Predict your next investment

COMPUTER HARDWARE & SERVICES | Computer Storage & Peripherals / Printing & Imaging Equipment
inotec.eu

See what CB Insights has to offer

Founded Year

1988

Stage

Acquired | Acquired

About Inotec

Inotec develops desktop production scanners.

Inotec Headquarter Location

Biedrichstraße 11

Wolfersheim, 61200,

Germany

+49 6036 9708 0

Latest Inotec News

Handtmann Group of Companies Acquires INOTEC

Jan 9, 2020

Handtmann Group of Companies Acquires INOTEC INOTEC Group is a manufacturer of mixing and emulsifying technologies for the food processing sector. The Handtmann Group of Companies, headquartered in Biberach, Germany, has acquired the INOTEC Group, a manufacturer of mixing and emulsifying technologies for the food processing sector, to continue building the international sales and service capabilities of its Maschinenfabrik division that serves the global food processing industry. Handtmann, Inc and Handtmann Canada Limited, the Handtmann Group’s wholly owned sales and service subsidiaries in North America, have been INOTEC’s exclusive sales and service representatives in their respective countries for the full range of their INOTEC products since 2017. “We thus offer our shared customers significant added value. And at the same time, the international sales and service organizations of both companies will be strengthened. Moreover, we have identified synergies for the development of additional fields of application outside the meat processing industry. Both business units, and above all our customers, will benefit from it,” said Company Director Thomas Handtmann. “Our aftermarket service capabilities have been very helpful to existing INOTEC customers while our Handtmann customers have realized great value from the complementary products that also focus on quality, innovation and our service culture,” said Tom Kittle, president of Handtmann, Inc. and Handtmann Canada Limited Patrick McGady, national sales manager for Handtmann, Inc., said “We appreciate the support this acquisition provides for our long term development because our North American food processing sector is changing at breakneck speed and our customers always want trusted relationships with turnkey solutions they can depend on for today’s performance requirements needs and tomorrow’s demands.” “Our North American alliance with INOTEC has provided real benefit for our Canadian customers and I look forward to the added value and very positive prospects of growth it can provide to our customers and for us,” said Handtmann Canada Limited’s Business Development & Sales Manager Graham Dalziel. Professionals needing to create and implement an environmental monitoring program (EMP) can learn to do so with ease through a  new online course  offered by North Carolina State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences has launched a new online certification course designed to help dairy processors develop EMPs — however, the concepts taught in this course can be applied to any field and to anyone in the food manufacturing and processing industry. The course was funded by the North Carolina Dairy Foundation to better assist the state’s dairy industry to get ahead and resolve issues prior to federal investigations. In 2017, FDA linked a Listeria outbreak to a creamery in New York. The company recalled all of its soft, wash-rind raw milk cheeses and FDA conducted an investigation of the creamery after the multi-state outbreak caused eight people to get sick, two of whom later died as a result of the illness. In sampling, FDA found more than 50 positive results of Listeria monocytogenes, 10 of which were on food contact surfaces. Essentially, the agency determined that the company was not using effective cleaning and sanitizing practices — having an EMP could have prevented the outbreak and recall. For many facilities producing products that are exposed to the environment between processing and packaging steps, FDA is requiring that an EMP be in place to make sure that their cleaning and sanitation practices are being performed correctly and effectively. Having an EMP in place helps ensure that products are safe, and it could potentially help prevent costly recalls for businesses. Experts call it a “seek and destroy” program for food safety. In other words, it is a systematic approach to finding niches in food processing where environmental pathogens exist so that you can then reduce the effects of their presence. The online course , which takes about eight hours, is self-paced with each lesson taking between 25 to 40 minutes. It is available to anyone in the food manufacturing industry and can be taken as many times as needed to receive the certification. The final lesson is a case study for which students have to figure out the case of the hidden Listeria. The process of creating and implementing an EMP takes time, but it is achievable. The course, taught by Graduate Teaching Assistant Stephanie Maggio and Associate Professor Clint Stevenson, uses adaptive learning and includes different interactive learning activities to make it relatable for dairy processors. Maggio designed and implemented Howling Cow’s EMP. When she joined the team, they had a basic food safety plan in place and needed to add an EMP program to comply with new FDA requirements. “I went around and looked for the most appropriate sites to sample based on where Listeria monocytogenes would likely hide in the facility,” Maggio said. “I’m looking at difficult-to-clean places that get wet and might stay wet for a long time.” After developing the plan and identifying sample sites, Maggio wrote the sampling schedule of frequency, number, and surface location of samples to collect. Then she implemented her work, collecting 15 samples every two weeks and sending them to a lab for analysis. Because Howling Cow doesn’t run every day, Maggio said larger processors who run every day, all day, should collect more samples, more frequently. North Carolina residents can take the course for free by emailing Maggio at samaggio@ncsu.edu  to attain the code. Those outside the state can save 75% off the course fee with the discount code EMP75. According to new research conducted by market research firm Dynata, on behalf of plant-based meat company  Meatless Farm , 56% of Americans ages 18-65+ would consider reducing meat intake by one meal a week, while up to 24% of Americans are unlikely to eat any meals without meat. Highlights from the report include More Americans aged 25-34 are likely to reduce meat intake (68%) than are those willing to rule out meat-free meals completely (22%). Between 13% and 24% of Americans never eat a meal without meat. During the process of determining likeliness to eat less meat, Meatless Farm discovered that 11% of Americans would be very unlikely to eat even one meal a week that doesn’t contain meat and 13% of Americans would not be likely at all. Nearly 60% of Midwest respondents—and more than