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Founded Year

1831

About New York University

New York University is a research university based in New York, New York that features various academic programs.

New York University Headquarter Location

70 Washington Square South

New York, New York, 10012,

United States

212-998-1212

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Who is Parag Agrawal, Twitter’s new CEO?

Nov 30, 2021

On the stand in her fraud trial, the former Theranos CEO alleged sexual and emotional abuse by her former professional and personal partner, Sunny Balwani. On the fourth day of her testimony, Elizabeth Holmes broke down for the first time as she discussed her relationship with Sunny Balwani. Photo: Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images November 29, 2021 Nat Rubio-Licht is a Los Angeles-based news writer at Protocol. They graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in newspaper and online journalism in May 2020. Prior to joining the team, they worked at the Los Angeles Business Journal as a technology and aerospace reporter. November 29, 2021 This story contains mention of sexual assault. Elizabeth Holmes has blamed many people along the way for the swift downfall of her blood-testing startup, Theranos. But on the fourth day of her testimony in the fraud case against her, she pointed the finger at the man who was once her close professional and personal partner: Sunny Balwani. Along with testifying that Balwani, former COO and president of Theranos, was in charge of its lab operations and finances with little oversight, Holmes testified that he controlled her life down to the minute, including daily schedules, diet plans and critiques on the way she talked in the course of a decade-long romantic relationship which they hid from the company. Balwani faces his own fraud charges related to his work at Theranos, for which a separate trial is scheduled to start in January. Verbal abuse occurred often, Holmes testified. She said Balwani told her what to eat, how to exercise discipline and how to act more like a man in order to better lead Theranos. According to Holmes, Balwani said she came across as a “little girl” and needed to rein in her excitement in interactions. In one note presented to the jury, Balwani wrote to Holmes "do everything I say — word for word.” Another handwritten note listed out tenets for her to live by: "I do not react. As Airtable’s co-founder, Andrew spearheads Airtable’s long-term product bets and represents the voice of the customer in major product decisions. After co-founding the company, he helped scale Airtable’s original product and engineering teams. He previously led the redesign of Google's flagship Maps product, and before that was a product manager for Android. November 10, 2021 The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that by 2026, the shortage of engineers in the U.S. will exceed 1.2 million, while 545,000 software developers will have left the market by that time. Meanwhile, business is becoming increasingly more digital-first, and teams need the tools in place to keep distributed teams aligned and able to respond quickly to changing business needs. That means businesses need to build powerful workplace applications without relying on developers. In fact, according to Gartner , by 2025, 70% of new applications developed by enterprises will use low-code or no-code technologies and, by 2023, there will be at least four times as many active citizen developers as professional developers at large enterprises. We're on the cusp of a big shift in how businesses operate and how organization wide innovation happens. Giving people the power to build software that's not only fully customized to their teams' needs and workflows but is also visual and simple will do more than improve how their organizations operate — it will transform work as we know it. Allowing rigid, one-size-fits-all software to dictate your teams' workflows will be a relic of the past as teams unlock the efficiency and power that comes with building hyper-optimized applications for their specific workflows and teams. When the people that use the software can customize it to adapt to their needs on the fly, teams can more easily manage rapid change, adjusting the software to adapt to new processes and business needs without a developer's time or resources. And given the increasing rate of change in the world today, this ability to move faster isn't just a nice-to-have; it's mission-critical for staying competitive. Over the past 15 years, 40% of companies on the Fortune 500 have disappeared from the list. Although some of them simply saw their growth eclipsed by upstarts, nearly all faced outside disruption they were ill-equipped to react to. Fortunately, today's leading companies have an advantage that their predecessors didn't — workplace technology that gives them the agility of the most successful and disruptive startups. When people can move beyond one-size-fits-all software and build the right solutions around self-designed business processes, it unlocks the differentiation needed to compete in increasingly crowded markets. This type of