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eGenesis company logo
Corporation
HEALTHCARE | Biotechnology
egenesisbio.com

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Founded Year

2015

Stage

Series C | Alive

Total Raised

$265M

Last Raised

$125M | 1 yr ago

About eGenesis

eGenesis aims to make available safe and reliable xeno organs, tissues, and cells to patients in need and advance the field of transplantation. eGenesis uses gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to directly address the key virology and immunology hurdles that have impeded xenotransplantation to date. eGenesis is advancing an initial product toward the clinic for kidney transplant, with the longer-term potential of addressing a broader organ recipient population and expanding the applicability of xenotransplantation into other areas such as cell therapy.

eGenesis Headquarter Location

300 Technology Square Suite 301

Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139,

United States

617-939-3643

Latest eGenesis News

In historic first, surgeons transplant a genetically modified pig heart into a dying patient

Jan 11, 2022

Jason Mast Editor Two and a half months af­ter an NYU team du­bi­ous­ly  claimed to have per­formed the first ever pig-to-hu­man or­gan trans­plant, a team at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Mary­land Med­ical Cen­ter ap­pears to have ac­tu­al­ly done it. The cen­ter an­nounced Mon­day evening that sur­geons there suc­cess­ful­ly trans­plant­ed a ge­net­i­cal­ly mod­i­fied pig heart in­to a 57-year-old pa­tient with ter­mi­nal heart dis­ease. The pa­tient, David Ben­nett, was too sick to qual­i­fy for a hu­man donor and had run out of oth­er op­tions. In the decades-long ef­fort to make xeno­trans­plan­ta­tion a re­al­i­ty, the new re­port dif­fered from Oc­to­ber’s in key re­spects. Most glar­ing­ly, the pa­tient at NYU was al­ready brain-dead. Doc­tors su­tured a porcine kid­ney to the out­side of her body and could on­ly track whether the pa­tient im­me­di­ate­ly re­ject­ed the for­eign or­gan. As pre­dict­ed by years of mon­key ex­per­i­ments, she didn’t. Ben­nett, with the doc­tor who per­formed the surgery, Bart­ley Grif­fith The new pro­ce­dure may of­fer the first test of whether porcine or­gans, when bred with the right bat­tery of ge­net­ic ed­its, can ac­tu­al­ly serve as a re­place­ment or sup­ple­ment to hu­man or­gan do­na­tion and al­low pa­tients to live func­tion­al lives. So far, so good, ac­cord­ing to UMD, al­though doc­tors cau­tioned that it’s still ear­ly. Ben­nett is do­ing well three days af­ter the pro­ce­dure, the cen­ter said. The New York Times  re­port­ed he was still on a heart-lung by­pass ma­chine, but that is com­mon for any new heart trans­plant re­cip­i­ent. “It was ei­ther die or do this trans­plant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Ben­nett said, in a state­ment pro­vid­ed by UMD. “I look for­ward to get­ting out of bed af­ter I re­cov­er.” The news comes as xeno­trans­plan­ta­tion, af­ter years on the med­ical mar­gin, ap­peared to be inch­ing clos­er to re­al­i­ty, po­ten­tial­ly of­fer­ing an al­ter­na­tive to the hun­dreds of thou­sands of pa­tients in the US and around the world wait­ing for or­gans. Af­ter a high-pro­file at­tempt to trans­plant a ba­boon heart in­to a ba­by with a con­gen­i­tal heart de­fect failed in 1983, re­searchers and sev­er­al com­pa­nies tried to use re­com­bi­nant DNA tech­niques to make pigs with or­gans that hu­mans can ac­cept. Those ef­forts dis­in­te­grat­ed vir­tu­al­ly overnight af­ter the dis­cov­ery of a retro­virus com­mon to pigs, ter­ri­fy­ing health of­fi­cials then deal­ing with the height of the US’s HIV cri­sis. But in the last decade, as fur­ther re­search low­ered con­cerns that porcine en­doge­nous retro­virus, or PERV as the retro­virus is known, can trans­mit to hu­mans and as new genome-en­gi­neer­ing tools be­came avail­able, the field has re­vived it­self. Ben­nett’s new heart came from Re­vivi­cor, a sub­sidiary of the $9 bil­lion rare dis­ease biotech Unit­ed Ther­a­peu­tics. It’s the same com­pa­ny that pro­vid­ed the NYU heart, but Ben­nett’s heart came from pigs with far more ge­net­ic ed­its: 10 in to­tal — four pig genes knocked out to pre­vent re­jec­tion, six hu­man genes knocked in to pro­mote tol­er­ance, and one ad­di­tion­al pig gene knocked out to pre­vent ex­ces­sive tis­sue growth. Sci­en­tists are di­vid­ed on the ex­act num­ber of ed­its need­ed to pre­vent. Re­vivi­cor has been com­pet­ing with a cou­ple aca­d­e­m­ic labs and eGe­n­e­sis, the ven­ture cap­i­tal fa­vorite, to make xeno­trans­plan­ta­tion a re­al­i­ty. eGe­n­e­sis, found­ed by ge­net­ic en­gi­neer Luhan Yang and backed with over $260 mil­lion from pri­vate in­vestors, makes an even high­er num­ber of ed­its — they’ve nev­er said quite how many — as they try to elim­i­nate PERV en­tire­ly. To be clear, though, Ben­nett’s surgery is still a re­mark­ably ear­ly step by the stan­dard process of drug de­vel­op­ment. The FDA OK’d the pro­ce­dure un­der com­pas­sion­ate use, an emer­gency mea­sure to make ex­per­i­men­tal ther­a­pies avail­able to pa­tients with no oth­er op­tions. For xeno­trans­plan­ta­tion to ac­tu­al­ly be­come a med­ical­ly ap­proved prod­uct, one com­pa­ny or aca­d­e­m­ic team will have to show the mod­i­fied porcine or­gans are safe and ef­fec­tive in a clin­i­cal tri­al. Re­vivi­cor, eGe­n­e­sis and oth­ers are try­ing to com­plete the mon­key stud­ies nec­es­sary to re­ceive clear­ance for such a tri­al. They will like­ly need to show the non-hu­man pri­mates have con­sis­tent sur­vival af­ter trans­plant. Ex­perts sug­gest one could be­gin in 2023. AUTHOR Kyle Blankenship Managing Editor Awash in cash from its Covid-19 vaccine and leaner than ever, Pfizer has pick of the litter in biotech for deals set to shape its portfolio for the next 10 to 15 years. Gene editing has a ton of momentum right now, and Pfizer is biting in a big way on a buzzy upstart working on “CRISPR 2.0.” Pfizer will pay $300 million upfront and up to $1.05 billion in additional downstream milestones to Beam Therapeutics as part of a four-year research collaboration to develop base editors for a trio of therapeutic targets including the liver, CNS and muscle, the partners said Monday. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Beth Snyder Bulik Senior Editor Third-place is unfamiliar territory for AbbVie’s blockbuster drug Humira – even when it comes to TV ad spending. But that’s where the drug ended up in 2021 after AbbVie switched up Humira’s typically top-spend budget and reallocated some of its spending to newer sibling brands Rinvoq and Skyrizi. The new No. 1 this year is Dupixent, Sanofi and Regeneron’s treatment approved in indications like asthma and eczema, according to data from realtime TV ad tracker iSpot.tv. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Amber Tong Senior Editor When Sarepta revealed last January that its gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy had failed the key functional endpoint in Part 1 of a Phase II trial, executives underscored that there’s a second part to the study — giving them another shot at a favorable readout. One year later, Sarepta is taking the virtual podium at JP Morgan to present what they call positive results. But reactions are decidedly mixed, and investors sent shares $SRPT tumbling 10.94% to $76.15. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Paul Schloesser Associate Editor Every year, the analysts over at Clarivate issue their predictions for which drugs will hit blockbuster status. Now in its 9th year, they’ve got some drugs — either pending an FDA approval or just won approval , in the case of the asthma treatment tezepelumab — that they think will become blockbusters (i.e. hit $1 billion in annual revenue) in the next five years. By the end of 2026, the analysts are expecting about $16 billion in sales from the top 7 drugs, and the top 2 candidates — both from Eli Lilly — are predicted to have an out-sized bite. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Beth Snyder Bulik Senior Editor From biowearables to smart at-home health care and monitoring, health technology took centerstage at CES last week. Literally, in fact, with Abbott presenting the first-ever healthcare keynote at the annual seminal tech fest. Abbott, which makes FreeStyle Libre blood glucose monitors, took the spotlight opportunity to announce its move into consumer biowearables. Its newly unveiled line of Lingo products will track and measure not only glucose, but also lactate and ketones and eventually alcohol levels. Building on its glucose tech, the future products center on a similar circular wearable patch that constantly monitors metabolic blood markers and reports results through a smartphone app. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Kyle Blankenship Managing Editor Last to the game in the current generation of CAR-T cell therapies, Bristol Myers Squibb has wasted no time trying to challenge its closest rivals’ head start while keeping an eye to the future. On the latter front, the drug giant has now signed a deal with a small next-gen cell therapy player to get a leg up. Bristol Myers will pay $100 million in upfront cash and make an additional $50 million equity investment in Century Therapeutics for access to up to four off-the-shelf engineered cell therapies derived from donor stem cells, the partners said Monday. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Amber Tong Senior Editor Bristol Myers Squibb has loaded up plenty of ammunition for M&A and other types of deals over the next two years — even if the right targets aren’t always easy to come by. Presenting at the virtual JP Morgan Healthcare Conference, the pharma giant revealed that it expects to have around $45 billion to $50 billion in free cash flow between 2022 and 2024, which it plans to spend on a “balanced capital allocation strategy, prioritizing business development and returning cash to shareholders” through dividend and share repurchase programs. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 128,000+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP LOG IN

