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Microlink Devices

mldevices.com

Stage

Loan | Alive

Total Raised

$7.59M

Last Raised

$680K | 3 yrs ago

About Microlink Devices

MicroLink Devices specializes in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of semiconductor structures for use in communications devices, and in the growth and fabrication of advanced solar cells for space, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), and terrestrial use. MicroLink also performs engineering research and development services: it has collaborated on commercial research and development projects with many other companies, and has been a prime federal contractor on many solar cell, optoelectronics, and electronics projects.

Headquarters Location

6457 West Howard St

Niles, Illinois, 60714,

United States

847-588-3001

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Expert Collections containing Microlink Devices

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Microlink Devices is included in 4 Expert Collections, including Renewable Energy.

R

Renewable Energy

4,020 items

This collection contains upstream and downstream solar companies, as well as those who manufacture and sell products that are powered by solar technology.

S

Semiconductors, Chips, and Advanced Electronics

6,248 items

Companies in this collection develop everything from microprocessors to flash memory, integrated circuits specifically for quantum computing and artificial intelligence to OLED for displays, massive production fabs to circuit design firms, and everything in between.

G

Grid and Utility

953 items

This collection includes companies that are working on software and hardware to improve grids, utilizing new pricing models, and developing microgrids.

A

Aerospace

2,261 items

Microlink Devices Patents

Microlink Devices has filed 25 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Solar cells
  • Energy conversion
  • Photovoltaics
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

4/6/2018

7/26/2022

Semiconductor device fabrication, Photovoltaics, Solar cells, Microtechnology, Energy conversion

Grant

Application Date

4/6/2018

Grant Date

7/26/2022

Title

Related Topics

Semiconductor device fabrication, Photovoltaics, Solar cells, Microtechnology, Energy conversion

Status

Grant

Latest Microlink Devices News

CSconnected sponsors Wales regional session at UK CBI Annual Conference

Dec 3, 2021

The role of the world’s first compound semiconductor cluster CSconnected (formed in 2017) in driving jobs growth, exports and economic prosperity was centre stage at the 2021 Annual Conference of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), chaired by Lord Bilimoria, on 22-24 November. At the Wales regional session of ‘Seize the Moment’, CSconnected director Chris Meadows was joined by professor Max Munday of Cardiff Business School and Steve Whitby of MicroLink Devices UK Ltd to outline the strength of the industry cluster in South Wales. Supporting UK Government’s ‘levelling up’ agenda, the event was held at Swansea University’s Bay Campus. CSconnected is based on winning a £43m UKRI Strength in Places bid and brings together more than a dozen organizations under a collective brand for advanced semiconductor-related activities in Wales. Munday, director of the Welsh Economic Research Unit, told delegates that the emerging CS cluster and its high-tech companies bucked the general economic trend in Wales by creating high-quality, well-paid jobs. “We have a long productivity tail in the Welsh economy, and our GVA [gross value added] is consistently below the UK average, which is difficult to change,” he added. “The CSconnected cluster companies employ around 1400 full-time employees on salaries which are much higher than the average in Wales. The industry spends money in Wales to support another 2000 jobs, contributing around £170m of gross value added for Wales,” Munday continues. “It creates a different picture than the usual inward investment pattern in South Wales. Some of the main cluster companies are headquartered here, are R&D intensive and export levels are very high – in many cases over 90% of manufacturing output goes to North America and the Far East. Cluster members have strong links with universities in Wales too,” he adds. “In economic development terms, it is a sector of interest, creating a richness that we don’t see in some other areas of inward investment. Output in the CS cluster sector has been maintained through Brexit, and through Covid-19.” Meadows told the conference that the cluster aimed to push job creation from 1500 to 5000 over the next five years by developing start-ups and through attracting inward investment. “If we could attract a design team from just one of the mega companies, like Facebook, Apple or Google, it would bring an enormous supply chain with it. The growth potential of CSconnected is certainly there.” Whitby said MicroLink’s recently opened research facility in Baglan Bay Innovation Centre stood to benefit by working within the cluster. “We will manufacture in the UK with different toolsets which the cluster may provide. We aim to use robotics processes, and increase efficiencies in the coatings on cells, packaging for different markets. The cluster offers us huge potential to do those things here in Wales.” At the earlier UK CBI session, Lord Bilimoria, chancellor at the University of Birmingham, thanked CSconnected for sponsoring the Wales regional session and urged industry to continue to tap into university expertise. He noted that the UK produced 14% of the most highly cited academic research papers worldwide, and remained one of the most entrepreneurial countries in the world. Cardiff University’s Institute for Compound Semiconductors was a founding member of CSconnected. The partnership paved the way for the creation of the Compound Semiconductor Centre (CSC), a for-profit partnership with wafer supplier IQE plc of Cardiff, Wales, UK. The Institute will move to the Translational Research Hub and its adjacent ERDF-funded cleanroom in 2022 on Cardiff Innovation Campus. See related items:

Microlink Devices Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • Where is Microlink Devices's headquarters?

    Microlink Devices's headquarters is located at 6457 West Howard St, Niles.

  • What is Microlink Devices's latest funding round?

    Microlink Devices's latest funding round is Loan.

  • How much did Microlink Devices raise?

    Microlink Devices raised a total of $7.59M.

  • Who are the investors of Microlink Devices?

    Investors of Microlink Devices include Paycheck Protection Program, ARPA-E and U.S. Department of Energy.

  • Who are Microlink Devices's competitors?

    Competitors of Microlink Devices include BT Imaging, 1366 Technologies, XJet, Accustrata, Tisol and 13 more.

Compare Microlink Devices to Competitors

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AOS Solar

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Tisol

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