Predict your next investment

ELECTRONICS | Chips & Semiconductors
cpac.pro

See what CB Insights has to offer

Stage

Series A - II | Alive

Total Raised

$8.65M

Valuation

$0000 

Last Raised

$2M | 8 yrs ago

About Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC) is partnering with TomoTherapy Incorporated and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to create compact proton therapy for cancer treatment. The key component of the technology is a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) that was developed through research conducted at the LLNL. The DWA will allow CPAC to produce an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) machine that can be used in a standard therapy treatment room. While particle therapy has been shown to be a form of cancer treatment, cost has traditionally been a barrier. Per the company, the proposed CPAC system will carry a lower initial cost, allowing CPAC the opportunity to make IMPT available to a broader range of hospitals and cancer centers. In addition to cancer treatment, the technology has the potential to be used in other fields such as defense, security and semiconductors.

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation Headquarter Location

Madison, Wisconsin, 53701,

United States

Latest Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation News

How SafeTraces uses DNA to track food supply chains

Aug 6, 2019

New high-level partnerships will put the technology to the task of tracing troubled supply chains like palm oil and produce. SafeTraces During a 2011 listeria outbreak involving cantaloupe , 33 people died and 137 were sickened. While Anthony Zografos was not one of them, the story caught his eye. And the thing that concerned him the most was the weeks it took to pinpoint the source of contamination. Many consumers may have had those melons in their refrigerators the whole time, ticking time bombs to make the consumers who purchased them deathly ill. "In this day and age, if I can look at my shirt and can tell right away where it's from, you should be able to do this for food, right?" Zografos told Food Dive. "...I found out that no, that's not the case at all. So that's the problem I set out to solve. How can you identify the origin of food pretty much instantly?" Zografos, who has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and previously worked as chief operating officer of tech company Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation, wanted to solve this problem. There are two important reasons to make this information available, he said: food safety and guaranteeing authenticity. Most traceability applications on the market do a good job of keeping track of food packaging. Zografos wanted to create something unique. He founded SafeTraces, which creates DNA-level tracking that is applied directly to food products. "The product information stays with the product itself, whether it's apples, or beans, or grains, or oils, or a caviar," Zografos said. "You name it ... we've done it. So basically, you can pick a grain out of a bag, or you can pick an apple out of a case or you can pick … a single row out of the tin of caviar and you can identify where it was produced, when it was produced." While SafeTraces has been around for a few years, it recently announced high-level partnerships. Last week, the tracking company announced a deal with safety science giant UL to enhance palm oil traceability. This partnership gives businesses dealing with palm oil — a common food ingredient that has a reputation for being farmed using substandard sustainability and human rights practices — a potentially easy solution to guarantee the ingredient's source. Last month, SafeTraces announced a partnership with JBT FoodTech , a leading producer of food processing and packaging equipment. This partnership has not yet been fully defined, SafeTraces Vice President of Business Development Ulrike Hodges told Food Dive, but the companies are looking for a way to pursue food processing while integrating SafeTraces technology. How it works While other methods to trace food focus on barcodes on food packaging, SafeTraces uses something much smaller: DNA. Zografos said the company extracts food-safe DNA markers from seaweed. Those markers can be read like a barcode and applied to the surface of the food. It's received generally recognized as safe status from the FDA and is completely imperceptible, he said. "People are looking to tell this story and, you know, a way to do that is by talking about the origin of the grain and its journey, and ... our solution helps do that." Anthony Zografos Founder and CEO, SafeTraces SafeTraces is used by many different food makers, but mostly fresh produce companies. There's vast demand for this kind of traceability technology — and vast opportunity, he said. The UL partnership to trace palm oil is one of these opportunities. "The human, environmental and financial toll of this problem is enormous," Zografos said in a press release announcing the partnership. "The first-mile, from plantation to mill, is where the risk of deforestation and labor exploitation is greatest and where traceability is weakest. SafeTraces is thrilled to partner with a global leader like UL to securely trace palm oil back to individual plantations in a way that is operationally and financially attractive for our customers." UL, which provides third-party audits and inspections, said in the press release it will use the partnership "to tackle the palm oil sourcing problem on the ground, delivering unprecedented control of and insight into a critically important food supply chain." Authenticity is an important reason to trace food. Adulteration has been a problem with some items, with less expensive versions of items like caviar, oil, honey and fish being mislabeled as their pricier counterparts. With a solution like SafeTraces, the end consumer can be sure an item is what he believes it to be. After all, Zografos said, even if a producer uses blockchain to meticulously track a box of Washington apples, there's no guarantee that someone along the line didn't switch some out for less expensive varieties. Finding that one critical point Food safety is another application of SafeTraces technology. Like the listeria outbreak that first caught Zografos' attention, consumers need to know quickly if they have an item that is contaminated. Blockchain, which Zografos said he considers a tool in the traceability toolbox, is useful. But in order to make it work, it requires buy-in from every link in the supply chain. With the current infrastructure around blockchain, a product can be traced through various points in the supply chain. And while that’s important to manufacturers, retailers and logistics managers, it is much less important to consumers. They want to know a few basic things: Is this product safe? Is it authentic? If the answer to either of those questions is no, they want to know where the issue occurred. "There is usually a single point — a single transformation, if you like — where the product either gains value or acquires risk. From that point on, nothing really happens. It's in a box and it goes from one place to another, and it can go to 20 places before it gets to you." Anthony Zografos Founder and CEO, SafeTraces "The majority of the value or of the risk is introduced at a single point," Zografos said. "It could be the farm, it could be the packing house, it could be the processor. But there is usually a single point — a single transformation, if you like — where the product either gains value or acquires risk. From that point on, nothing really happens. It's in a box and it goes from one place to another, and it can go to 20 places before it gets to you." With SafeTraces, it’s easier to go back to that one place. If items are checked consistently as they travel through the supply chain, it's quite easy to find, Zografos said. As SafeTraces improves its technology and continues to forge partnerships, there is great potential. Zografos said the company is likely to work with agricultural commodities, but opportunities may fuel greater expansion — maybe even into other fields like healthcare and pharmaceuticals. "The possibilities are quite significant," he said. Follow Megan Poinski on Twitter

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

Expert Collections containing Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation is included in 1 Expert Collection, including Cancer.

C

Cancer

3,604 items

Companies researching, developing, or offering products & services that aid in the screening, prevention, diagnosis, management, and treatment of cancer.

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation Patents

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation has filed 6 patents.

patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

12/8/2010

7/8/2014

Capacitors, Microwave technology, Electromagnetism, Dielectrics, Electricity

Grant

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Application Date

12/8/2010

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Grant Date

7/8/2014

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

00/00/0000

Title

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Related Topics

Capacitors, Microwave technology, Electromagnetism, Dielectrics, Electricity

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Status

Grant

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Subscribe to see more

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
CBI Logo

Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation Rank

CB Insights uses Cookies

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.