agility can be a company's secret sauce as team members, regardless of role or function, are empowered to drive innovation across the organization. We founded Airtable on the notion that the people doing the work within companies should be the ones building the software they use. For over a decade, we've offered the basic building blocks of software for people without advanced technical skills to build the applications they need. Today more than 250,000 organizations, including 80% of the Fortune 100, use Airtable to build workflows that precisely fit their team's needs and will scale with them as they grow. With Interface Designer, our newest feature, teams can now create complete, three-part applications in Airtable — a flexible database layer for their most critical information, a logic layer that automates manual or complex work and now an interface layer that allows people to customize how others interact with what they build. Interface Designer's simple drag-and-drop tools are built for anyone to use to simplify, contextualize and visualize their data and present their workflow as a full application that their team can easily view, interact with and contribute to. Creators can build multiple interfaces to make complex data accessible, actionable and shareable in a visual way that's uniquely powerful to each person in their organization. Creator-designed software not only needs to work: It needs to be dead simple for everyone in an organization to be able to easily understand and interact with it. Simple drag-and-drop custom layouts mean that it takes minutes, not hours, to create an interface and share a full application with teams. Now teams can easily build consumer-grade applications that help them reach their most ambitious outcomes faster. And instead of hiring a developer or waiting for an IT department's resources to free up, the people closest to the work — marketing, product and HR team members — can build custom interfaces tailored specifically to how their teams operate and customized to how others in their organization think and work. Whether it's reporting on progress to executives, gathering information from other teams or creating review and approval processes, people can now build simple and beautiful, yet powerful, applications within Airtable to orchestrate how work gets done. Interface Designer enables teams to build complete applications that give teammates the information they need to take action. Mia Lama, a product operations specialist at Twilio, for example, needs to customize how information is shared across several different teams to ensure people have the right context and clear understanding of what's needed from them. She shared: "As our workflows have evolved, they've become more complex and cross-functional, making it difficult to provide context and clear processes. With Interface Designer, we can customize the way data is shared across teams, allowing us to make right decisions in real time." Empowering everyone to create the exact applications they need to manage their work -- apps that look and feel like the ones we use in our personal lives -- will let us accomplish more and unlock new sources of creativity for the world. The next generation of innovators won't be Silicon Valley engineers, they'll be marketers, product managers, operations managers, and content creators who have the new superpower to build software that drives progress for their organizations. Keep ReadingShow less Issie Lapowsky ( @issielapowsky ) is Protocol's chief correspondent, covering the intersection of technology, politics, and national affairs. She also oversees Protocol's fellowship program. Previously, she was a senior writer at Wired, where she covered the 2016 election and the Facebook beat in its aftermath. Prior to that, Issie worked as a staff writer for Inc. magazine, writing about small business and entrepreneurship. She has also worked as an on-air contributor for CBS News and taught a graduate-level course at New York University's Center for Publishing on how tech giants have affected publishing. November 29, 2021 In his note Monday announcing his departure from Twitter, Jack Dorsey delivered a warm welcome to the company’s new CEO, a fond farewell to the tweeps he’s leaving behind and a quick shout-out to his mom. He also fired a warning shot at certain other founder-CEOs who shall remain nameless. “There’s a lot of talk about the importance of a company being ‘founder-led.’ Ultimately I believe that’s severely limiting and a single point of failure,” Dorsey wrote. “There aren’t many companies that get to this level. And there aren’t many founders that choose their company over their own ego.” Whether that’s the real reason for Dorsey’s departure after nearly 16 years as a company leader and two stints as its CEO remains in question, and maybe even in doubt. Until today Dorsey was, after all, the simultaneous CEO of two publicly traded companies — one of which he was nearly ousted from last year — and his apparent new calling in life, bitcoin, has precious little to do with a social network for sharing quippy takes on pop culture and global catastrophe. That there are other dynamics at play in Dorsey’s decision to hand over the CEO role to Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal, effective immediately, is almost certain. But Dorsey’s point about founder-led companies is still well-taken: Maybe, he seems to suggest, the people responsible for dreaming up what a company could be at the beginning aren’t always — or even ever — the best people to run it after it has become something else entirely. The company Dorsey leaves behind is almost unrecognizable from the one he co-founded in 2006, or even the one he returned to as CEO in 2015. That June, when Twitter announced Dorsey’s encore as CEO, his biggest obstacle was finding a way to jumpstart sluggish growth. Less than one week later, Donald Trump descended an escalator inside Trump Tower, announcing his bid for the presidency and resetting the agenda of Dorsey’s next six years. Suddenly, Dorsey was grappling not just with demands from investors — though those continued — but also with the world’s first Tweeter-in-Chief, who used the platform for years to prolifically spew hate and conspiracies with little interruption from Twitter and who, in doing it, wrote a playbook for global strongmen and fringe politicians to follow. Under Dorsey’s lead, Twitter initially took a hands-off approach, crafting new rules that allowed elected officials to say just about whatever they wanted. When you’re a global leader, Trump’s presidency proved, they let you do it. Trump’s election ushered in a new era of scrutiny for social media companies, Twitter included. As the extent of the information warfare playing out on tech platforms became clearer, Washington wanted Twitter and others to do something about the bots and the trolls and, depending on who you asked, the censorship — or lack thereof — of some conservatives. These are the problems Agrawal now inherits — problems Dorsey and his co-founders couldn’t have imagined in Twitter’s earliest days. To Dorsey’s credit, Twitter has made progress on some of these fronts. In 2019, Dorsey embarked on an apology tour of sorts, taking seemingly every interview as a chance to lament Twitter’s failures and commit to making the platform a “healthier” place. The company seems to have earnestly sought to deliver on that goal. At a time when Google was firing its top AI ethicists and Facebook was disbanding its civic integrity team, Twitter was recruiting top tech critics to oversee its ethical AI work and expand the team with Dorsey’s direct blessing. The company has also experimented in plain sight with tools that discourage toxic conversations before they start and enable auto-blocking of hateful tweets. It’s opened up its full archive to researchers so they can study the platform from the outside in. And of course, early this year, after wallpapering his account in warning labels, Twitter finally banned Trump for life. But far from relishing in the decision, Dorsey described the ban as “a failure of ours ultimately to promote healthy conversation.” “Having to take these actions fragment the public conversation. They divide us,” Dorsey tweeted at the time. “They limit the potential for clarification, redemption, and learning. And [it] sets a precedent I feel is dangerous: the power an individual or corporation has over a part of the global public conversation.” Dorsey made much the same argument then that he is now: That no one person, including himself, should have so much power — and certainly not the one person who, by virtue of having founded a company, may be the most blinkered to its failures. Plenty of prominent tech founders have stepped down from leadership roles at their companies: Larry Page, Sergey Brin and Bill Gates, to name a few. That leaves Mark Zuckerberg as the last obvious Big Tech target of Dorsey’s admonitions. Zuckerberg has also often lamented the concentration of power in his hands, but only to urge governments to impose light, industry-approved regulations, not to advocate for his own removal. As recent leaks from Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen have shown, Zuckerberg remains deeply, personally involved in everything from annual staffing decisions to whether Facebook should bow to pressure to censor dissidents in Vietnam. These and other revelations have led to constant calls for Zuckerberg to step down and let someone else lead the global behemoth that was once a dorm-room experiment. Though he didn’t name him outright, Dorsey’s note does seem like yet another not-so-thinly veiled dig at Zuckerberg. Of course, it was the cult of the founder that brought Dorsey back as CEO of Twitter in 2015. Even though he was simultaneously CEO of Square, a position he still holds, hopes were high that Dorsey’s ties to Twitter’s roots would help him more clearly envision its future. Six years later, he’s stepping back only now that he has another dream to chase — and another company to run. From Your Site Articles Benjamin Pimentel ( @benpimentel ) covers fintech from San Francisco. He has reported on many of the biggest tech stories over the past 20 years for the San Francisco Chronicle, Dow Jones MarketWatch and Business Insider, from the dot-com crash, the rise of cloud computing, social networking