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Research containing eGenesis

Get data-driven expert analysis from the CB Insights Intelligence Unit.

CB Insights Intelligence Analysts have mentioned eGenesis in 1 CB Insights research brief, most recently on Aug 31, 2021.

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Aug 31, 2021

What Is CRISPR?

Expert Collections containing eGenesis

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

eGenesis is included in 5 Expert Collections, including Synthetic Biology.

S

Synthetic Biology

238 items

Companies involved in design and development of new biological parts, devices, and systems; as well as the re-design of existing biological systems.

G

Game Changers 2018

70 items

R

Regenerative Medicine

1,767 items

Regenerative medicine refers to the process of activating, replacing, engineering or regenerating human genetic material, cells, tissues or organs to restore normal function. It also includes bioengineered tissues used for in vitro testing (e.g. organ-on-a-chip, organoids).

B

Biopharma Tech

5,238 items

Companies involved in the research, development, and commercialization of chemically- or biologically-derived therapeutic & theranostic drugs. Excludes vitamins/supplements, CROs/clinical trial services.

D

Diabetes

1,750 items

eGenesis Patents

eGenesis has filed 1 patent.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Medical ethics
  • Molecular biology
  • Organ donation
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

4/20/2018

Transplantation medicine, Organ donation, Organ transplantation, Medical ethics, Molecular biology

Application

Application Date

4/20/2018

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Transplantation medicine, Organ donation, Organ transplantation, Medical ethics, Molecular biology

Status

Application

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