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Pine Street Inn

pinestreetinn.org

Founded Year

1969

Stage

Grant | Alive

Total Raised

$30K

Last Raised

$30K | 3 yrs ago

About Pine Street Inn

Pine Street Inn is New England's leading provider of housing, shelter, street outreach and job training to homeless men and women in Greater Boston.

Headquarters Location

444 Harrison Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts, 02118,

United States

617-892-9100

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Latest Pine Street Inn News

Amid end to COVID help, homelessness surging in many cities

Oct 6, 2022

By KATHLEEN RONAYNE, MICHAEL CASEY and GEOFF MULVIHILL - Associated Press Oct 6, 2022 1 of 18 Eric Santos uses a suitcase that he keeps all of his possessions in as a table while having a cup of coffee at ShowUp Sac, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing and showers to people experiencing homelessness in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. Santos, who was recently evicted from his apartment and now sleeps on a park bench, frequents Show Up Sac, for meals and other assistance. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Eric Santos, right, gives a hug of thanks to Karry Fowler, left, a volunteer at Showup Sac, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing and showers to people experiencing homelessness in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Oct.4, 2022. Santos, who was recently evicted from his apartment and now sleeps on a park bench, frequents Show Up Sac, for meals and other assistance. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Eric Santos leaves a portable shower at ShowUp Sac, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing and showers to people experiencing homelessness in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Oct.4, 2022. Santos, who was recently evicted from his apartment and now sleeps on a park bench, frequents Show Up Sac, for meals and other assistance. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP FILE - Shelley Sanders watches as a loader known as "the claw" removes items left behind at the homeless camp where she had been living as authorities move in to clear the area of people camping illegally in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, April 11, 2022. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Workers put a roof on one of the Pallet sleeping cabins being built at the Sacramento County's Safe Stay Community in Sacramento, Calif., on Wednesday, July 27, 2022. The safe community was designed to provide 100 cabins for homeless people to sleep in, with running power and sanitation available. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count conducted in February 2022. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Aya Kilma, 47, hugs her dog, Nelly, at ShowUp Sac a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, and showers to people experiencing homelessness in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Karry Fowler, right, hands a pair of shoes to a homeless person at ShowUp Sac in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. ShowUp Sac is a nonprofit that provides food, clothing and showers to people experiencing homelessness. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP People line up for food and and other help at ShowUp Sac in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022. ShowUp Sac is a nonprofit that provides food, clothing and showers to people experiencing homelessness. Sacramento County had more than 9,200 people experiencing homelessness during this year's annual count, conducted in February. Rich Pedroncelli - staff, AP Lewis Lopez speaks to reporters from The Associated Press, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in his apartment in the Dorchester neighborhood, of Boston. After cycling in and out of Boston shelters for several years, Lewis Lopez finally secured keys to his own apartment. No longer fearing that his possessions would be stolen or that he would get into fights over food, the 61-year-old cook felt he had finally gotten his life back. Steven Senne - staff, AP Lewis Lopez steps out of the front door to his apartment building, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in the Dorchester neighborhood, of Boston. After cycling in and out of Boston shelters for several years, Lewis Lopez finally secured keys to his own apartment. No longer fearing that his possessions would be stolen or that he would get into fights over food, the 61-year-old cook felt he had finally gotten his life back. Steven Senne - staff, AP Lewis Lopez places his hand on his Bible, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in his apartment in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston. After cycling in and out of Boston shelters for several years, Lewis Lopez finally secured keys to his own apartment. No longer fearing that his possessions would be stolen or that he would get into fights over food, the 61-year-old cook felt he had finally gotten his life back. Steven Senne - staff, AP FILE - The tents of a homeless camp line the sidewalk in an area commonly known as Mass and Cass, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021, in Boston. The city has since shut down the encampment, going tent to tent to assess the needs of those living there and referring more than 150 to shelters and other housing. Michael Dwyer - staff, AP Pine Street Inn's Director of Outreach Michael Andrick, right, and Kyra Boyer, left, a clinical supervisor on the behavioral health outreach team, talk with a homeless man, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2022, in Boston. The Pine Street Inn's outreach program is part of a years-long campaign in Boston to target people who are on the street for longer than a year with the goal of getting them permanently housed. Michael Dwyer - staff, AP Pine Street Inn's Director of Outreach Michael Andrick, center, and Kyra Boyer, left, a clinical supervisor on the behavioral health outreach team, talk with a homeless man, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2022, in Boston. The Pine Street Inn's outreach program is part of a years-long campaign in Boston to target people who are on the street for longer than a year with the goal of getting them permanently housed. Michael Dwyer - staff, AP Steven Hamilton sits on his bed in his newly acquired apartment as he puts on sneakers before going for a walk, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022, in Boston. Hamilton