and AI to the impact of the Great Recession and the COVID crisis on Silicon Valley and beyond. He can be reached at bpimentel@protocol.com or via Signal at (510)731-8429. November 29, 2021 Jack Dorsey’s sudden exit from Twitter underlines the tech pioneer’s growing fixation with crypto — a passion that has forced a sudden resolution of the odd situation of a single individual leading two large tech companies. It’s now clear that Square is Dorsey’s favorite child and needs all of his attention to advance the role it could play in popularizing bitcoin, the best-known cryptocurrency. "If I were not at Square or Twitter I'd be working on bitcoin," Dorsey said at a cryptocurrency conference in Miami in June. At the time, he said “both companies have a role to play.” But Twitter’s presence in the crypto world has proven minimal, despite efforts like letting users accept tips in bitcoin and hiring Tess Rinearson to lead a crypto team. Twitter’s CFO recently dissed the idea of holding bitcoin in its corporate treasury. Square, meanwhile, has been riding the crypto wave since its Cash App added bitcoin trading almost four years ago . By 2021, 1 million Square users were buying bitcoin for the first time on Cash App. Square announced in February that 5% of Square’s total cash was in bitcoin. In June, Blockstream, the bitcoin mining company, announced that Square was investing $5 million in a solar-powered mining operation. In July, Dorsey said Square was building “a new business” that would operate alongside divisions like Cash App and Tidal to build tools for developers, focused on bitcoin. Square also helped set up the Cryptocurrency Open Patent Alliance, which aims to defend the industry against patent trolls. Recently, Square also announced that it was developing its own hardware crypto wallet “to make bitcoin custody more mainstream.” “Bitcoin is for everyone,” Dorsey said in a tweet . “It’s important to us to build an inclusive product.” Despite those moves, Square remains a relative newbie in crypto. Bitcoin trading has juiced its revenue lately, but it’s going up against nimbler, faster-moving competitors like Coinbase and Robinhood. “Jack wants all in on crypto,” Constellation Research analyst Ray Wang told Protocol. “He doesn’t want to miss the next big thing.” One challenge for Dorsey and Square is his well-known allegiance to bitcoin , which is increasingly just one cryptocurrency among many, and not the most technically sophisticated one. Wang says Square needs “to be in the middle of smart contracts,” a technology most firmly established on the Ethereum blockchain. A coming upgrade to bitcoin called Taproot promises to facilitate smart contracts using bitcoin, but it would seem smarter to spread one’s bets. There’s still time for Square to expand its crypto footprint, though, which makes the timing of Dorsey’s move significant. “It’s early in the marketplace,” Wang said. “This space will be won by a few players. We are in 1997 for the internet.” From Your Site Articles Lizzy Lawrence ( @LizzyLaw_ ) is a reporter at Protocol, covering tools and productivity in the workplace. She's a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, where she studied sociology and international studies. She served as editor in chief of The Michigan Daily, her school's independent newspaper. She's based in D.C., and can be reached at llawrence@protocol.com. November 29, 2021 Night kayaking and rainforest zip-lining in Puerto Rico. Racing go-karts and launching cooking competitions. Building dog houses in the Arizona desert. These are some of the in-person activities Trello organized in the before-COVID times. Expectations were high when the company scheduled its annual corporate retreat for 2021, since this time it would be in a virtual world. Trello has embraced remote work for most of its 10-year existence, according to co-founder Michael Pryor. Like many remote-work companies, Trello organized yearly retreats to turn co-workers into friends. Called "Trello Together," everyone would gather for three days to chat and have fun. With the pandemic, they had to get creative. Liz Leary, Trello's employee experiences manager, has been the brain power behind "Trello Together" since it began five years ago. Around Christmas 2020, she joked with a colleague about him buying her an Oculus Quest 2 headset so they could hang out together in VR. Trello's leadership team had already been holding VR hangouts every Friday. "We just thought, wouldn't it be funny if we got our entire team Oculus Quest 2 headsets so we could all hang out in VR and start building that connective tissue back up?" Leary said. Trello leadership, including Pryor, agreed. Virtual-reality games can serve the same function as a happy hour drink post-work, Pryor explained. Ostensibly, you go for the drinks, but in reality you're there to have fun and bond with your coworkers. "You're playing VR golf, that's the primary purpose, but you spend half an hour shooting the shit about random stuff," Pryor said. After the holidays, Leary dove deep into planning for the April 2021 event. She helped coordinate the purchase and distribution of about 275 Oculus headsets — in secret, no less. Everyone