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INDUSTRIAL | Manufacturing
clevers.com.ar

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Founded Year

1988

Stage

Acquired | Acquired

About Clevers

Clevers is a manufacturer of gas springs and dampers with a focus on industrial clients, e.g. from the agricultural, engineering and transport sectors.

Clevers Headquarter Location

Av. Larrazabal 1949

Caba, 1440,

Argentina

(011) 2060-8010

Latest Clevers News

A Mubadala-backed biotech is using patient tumor tissue grown in a petri dish to change precision oncology

Jul 8, 2021

Max Gelman Editor As Duke pro­fes­sor Xil­ing Shen tells it, the idea for his new biotech Xilis dates all the way back to 2009. Shen taught at Cor­nell at the time, re­search­ing cir­cuit de­sign in the uni­ver­si­ty’s bio­engi­neer­ing de­part­ment, when he came across a pa­per from Dutch bi­ol­o­gist Hans Clevers about a tech­nol­o­gy called “organoids,” or tis­sue cul­tures made up of “3D gel.” Shen tells End­points News he saw the ther­a­peu­tic po­ten­tial here, al­low­ing sci­en­tists to test drugs on re­al pa­tient tis­sue in petri dish­es in what would be a first, but al­so won­dered about the lim­i­ta­tions of such tech­nol­o­gy. Could this process be ac­com­plished quick­ly and cheap­ly? And how chal­leng­ing would it be to scale up the tech to the point where it could be wide­ly used? Ay­man Al­Ab­dal­lah The lim­i­ta­tions have os­ten­si­bly been over­come enough to re­cruit blue-chip sov­er­eign wealth fund Mubadala to lead a $70 mil­lion Se­ries A for the biotech, putting a seal of ap­proval on the plat­form Shen be­lieves will trans­form the pre­ci­sion ther­a­py space. Us­ing organoid tech­nol­o­gy, Xilis is aim­ing to an­a­lyze pa­tients’ tu­mors in their na­tive mi­croen­vi­ron­ments in or­der to pro­vide more per­son­al­ized and bet­ter tar­get­ed can­cer treat­ments. In the can­cer space, where it can be dif­fi­cult to pre­dict how any giv­en ther­a­py might work for each in­di­vid­ual pa­tient, mod­el­ing tools like these are go­ing to be among the next wave of in­no­v­a­tive tech­nolo­gies, Mubadala in­vestor Ay­man Al­Ab­dal­lah said. “Less than one out of 10 can­cer drugs make it to mar­ket,” Al­Ab­dal­lah told End­points. “The con­nect­ed prob­lem here is once a drug is ap­proved it does not nec­es­sar­i­ly ben­e­fit all the pa­tients it’s ad­min­is­tered to … un­der­ly­ing this chal­lenge or bar­ri­er is the lack of tools to pre­cise­ly mod­el hu­man dis­ease out­side the body.” Shen had help bring­ing the tech­nol­o­gy to where it is to­day, he says. In 2014 he met co-founder David Hsu, a GI clin­i­cian at Duke, and the two teamed up. The per­spec­tive Hsu brought work­ing with pa­tients helped shape their shared vi­sion, and Shen moved his lab to Duke in 2015 to bet­ter fo­cus on build­ing out the plat­form. Hans Clevers Things came to a head in 2019 when Clevers vis­it­ed Duke to give a keynote speech. Shen and Hsu grabbed lunch with Clevers af­ter­wards, and Clevers not­ed some of the same lim­i­ta­tions Shen said he’d thought of all those years ear­li­er. By the next morn­ing, af­ter lis­ten­ing to how Shen worked to try over­com­ing them, Clevers agreed to join the com­pa­ny. At the heart of Xilis is a sim­ple, key con­cept: By tak­ing a piece of a pa­tient’s tu­mor tis­sue and grow­ing it as an organoid in a petri dish, Shen says re­searchers can test thou­sands of ther­a­pies or drug com­bi­na­tions to see how the tu­mor might re­act. By mod­el­ing tu­mors in such a way, Xilis can al­so get clin­i­cian in­put for how they’d pre­fer to treat their pa­tients. “It’s not just the cells but the in­volve­ment of the tu­mor, in­clud­ing im­mune cells, that’s re­al­ly mim­ic­k­ing the en­tire en­vi­ron­ment,” Shen told End­points. “For phar­ma, it’s al­so a sig­nif­i­cant ad­van­tage be­cause we’re the first that can en­cap­su­late the tu­mor with its orig­i­nal im­mune en­vi­ron­ment out­side the body.” The sci­en­tists got start­ed with a seed round back in No­vem­ber 2019 and start­ed look­ing for the Se­ries A this past April af­ter re­cruit­ing sev­er­al part­ners in the phar­ma