half of respondents in all other regions—are likely to consider reducing meat intake. The age groups most likely to consider reducing meat intake were also more likely to make New Year’s resolutions. For example, 70% of respondents ages 18-24 are likely to reduce meat intake, while only 5% claimed they do not make New Year’s resolutions. Meanwhile, the age groups that are least likely to reduce meat intake are also the least likely to make New Year’s resolutions. The report suggests this as being a relationship between self-improvement and eating less meat. Nearly 60% of Americans claimed that personal health was most likely to influence their decision. Other options included animal welfare (13.7%), weight loss (13.7%), the environment (12.2%) and “other” (3.5%). The research is based on responses from 1,050 adults across six age groups and all 50 states For the full report, visit  Americans’ Shifting Attitudes Toward Meat  (Part 2 of 3). Purdue University is hosting the Big Data, Safe Food Conference on May 11-12, 2020. The first of its kind, the two-day conference will explore the intersection of big data and food safety through conversations with experts from industry, government, and academia. On the first day, speakers will address questions about big data and how big data can influence food safety. Andrew Kennedy of the Office of Food Policy and Response at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, will deliver a keynote speech. Sessions will focus on foodborne pathogen contamination, data science applications specific to the food industry, traceability of food products and translation of big data to consumer impacts. The day will conclude with a student poster session. “The main question the conference will focus on is how can academia, industry and government entities collaborate to address and prevent foodborne diseases using data collected from farm to fork. Food has a long and complex supply chain and we need to discuss how big data can influence food safety along with who manages and shares these data points,” said Ariana Torres, assistant professor in the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture and the Department of Agricultural Economics and one of the conference organizers. “Improved data flow, coupled with data analytics and artificial intelligence, has tremendous potential to improve food safety. We hope this conference helps attendees identify technologies and approaches in sensing and control that could nicely complement blockchain and traceability for both marketing and safety,” said Dennis Buckmaster, professor in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Dean’s Fellow for Digital Agriculture. The second day will feature opportunities for networking and grant proposal discussions. The goal is to draft a plan of action by the end of the conference that will combine scholarship, research and possible industry opportunities in the areas of food safety and big data. Conference speakers include: Trevor Suslow, Produce Marketing Association, University of California, Davis. Greg Siragusa, senior principal scientist, Eurofins Microbiology Laboratories. Tejas Bhatt, Senior Director of Food Safety Innovation, Walmart. Mitzi Baum, CEO, Stop Foodborne Illness. Other experts from several universities and firms will cover engineering, food science, animal science, public health, and economics. “Big data concept has been used in improving food quality and developing new food products. We want to explore more ways to utilize data science tools to protect consumers from foodborne illness, for example, using crowdsourcing data to build rapid-response monitoring programs for sporadic outbreaks,” said Yaohua Feng, assistant professor of consumer food safety in Purdue's Department of Food Science. Sponsorship opportunities are available at  https://ag.purdue.edu/big-data-food-safety-2020/sponsors/ . Registration for the conference opens in February. Abstract submissions are currently being accepted at the conference website. More information regarding the conference can be found at https://ag.purdue.edu/big-data-food-safety-2020/ . The edible insects market of the Asia Pacific is estimated to exceed $270 million by 2024 according to a new report from the Graphical Research . Growing concern toward various health issues and a shift in consumption patterns for protein-rich diets may be driving the  growth as the product offers various health benefits, including reducing obesity, and are healthy even to animal when offered as fodder. Following are some key statistics from the report: Asia Pacific edible insects market demand from caterpillars is likely to register over 44% by 2024. They are easily garnered and are rich source of vitamins, minerals, and proteins. Mopane caterpillar advances in iron deficiency in diet and contains protein which may foster the market demand. These bugs feed on tree leaves and their influence on forest ecosystem are the driving factors accelerating the industry demand. Flour application may surpass $85 million by 2024. Crickets and mealworms are primarily used in bakery products such as biscuits, muffins and desserts, due to their gluten-free properties which fuels product demand. China edible insects market size may witness significant gains at over 44% by the end of forecast timeframe. Bugs are mainly consumed in this region for eating and medical purposes. Honey bee drones are used as traditional medicine. Beetles have anti-diuretic effect are considered as healthy which in turn drives the overall market. Thailand bug market demand may surpass $50 million by 2024. It has over 20,000 insect farming business, most of which are limited household operations, and over 200 species are consumed. Insect farming has emerged as a substantial economic activity in the region owing to strong and favorable market demand. Asia Pacific edible insects market share is fragmented with key players including HaoCheng Mealworms, Thailand Unique, Bugsolutely, Ecobars, and Entotech. Companies are investing in R&D to expand their product demand.

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

Inotec Patents

Inotec has filed 4 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Sausages
  • Smoked meat
  • Bend knots
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

6/22/2018

4/13/2021

Smoked meat, Control engineering, Sausages, Protein domains, Cybernetics

Grant

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Application Date

6/22/2018

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Grant Date

4/13/2021

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Title

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Related Topics

Smoked meat, Control engineering, Sausages, Protein domains, Cybernetics

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Status

Grant

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

CB Insights uses Cookies

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.