was homeless for over three years before moving into the apartment in September 2022. Steven Senne - staff, AP Steven Hamilton speaks to a reporter from The Associated Press, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022, in his newly acquired apartment, in Boston. Hamilton was homeless for over three years before moving into the apartment in September 2022. Steven Senne - staff, AP Steven Hamilton locks the door to his newly acquired apartment, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022, in Boston. Hamilton was homeless for over three years before moving into the apartment in September 2022. Steven Senne - staff, AP Steven Hamilton, of Boston, walks away from his apartment building on his way to a store, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022, in Boston. Hamilton was homeless for over three years before moving into the apartment in September 2022. Steven Senne - staff, AP The Associated Press tallied results from city-by-city Point in Time surveys conducted earlier this year and found the number of people without homes is up overall compared with 2020 in areas reporting results so far. Some of the biggest increases are in West Coast cities such as Sacramento and Portland, Oregon, where growing homelessness has become a humanitarian crisis and political football. Numbers are also up in South Dakota, Prince George’s County, Maryland, and Asheville, North Carolina. Research has shown places seeing spikes in homelessness often lack affordable housing. Making matters worse, pandemic government relief programs — including anti-eviction measures, emergency rental assistance and a child tax credit that kept people housed who may have been on the streets otherwise — are ending. In Sacramento, where rents are soaring and officials disagree on how best to deal with the problem, homelessness has jumped 68% from 2020 to 2022 — the most among larger cities reporting results so far. The surge has been driven in part by the city’s legacy of being more affordable than other California cities, which has attracted new residents, overwhelming the housing market. A Zillow analysis found the average rent in July was $2,300 — a 28% increase since July 2019, before the pandemic began. Sacramento County’s median income was about $70,000 in 2020, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg has made reducing homelessness a priority since he took office in 2017. But so far, it hasn’t been enough. “People are becoming homeless much faster than we are getting them off the street,” Steinberg told the AP. Steinberg has advocated for adopting a legal right to shelter and a legal obligation for people to accept it when offered. The approach has drawn some criticism from advocates who say it’s just a means of taking the problem out of the public eye, without providing meaningful help for those who need it. County officials voted in August to ban camping along Sacramento’s American River Parkway, with a misdemeanor charge for people who don’t comply. City voters will decide in November on a ballot measure requiring the city to open hundreds more shelter beds. But it would only take effect if the county agrees to pony up money for mental health and substance abuse treatment. Still, the rise in homelessness is not uniform across the country. In Boston, the number of people sleeping on the streets and in shelters has dropped 25% over two years as advocates focused on finding permanent housing for those on the streets the longest. In some cities, “housing first” policies intended to move the homeless into permanent homes have paid off. And while the pandemic brought economic chaos, an eviction moratorium, boosted unemployment payments and family tax credits prevented some people from becoming homeless at all. Along with Boston, numbers have fallen sharply in Houston, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Even in California, homeless counts are down in San Francisco, and growth has slowed significantly in Los Angeles. In Boston, Steven Hamilton moved into a new apartment in September after decades staying on a friend or relative’s couch or in a homeless shelter. With the help of a program run by the Boston Medical Center, he was able to get a subsidized apartment in a public housing development. His portion of monthly rent is $281 — or about 30% of his Social Security payments. “I’m grateful,” he said. “I am not looking to move nowhere else. I am going to stay here until eternity. I lost a lot of stuff. I’m not going through that again.” Hamilton’s studio apartment is the result of a Boston strategy whereby the city and area nonprofits use extensive outreach to get people who’ve been on the streets for over a year into apartments and then provide services such as drug treatment and life-skills training like budgeting with the help of case managers. Those efforts were bolstered last year by a city program that pulled together a list of homeless individuals to target for housing and other services. The city also moved to shut down one of its biggest homeless encampments, going tent-to-tent to assess the needs of those living there and referring more than 150 to shelters and other housing. The city has been able to reduce the number of homeless people to about 6,000, down 25% since 2020. Boston’s shelters have become less crowded even as Zillow found the city’s average rent rose to $2,800 this summer — up 13% from three years earlier. Housing advocates say prioritizing chronically homeless people ensures funds have the greatest impact, since the long-term homeless spend so much time in shelters. It also costs less to provide permanent housing than to provide temporary shelter. Casey reported from Boston. Mulvihill reported from Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Kavish Harjai in Los Angeles contributed. —— Harjai is a corps members for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues. Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Pine Street Inn Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • When was Pine Street Inn founded?

    Pine Street Inn was founded in 1969.

  • Where is Pine Street Inn's headquarters?

    Pine Street Inn's headquarters is located at 444 Harrison Avenue, Boston.

  • What is Pine Street Inn's latest funding round?

    Pine Street Inn's latest funding round is Grant.

  • How much did Pine Street Inn raise?

    Pine Street Inn raised a total of $30K.

  • Who are the investors of Pine Street Inn?

    Investors of Pine Street Inn include Tufts Health Plan.

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