opportunities could result in response times of a few minutes.” Images taken in visible light by Swift’s Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope show how the afterglow of GRB 221009A (circled) faded over the course of about 10 hours. The explosion appeared in the constellation Sagitta and occurred 1.9 billion years ago. The image is about 4 arcminutes across. Credit: NASA/Swift/B. Cenko The light from this ancient explosion brings with it valuable new insights into stellar collapse, the birth of a black hole, the behavior and interaction of matter near the speed of light, the conditions in a distant galaxy – and much more. Astronomers may not detect another GRB this bright for decades. Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected the burst for more than 10 hours, according to a preliminary analysis. One reason for the burst’s exceptional brightness and longevity is that, for a GRB, it lies relatively close to us. “This burst is much closer than typical GRBs, which is exciting because it allows us to detect many details that otherwise would be too faint to see,” said Roberta Pillera, a Fermi LAT Collaboration member who led initial communications about the burst and a doctoral student at the Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy. “But it’s also among the most energetic and luminous bursts ever seen regardless of distance, making it doubly exciting.”

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Sagitta Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • When was Sagitta founded?

    Sagitta was founded in 1997.

  • Where is Sagitta's headquarters?

    Sagitta's headquarters is located at 7 Oser Avenue, Hauppauge.

  • What is Sagitta's latest funding round?

    Sagitta's latest funding round is Series D.

  • How much did Sagitta raise?

    Sagitta raised a total of $26.3M.

  • Who are the investors of Sagitta?

    Investors of Sagitta include DFJ Tamir Fishman Ventures, Alice Ventures, Ascend Technology Ventures, Pitango Venture Capital, Viavi Solutions and 3 more.

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