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FOREVER

forever.com

Stage

Loan | Alive

Total Raised

$18.95M

Last Raised

$680K | 3 yrs ago

About FOREVER

FOREVER is a Permanent Social Storage company. The company offers Permanent Social Storage, media conversion services, documentary video production, and unique subdomains that provide individuals with their permanent addresses on the internet. FOREVER's belief is that every life matters and that every person's life should be honored and remembered.

Headquarters Location

One PPG Place 20th Floor

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15222,

United States

412-904-6330

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FOREVER Patents

FOREVER has filed 121 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Cell biology
  • Cuttlefish
  • Graphical projections
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

2/18/2016

1/24/2023

Web frameworks, Aquaculture, Cloud computing, Mettawee-class gasoline tankers, Web applications

Grant

Application Date

2/18/2016

Grant Date

1/24/2023

Title

Related Topics

Web frameworks, Aquaculture, Cloud computing, Mettawee-class gasoline tankers, Web applications

Status

Grant

Latest FOREVER News

Community Voices: The day America changed forever

Dec 7, 2022

BY DARLENE VANGEL Dec. 7, 1941, the day 81 years ago Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Honolulu, Hawaii. I am probably among the few still living who remembers the events of this unforgettable day and wish to share my memories as experienced as a 9-year-old child living in Hollywood, 7 miles from the Pacific Ocean. My first writings of my World War II experiences published locally two years ago extended nationwide with the help of social media, receiving more than 1,600 likes and favorable comments. History teachers reported sharing with their students who listened intently with earnest and eagerness to hear more. It was a late Sunday afternoon. My parents and us five kids were enjoying a drive to Santa Monica beach, continuing on up the Pacific coastline. Suddenly, an ALERT came blasting through the car radio announcing America was at war. Pearl Harbor was in the midst of a bombing attack by the Japanese Air Squadron. INSTRUCTIONS: “The Los Angeles Pacific Coast should prepare for an attack. “If you are driving, return home immediately. DO NOT turn on your car headlights. All of those at home, DO NOT turn on your household lights.” The following day, instructions were issued to cover all windows with blackout material at night. Nighttime driving was only allowed in an emergency. Night driving curfews were strictly enforced. Air raid warden volunteers were organized and issued hard hat helmets to patrol assigned neighborhoods at night to ensure all blackout requirements were followed. We experienced frequent air raid drills day and night. While at school during the drills, as per instructed, we hid under our desks until the all-clear signal. Classroom windows were fitted with blackout window shades. Neighborhoods held scrap drives, collecting any kind of metal, paper, newspapers and rubber tires. Other volunteers went house to house collecting our kitchen pots and pans to be melted for use in building battleships, aircraft, military vehicles and weaponry. Auto dealers no longer had new cars for sale. All metal and most commodities went toward the war effort. It became common for individuals to trade cars among themselves. Often my father would arrive home from work in a different car than what he left in. (A 1940s new Ford was $800 if you could find one.) Many people no longer continued with their regular course of employment and began seeking jobs to contribute to the war effort building battleships and aircraft. My father, a grocery store butcher, built battleships in San Pedro Harbor while learning welding on the job. My stepmother became one of the hundreds of Rosie the Riveters, building airplanes at Lockheed. The necessity for women to wear pants while climbing around inside aircraft fuselage brought about change in women’s fashion of wearing pants. Long hair was secured into a crocheted Snude, soon to be seen as a high fashion accessory. Clothing and fabric was in short supply, needed for military uniforms. Our silk fabric imports from Japanese silkworm farms were ceased, depleting much of women’s silk lingerie and silk stockings. Women painted their legs with leg make-up, drawing the fashionable seam down the back of their legs with an eyebrow pencil. Nylon became a substitute for silk, bringing nylon fabric manufacturing to full force as needed for parachutes. Nylon is now the most prevalent fiber in numerous products used today. This war changed women’s fashions forever. Soon families were issued rationing stamps upon the head of household registering at local schools. Rationing stamps were needed to purchase allowances of gasoline, sugar, butter, meat, canned goods and certain types of clothing. These commodities were in short supply due to increases in military personnel and consumption. Many substitutes were used. That is how margarine (Oleo) came to be on our kitchen tables. Oleo consisted of a 1-pound block of white mystery substance, along with an envelope of orange powder to be stirred into it (my job). It looked like butter, but did not taste like butter. Rationing of these commodities continued in effect until 1943-44. Training classes were held to teach housewives to shop and cook with what few ­groceries were available. Classes were offered to educate and encourage growing vegetables in backyards. ­Victory gardens were common. It was fun growing radishes in my two designated rows. Drafting of our young men into the Army went into affect. All males 18 years of age were drafted. The young man who later became my husband, while an 18-year-old senior at Hollywood High School, was ordered to report to a U.S. Army training camp, later deployed to Adak Isle, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, approximately 5,000 miles from Japan. Sonar detectors reported constant hovering of Japanese submarines offshore. Japanese American families were rounded up and trucked to internment camps. They were forced to leave all possessions, homes and businesses, later to be confiscated by the U.S. government, never to be returned. We wondered where our Japanese friends had gone when they failed to come to school. USO clubs were established as a place to congregate for those granted a furlough, R&R (rest and recuperation). The Hollywood USO opened up just three blocks from where we lived near the famous intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street. Movie stars and comic entertainers volunteered to perform and dance with the young men. Big bands, such as Glenn Miller, Harry James, Les Brown and Jimmy Dorsey, entertained. My 18-year-old sister, along with other local young ladies, helped in dancing and visiting with the young men. I would frequently walk down the boulevard with my sister to the USO. I was too young to enter, but excited to watch the big stars arrive. Later, at home, my sister’s stories of the many young men she had met from all over the country were fascinating. Information hushed by our government was later released on this same day of Dec. 7. Japanese Navy submarines having made their way undetected into U.S. territory waters were sitting offshore awaiting attack orders, “fire the torpedoes,” while only a few miles offshore from the Los Angeles coastline. Catastrophe and devastation was so close. War causes so much grief with the absence of loved ones and loss of life for so many. War has huge changes and effects, so much more than is realized. It is amazing how we were able to carry on, adapt and adjust to changes and new beginnings brought about by the ravages and actions of war. Through it all we did survive. These were frightening times for those of us whose only knowledge of war was by hearing about it on the radio, newspaper or newsreels shown in movie theaters. Television was not yet available. We never had imagined conflict of war ever touching American soil, nor imagined the vast impact war would have on our citizens’ daily lives. On this dark day, U.S. Naval Fleet had eight battleships moored at the harbor. The bombing sunk four ships and severely damaged four others, while taking 2,300 lives. On Sept. 2, 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced the war had come to an end. Sadly, the unimaginable number of 75 million lives were lost during the six years of World War II. Darlene Vangel, 90, is active in community issues and is a 36-year resident of Old Westchester in Bakersfield.

FOREVER Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • Where is FOREVER's headquarters?

    FOREVER's headquarters is located at One PPG Place, Pittsburgh.

  • What is FOREVER's latest funding round?

    FOREVER's latest funding round is Loan.

  • How much did FOREVER raise?

    FOREVER raised a total of $18.95M.

  • Who are the investors of FOREVER?

    Investors of FOREVER include Paycheck Protection Program, Meakem Becker Venture Capital, Great Oaks Venture Capital, JEMS Venture Capital, Clearwater Capital Management and 3 more.

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