at Trello unboxed them over Zoom together. During the actual event, employees walked through a virtual replica of Trello's New York office, built with the help of Frame, an immersive meeting platform from Virbela. After, the team split into groups to compete in a mini-golf tournament. Along the way, Trello managers learned quite a bit about how to pull off an effective VR company retreat. Add in the personal touches Getting the virtual office right was crucial to Leary. She worked closely with Frame's engineers, who were receptive to the small, Trello-specific details Leary wanted. The virtual office contained replicas of Trello's murals and the all-important espresso machine. Most importantly, it featured a tribute to a beloved Trello employee who passed away a few years ago. Newer employees got to know an essential part of Trello's culture, while long-term employees reveled in the familiarity of Trello's office. "I wanted something that was going to evoke the connective feeling that we were all missing," Leary said. "The New York office is the birthplace of Trello, and it just makes sense for it to be there." Understand that VR isn't for everybody "There are many different reasons why somebody wouldn't want to use a headset," Leary said. VR can cause motion sickness, more often with women and people over 40 . Trello leadership took this very seriously while planning. This is part of the reason Leary chose Frame to design the office, because it allows users to access their world on browsers. She also streamed the mini-golf tournament finals for Trello employees to watch later. "I tried to be very thoughtful in making sure all the events were inclusive," she said. "There are many reasons why someone wouldn't want to use a headset." Some people may be excited by VR tech but have little experience. Leary said she communicated with staff frequently to ensure everyone was ready for the event. She put together training materials in Confluence, the corporate wiki made by Trello's parent company, Atlassian. She set up Trello boards tracking progress and planned demo sessions for employees to come and try out their headsets. Despite your best efforts, some employees inevitably miss preparation opportunities — glancing over training emails is in our DNA. "People are just going to be people, and when you have 200-plus people, they're just not going to do it sometimes," said Trello employee Tammy Lam. "The day of, there was a scramble when it was time to log in." Brace yourself for technical hiccups — even within a tech company Some Trello employees found themselves floating by the ceiling and unable to get down when they entered the virtual office. Others had trouble even accessing the space. "Assume positive intent going into this, because it's very early stages," Pryor said. "Don't assume any of this stuff is going to be super easy to use: It's not at that consumer level yet." When people had trouble getting into the VR world, they turned to their co-workers for help. This is why it's essential for someone to stay in the real world and help those who need it. Leary stayed outside of VR for almost all of the event so employees had someone to turn to if they faced technical difficulties. "You need somebody outside of VR watching Slack," Lam said. "Once people get booted out of VR, they have no way to communicate that they need help other than in the physical world." Leary conducted a survey after the event, and one major takeaway was the necessity of a Zoom running parallel to the event. It can serve as technical support, but also as a break for people overwhelmed by VR. "People are able to come in and recharge their batteries, both personal and headset," Leary said. No work. Just fun. A company VR retreat should have nothing to do with work. That goes for in-person retreats, too. It's the best way to foster meaningful bonding. "You let people relax and chit-chat," Leary said. "You're not forcing people into awkward team-building and awkward icebreakers." When people are comfortable with each other, creative collaborations follow. When designing an event like this, the goal should be serendipitous connection — those sought-after interactions we lost when the pandemic made in-person meetings unsafe. Pryor said while the virtual office created a sense of togetherness, it was harder for people to naturally spark up conversations. Which makes sense, he said, because in the real world, coworkers may bond more comfortably outside of the office. The mini-golf tournament was more conducive to casual conversation. Buying Oculus headsets for every employee may not be feasible for a company, but Leary still urges companies to "spend the money" — not necessarily on Oculuses, but to invest in well-coordinated employee retreats in general. It's always worth it, she said. From Your Site Articles

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Expert Collections containing New York University

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New York University has filed 230 patents.

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  • Clusters of differentiation
  • Immunology
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