Laicos company logo

The profile is currenly unclaimed by the seller. All information is provided by CB Insights.

laicos.com

About Laicos

Youre one social person. Get one social app! Fuse brings together all your favorite social networks in one unified experience. A single feed of updates from your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn (and more to come) friends allows you to see what the people you follow across all networks are up to. Your personal interactions, messages, and search are there too!* Features: - Multiple Accounts. Add all your accounts for networks we support! Fuse loves it. You can quickly turn each network on or off in the app depending on your preference for the moment.- Unified Feed Views. One network per tab No way! All your networks are in one place. - Powerful Sharing. Share to all your networks*. - Messages. See your direct Twitter and Facebook conversations in Fuse*. - Personal Interactions. Open the app to be notified of your Facebook and Twitter notifications!

Laicos Headquarter Location

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

Latest Laicos News

AP Explains: Catholic Church in Chile weakened by scandal

Jan 15, 2018

| Miami Herald A member of the movement Laicos de Osorno holds up an image showing the Rev. Fernando Karadima, with a message that reads in Spanish: "A bishop who covers up cannot be a priest," during a demonstration in front of the Apostolic Nunciature in Santiago, Chile, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. Chile’s church has yet to recover its credibility following the scandal over Karadima, Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest. The Vatican in 2011 sentenced Karadima to a lifetime of “penance and prayer” after confirming what his victims had been saying for years but what Chile’s Catholic leadership refused to believe: that Karadima had sexually abused them. Esteban FelixAP Photo A member of the movement Laicos de Osorno holds up an image showing the Rev. Fernando Karadima, with a message that reads in Spanish: "A bishop who covers up cannot be a priest," during a demonstration in front of the Apostolic Nunciature in Santiago, Chile, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. Chile’s church has yet to recover its credibility following the scandal over Karadima, Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest. The Vatican in 2011 sentenced Karadima to a lifetime of “penance and prayer” after confirming what his victims had been saying for years but what Chile’s Catholic leadership refused to believe: that Karadima had sexually abused them. Esteban FelixAP Photo By PETER PRENGAMAN Associated Press SANTIAGO, Chile When Pope Francis arrives in Chile's capital Monday, he will find a weakened Roman Catholic Church. As in many Latin American countries, the church in Chile has been losing followers to both evangelical faiths and increasing secularism. The shift has been exacerbated by a priest sex abuse scandal, and many Chileans are put off by the church's influence in keeping tight restrictions in social matters like marriage and abortion. Here are some of the contributing factors to the Chilean church's problems. ___ SEX ABUSE SCANDALS Always well dressed, the Rev. Fernando Karadima seemed an ideal priest among the elite in Santiago. But he had a dark side, sexually abusing dozens of minors over decades while church superiors either looked the other way or covered up for him. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. Allegations against Karadima went back to the 1980s, but the full weight of his actions didn't become widely known until victims went public in 2010. In 2011, the Vatican found him guilty of sexually abusing minors. The statute of limitations had passed for him to be tried criminally, though, and Karadima's only punishment was being sent by the church to a convent to spend the rest of his life in prayer, angering many Chileans. He is there to this day. ___ POPE'S CONTROVERSIAL APPOINTMENT In 2015, Pope Francis set off an uproar by appointing the Rev. Juan Barros as bishop in the southern city of Osorno. Barros had been a protege of Karadima, working with him for years when the abuses were taking place. Barros has always denied that he knew what Karadima was doing, but many parishioners in Osorno objected to his appointment. When protests erupted, Francis dug in. At one point, the pope said that the "people of Osorno are suffering because of stupidity" and that there was no proof of wrongdoing by Barros. Yet Francis was well aware that Barros' appointment would cause strife. In a 2015 letter obtained by The Associated Press last week, Francis contemplated sending Barros and two other Karadima-trained bishops on yearlong sabbaticals, a decision he didn't ultimately take. ___ BISHOPS THEN AND NOW During Gen. Augusto Pinochet's 1973-1990 dictatorship, thousands of people were killed or disappeared, and any dissent was swiftly crushed. During this period, several Chilean bishops courageously advocated for human rights and represented a check on the dictatorship's worst instincts. The church also helped Chile's poorest amid the government's push to liberalize the economy and worked closely with indigenous communities like the Mapuche. Today, Chilean bishops don't have the same visibility, much less moral authority. Many Chileans believe the Catholic hierarchy is more aligned with business interests than the poor and downtrodden. ___ DIVORCE In Chile, divorce was essentially illegal until 2004, when the Andean nation ended some of the world's strictest marriage laws. The church for decades was able to wield enormous influence on politicians to keep the status quo that went back to the 19th century. People wanting to get legally separated had to get an annulment, an arduous process that required the separating parties to show that somehow the legal requirements of the marriage had not been met. The church argued that restricting divorce kept families together, but that often backfired: Many young people put off marriage for years or indefinitely, while married people who had separated would frequently have children out of wedlock with new partners since they could not divorce and remarry. As a result, many Chileans turned against the faith. ___ ABORTION Chile has some of the world's most restrictive reproductive laws, even after a reform passed last year. Abortion is legal only in three circumstances: when a woman's life is endangered, when a pregnancy results from rape, and when a fetus is not viable. For many Chileans, particularly the younger generations, Catholic leaders' opposition to abortion rights is another example of how church teachings don't jibe with their views. The tight restrictions also underscore deep inequalities: Chilean women with the means have abortions done illegally at private clinics or travel abroad, while poor women either must keep the baby or use riskier methods. Drone footage shows plane dangled over cliff edge in northern Turkey A commercial airplane that skidded off a runway after landing in northern Turkey dangled precariously off a muddy cliff with its nose only a few feet from the sea. The incident late Saturday created panic among the 162 passengers and crew on board the Pegasus Airlines flight, but they were all evacuated safely. Trabzon Gov. Yucel Yavuz said Sunday that investigators were trying to determine why the plane had left the runway. 10 hours ago

Laicos Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
CBI Logo

Laicos Rank

Discover the right solution for your team

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on vendors, products, partnerships, and patents to help your team find their next technology solution.

Request a demo

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.