space to use their tech­nol­o­gy. Xilis doesn’t have its own pipeline yet, but Shen says the biotech is cur­rent­ly fo­cused on help­ing these com­pa­nies com­plete their re­search faster. And the organoids can be used at any stage of the dis­cov­ery process, Shen adds, from the pre­clin­i­cal stage to in-hu­man tri­als. That could help bio­phar­mas de­sign smarter clin­i­cal tri­als down the road if they have a bet­ter idea of how their ex­per­i­men­tal drugs work. For now, Xilis plans to use the cash to fur­ther de­vel­op the plat­form and its AI ca­pa­bil­i­ties, as well as re­cruit­ing more part­ners. If every­thing goes ac­cord­ing to plan, the biotech hopes to shake up dif­fer­ent kinds of treat­ments across the cell ther­a­py space, Shen said. “The en­tire field right now faces a big chal­lenge dif­fer­ent from con­ven­tion­al drugs,” Shen said. “But these are very high­ly in­di­vid­u­al­ized ther­a­pies. How do you know you’ve en­gi­neered T cells that treat as many pa­tients as pos­si­ble? So we are pro­vid­ing the first en­abling tech­nolo­gies to test en­gi­neered T cells on the same pa­tients’ tu­mor be­fore they put it in­to the pa­tients.” Thurs­day’s Se­ries A was joined by new in­vestors in­clud­ing GV, LSP, Catalio Cap­i­tal Man­age­ment, and Duke An­gel Net­work. Cur­rent in­vestors Fe­li­cis Ven­tures, Two Sig­ma Ven­tures, Pear VC, KdT Ven­tures, and Al­ix Ven­tures al­so par­tic­i­pat­ed. AUTHOR Zachary Brennan Senior Editor While the FDA had controversially approved Biogen’s new Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm with a wide label for anyone with the debilitating disease, Biogen announced Thursday morning that it’s narrowing the drug’s label as part of an attempt to calm at least some of its fiercest critics. The unprecedented move means that the label now says that Aduhelm should be initiated in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease or mild Alzheimer’s dementia, which is reflective of the population in Biogen’s failed but resurrected clinical trials for the drug. The narrowed population may limit how much Medicare ends up spending on the drug, although if even a fraction of those with Alzheimer’s gain access to the drug, Biogen is likely to reap tens of billions of dollars per year from it. Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 111,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP Zachary Brennan Senior Editor As the vast majority of generic drugs and APIs are still made overseas, often in facilities where cost is a bigger concern than quality, both the Biden and Trump administrations have prioritized bringing back the manufacture of essential drugs and APIs to the US. At the forefront of this push is Phlow, which is currently building up its US-based manufacturing operations thanks to a four-year, $354 million contract from the Trump administration. Endpoints News sat down with Phlow CEO Eric Edwards via Zoom on Tuesday to discuss the company and all things essential medicines manufacturing. The interview is lightly edited for clarity. Premium subscription required Amber Tong Senior Editor When the FDA granted Biogen an accelerated approval for Biogen’s Aduhelm, it wasn’t just Alzheimer’s patients who got their hopes up. There is, for instance, a related condition called cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) — which, like Alzheimer’s, is thought to be triggered by accumulation of beta amyloid deposits. The difference is that the amyloid is deposited in vessels in the brain rather than as plaques, potentially leading to bleeding and injury. And patients wanted to know: Since Aduhelm was approved on its ability to clear the very same protein that’s causing their disease, should they be taking it off-label? Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription Unlock this story instantly and join 111,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free. SIGN UP

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CB Insights Intelligence Analysts have mentioned Clevers in 2 CB Insights research briefs, most recently on Jan 21, 2021.

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