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Florida International University

fiu.edu

Founded Year

1965

Stage

Grant - II | Alive

Total Raised

$1.15M

Last Raised

$150K | 2 yrs ago

About Florida International University

Florida International University is a top-tier public research university focused on higher education and innovation. The university offers a wide range of undergraduate and graduate degrees, including highly ranked online programs, and engages in significant research and development activities across various fields. FIU serves a diverse student body and is recognized for its contributions to the public good and its impact on social mobility. It was founded in 1965 and is based in Miami, Florida.

Headquarters Location

11200 SW 8th Street

Miami, Florida, 33199,

United States

305-348-2000

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Florida International University Patents

Florida International University has filed 268 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • antennas (radio)
  • radio frequency antenna types
  • nanomaterials
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

5/19/2023

2/13/2024

Organometallic chemistry, Chemical reactions, Organic reactions, Catalysis, Organic chemistry

Grant

Application Date

5/19/2023

Grant Date

2/13/2024

Title

Related Topics

Organometallic chemistry, Chemical reactions, Organic reactions, Catalysis, Organic chemistry

Status

Grant

Latest Florida International University News

Herbivore effects increase with latitude across the extent of a foundational seagrass

Feb 16, 2024

nature ecology & evolution Abstract Climate change is altering the functioning of foundational ecosystems. While the direct effects of warming are expected to influence individual species, the indirect effects of warming on species interactions remain poorly understood. In marine systems, as tropical herbivores undergo poleward range expansion, they may change food web structure and alter the functioning of key habitats. While this process (‘tropicalization’) has been documented within declining kelp forests, we have a limited understanding of how this process might unfold across other systems. Here we use a network of sites spanning 23° of latitude to explore the effects of increased herbivory (simulated via leaf clipping) on the structure of a foundational marine plant (turtlegrass). By working across its geographic range, we also show how gradients in light, temperature and nutrients modified plant responses. We found that turtlegrass near its northern boundary was increasingly affected (reduced productivity) by herbivory and that this response was driven by latitudinal gradients in light (low insolation at high latitudes). By contrast, low-latitude meadows tolerated herbivory due to high insolation which enhanced plant carbohydrates. We show that as herbivores undergo range expansion, turtlegrass meadows at their northern limit display reduced resilience and may be under threat of ecological collapse. Access options Get Nature+, our best-value online-access subscription $29.99 / 30 days $119.00 per year Prices vary by article type from$1.95 Additional access options: Fig. 2: Grazing effects on seagrass productivity across latitude and light gradients. Fig. 3: Standardized coefficients from the ‘latitude’ model of seagrass productivity. Fig. 4: Grazing effects on rhizome non-structural carbohydrates. Fig. 5: Standardized coefficients from the ‘light/temperature’ model of seagrass productivity. Data availability References Harrington, R., Woiwod, I. & Sparks, T. Climate change and trophic interactions. Trends Ecol. Evol. 14, 146–150 (1999). Nowicki, R.J., Fourqurean, J.W., Heithaus, M.R. in Seagrasses of Australia (eds Larkum, A., Kendrick, G. & Ralph, P.) Ch. 16 (Springer, 2018). Valentine, J. F. & Heck, K. L. Herbivory in seagrass meadows: an evolving paradigm. Estuaries Coasts 44, 491–505 (2021). Heck, K. L., Fodrie, F. J., Madsen, S., Baillie, C. J. & Byron, D. A. Seagrass consumption by native and a tropically associated fish species: potential impacts of the tropicalization of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 520, 165–173 (2015). Fourqurean, J. W., Manuel, S., Coates, K. A., Kenworthy, W. J. & Smith, S. R. Effects of excluding sea turtle herbivores from a seagrass bed: overgrazing may have led to loss of seagrass meadows in Bermuda. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 419, 63–75 (2010). Manuel, S. A., Coates, K. A., Kenworthy, W. J. & Fourqurean, J. W. Tropical species at the northern limit of their range: composition and distribution in Bermuda’s benthic habitats in relation to depth and light availability. Mar. Environ. Res. 89, 63–75 (2013). Fourqurean, J. W., Manuel, S. A., Coates, K. A., Massey, S. C. & Kenworthy, W. J. Decadal monitoring in Bermuda shows a widespread loss of seagrasses attributable to overgrazing by the green sea turtle Chelonia mydas. Estuaries Coasts 42, 1524–1540 (2019). Smith D. Removing and Analyzing Total Nonstructural Carbohydrates from Plant Tissue. Res. Rep. 41 (University of Wisconsin, 1969). Atkinson, M. J. & Smith, S. V. C:N:P rations of benthic marine plants. Limnol. Oceanogr. 28, 568–574 (1983). Pinheiro J., Bates D. & R Core Team. nlme: linear and nonlinear mixed effects models. R package version 3.1-162, R-project https://cran.r-project.org/package=nlme (2023). Mevik B. H., Wehrens R. & Liland K. H. pls: partial least squares and principal component regression. R package version 2.7.0 https://cran.r-project.org/src/contrib/Archive/pls/pls_2.7-0.tar.gz (2020). Wood, S. N. Fast stable restricted maximum likelihood and marginal likelihood estimation of semiparametric generalized linear models. J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B 73, 3–36 (2011). Acknowledgements We are greatly indebted to the many staff, students and volunteers who helped with fieldwork and processing in the lab. We thank those at the Smithsonian Marine Station: S. Jones, Z. Foltz, S. Carlson, I. Segura-Garcia, M. Johnson, A. Looby, O. Carmack and D. Branson. We also thank L Spiers, J. Kuehl and J. Clamp at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute (CCMI) in Little Cayman; A. E. MacDonald at the Galveston site; K. Coates at the Bermuda site; A. John, A. Safryghin, J. Reinhart, K. Malinowski, L. Woodlee, M. Speegle, M, England, S. Glew, T. Leon and N. Knight at the Andros, Bahamas site; S. Engel and J. van Duijnhoven at the Bonaire site; S. Alford, T. Gruninger, A. Looby (again), C. Sullivan, S. Downey, P. Saldana, W. Scheffel, J. Roth and T. Jones at the Crystal River site; T. Gluckman, C. Raguse, I. Primrose Hartman, W. F. Bigelow and M. Albury at the Eleuthera, Bahamas site; and M. Guadalupe Barba Santos at the Puerto Morelos site. We also thank M. Sarsich and the Blue Carbon Analysis Laboratory at Florida International University for assistance with the nutrient analyses. Special thanks to E. Duffy, the Smithsonian MarineGEO program and the Zostera Experimental Network for key insights and inspiration behind this network. This work was conducted under the following permits: at Eleuthera under permit numbers MAMR/FIS/17 and MAMR/FIS/9 issued by the Department of Marine Resources; at Bonaire under permit number 558/2015‐2015007762 issued by Openbaar Lichaam Bonaire; at Belize under permit number 0004-18 issued by the Belize Fisheries Department; at Panama under permit numbers SE/AP-23-17 and SE/AO-1-19 issued by the Ministerio de Ambiente de la Republica de Panama; at Andros by permits issued by The Bahamas National Trust and the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission; and at Cayman Islands by a permit issued by the Department of Environment. This is contribution #1679 from the Coastlines and Oceans Division of the Institute of Environment at Florida International University, contribution #1213 from the Smithsonian Marine Station and contribution #1077 from the Caribbean Coral Reef Ecosystems Program. Funding for this project was provided by the US National Science Foundation (OCE-1737247 to J.E.C., A.H.A. and VJP; OCE-2019022 to J.E.C. ; OCE-1737144 to K.L.H. ; and OCE-1737116 to J.G.D.). M.J.A.C. was supported by I-Veni grant 181.002. Author information Authors and Affiliations Institute of Environment, Coastlines and Oceans Division, and Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA Justin E. Campbell, O. Kennedy Rhoades, Calvin J. Munson, James W. Fourqurean, Janelle A. Goeke, Rancel Grana-Valdes, Clare Peabody & William L. Wied Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, FL, USA Justin E. Campbell, O. Kennedy Rhoades, Valerie J. Paul, Enrique Bethel, Grace Dodillet, Katrina Dutton, Bethany M. Gaffey, Rachael Glazner, Janelle A. Goeke, Victoria J. Jenkins, Olivier A. A. Kramer, Isis G. Martinez Lopez, Vivienne A. Main, Duncan A. O’Brien, Amanda Sang, Khalil Smith, Uriah Sun, Jamie E. Thompson & William L. Wied Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada O. Kennedy Rhoades Calvin J. Munson Andrew H. Altieri Andrew H. Altieri James G. Douglass & Amanda Sang Dauphin Island Sea Lab and University of South Alabama, Dauphin Island, AL, USA Kenneth L. Heck, Samantha T. Linhardt, Charles W. Martin, Candela Marco-Méndez & Alex Rodriguez Department of Marine Biology, Texas A&M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USA Anna R. Armitage, Rachael Glazner, Janelle A. Goeke & Jamie E. Thompson UF|IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, University of Florida, Cedar Key, FL, USA Savanna C. Barry & Ashley M. McDonald The Centre for Ocean Research and Education (CORE), Gregory Town, Bahamas Enrique Bethel, Duncan A. O’Brien & Owen R. O’Shea International Field Studies, Inc., Forfar Field Station, Blanket Sound, Bahamas Lindsey Christ Marjolijn J. A. Christianen & Fee O. H. Smulders CSA Ocean Sciences Inc., Stuart, FL, USA Grace Dodillet Thomas K. Frazer Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, School of Forest, Fisheries, and Geomatics Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Bethany M. Gaffey Victoria J. Jenkins Isis G. Martinez Lopez & Brigitta van Tussenbroek Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Ashley M. McDonald & Laura K. Reynolds Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Vivienne A. Main Sarah A. Manuel & Khalil Smith CEAB (CSIC), Girona, Spain Candela Marco-Méndez Christopher J. Patrick Lucia M. Rodriguez Bravo Yvonne Sawall O. Kennedy Rhoades Calvin J. Munson Andrew H. Altieri James G. Douglass Kenneth L. Heck Valerie J. Paul Anna R. Armitage Savanna C. Barry Enrique Bethel Lindsey Christ Marjolijn J. A. Christianen Grace Dodillet Katrina Dutton James W. Fourqurean Thomas K. Frazer Bethany M. Gaffey Rachael Glazner Janelle A. Goeke Rancel Grana-Valdes Victoria J. Jenkins Olivier A. A. Kramer Samantha T. Linhardt Charles W. Martin Isis G. Martinez Lopez Ashley M. McDonald Vivienne A. Main Sarah A. Manuel Candela Marco-Méndez Duncan A. O’Brien Owen R. O’Shea Christopher J. Patrick Clare Peabody Laura K. Reynolds Alex Rodriguez Lucia M. Rodriguez Bravo Amanda Sang Yvonne Sawall Khalil Smith Fee O. H. Smulders Uriah Sun Jamie E. Thompson Brigitta van Tussenbroek William L. Wied

Florida International University Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • When was Florida International University founded?

    Florida International University was founded in 1965.

  • Where is Florida International University's headquarters?

    Florida International University's headquarters is located at 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami.

  • What is Florida International University's latest funding round?

    Florida International University's latest funding round is Grant - II.

  • How much did Florida International University raise?

    Florida International University raised a total of $1.15M.

  • Who are the investors of Florida International University?

    Investors of Florida International University include J.P. Morgan Chase and Bank of America.

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