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Clariter

clariter.com

About Clariter

Clariter specializes in the development of upcycling technology that transforms plastic waste into 3 industrial ingredients; oils, waxes, and solvents that make 1000+ plastic-free end products.

Headquarters Location

7, Rue Pierre d’Aspelt

1142,

Luxembourg

+352 2 021 1086

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Clariter Patents

Clariter has filed 1 patent.

patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

2/24/2014

6/28/2016

Fused filament fabrication, Plastic recycling, Plastics and the environment, Chemical processes, Recycling

Grant

Application Date

2/24/2014

Grant Date

6/28/2016

Title

Related Topics

Fused filament fabrication, Plastic recycling, Plastics and the environment, Chemical processes, Recycling

Status

Grant

Latest Clariter News

Your Next Scented Candle Could Be Made Of Recycled Plastic

Oct 24, 2022

Patented process breathes new life into waste destined for landfill  Discarded plastic is being turned into scented candles, ink, paint, and more than 1,000 other household products, thanks to an Israeli-founded startup. Conventional methods can only recycle plastic waste a handful of times, and the vast majority – over 90 per cent of the 300 million tonnes produced every year – ends up as landfill. But Clariter , co-founded by Israeli-born Ran Sharon, uses a unique, patented method of chemical recycling. It break plastics down to its base chemicals and raw materials to produce oils, waxes, and solvents that are used to make everyday household products. Mixed plastic waste that is chemically upcycled to make new products. Courtesy “Clariter is the only company that makes plastic into new products,” says Adi Sela Yemini, Sustainability & Business Development Manager at Clariter’s office in Kfar Saba, central Israel. “The plastic that nobody wants, that’s sent to landfills, is what we use.” Other companies chemically recycle plastic, but can only process about 15 per cent, and can only turn it into fuel, energy or other plastic products. Clariter’s technology allows it to use 85 per cent of the waste it collects, to create the raw materials for sports clothing, skin creams, cable coatings, and a wide array of other household products. Clariter has spent over a decade improving its high-quality products. Courtesy “We take plastic and transform it into chemical products that are normally produced by crude oil, addressing two huge problems at once: the plastic waste epidemic, and the dependency on crude oil,” Sela Yemini tells NoCamels. Crude oil is used to make petroleum, which is essential in products like soap, detergents, plastics, and even in textile production. Clariter transforms plastic waste in three steps. First, it uses high temperatures to melt down plastics to liquid hydrocarbons, the chemical compounds found in crude oil. Then it removes impurities from the liquidized raw materials. They include sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen, and any other additives used to give plastic its durable and flexible properties. High temperatures melt plastics down to liquid hydrocarbons. Courtesy And finally, the raw materials are distilled and separated to produce high-quality solvents, oils, and waxes. Some complex plastics, such as PEX (cross-linked polyethylene) are too rigid to be melted down by conventional and mechanical means, but can be chemically recycled with the Clariter process. There are thousands of different types of plastic. Clariter says it is able to process 60 to 70 per cent of them. Part of the reason over 90 per cent of all plastic is sent to landfills or is incinerated is that recycling centers simply can’t handle the volumes and different types of plastic. Clariter refines the hydrocarbons by removing impurities and additives. Courtesy Plastic needs to be carefully separated by type, by color, and by rigidity. “If plastics of different colors are recycled together, even if they are of the same type, you’re left with a grey-black material that no manufacturer wants,” says Sela Yemini. “So to be able to use and sell products in these packaging again, they also need to separate the plastics by color.” Sign up for our free weekly newsletter Mechanical recycling is also dependent on crude oil prices. If prices are low, it’s cheaper to create new plastics than it is to recycle, so waste plastic ends up as landfill. Clariter is capable of chemically recycling 60 to 70 per cent of all plastics without needing to sort them by type, color or rigidity. Courtesy Further, lots of plastics can’t be recycled if they aren’t cleaned by the user before they are dumped in the recycling bin. “It has its disadvantages. It takes time to separate, and it costs a lot of money. And after repeated recycling, the plastic loses its integrity and durability. So you can’t really recycle the same plastic more than four or five times,” says Sela Yemini. There are, however, plastics that Clariter cannot use in its upcycling technology: PET (polyethylene terephthalate), which is used for soda and water bottles, and is one of the most widely recycled plastics; PVC (polyvinyl chloride), which is mostly used for pipes, wires and cables; and PA (polyamide), which is commonly used in textiles like clothing and carpets. Clariter collects its plastic from different waste streams, such as municipal, industrial, and construction waste. The majority of these mixed waste types have a “negative value” – a producer needs to pay to get rid of them and send them to landfills. Every location has a different strategy, because every country deals with waste differently. In Israel, Clariter gets its plastic waste from sorting centers, waste suppliers, and landfill owners. The company offers them more money to send them the waste, double what they pay to transport it to landfills or incinerators. Before the plastic waste arrives at Clariter, it is shredded, washed and dried. “The plastic that suits us floats in water, and the plastic that doesn’t, sinks – like the PET and PA,” says Sela Yemini. A flowchart illustrating the chemical recycling process. Courtesy The entire process only yields about 10 per cent waste products. This is compared with other types of chemical recycling, which yields 85 per cent waste products. “We are currently doing research and development to find out how to upcycle the waste into products as well, like materials needed for infrastructure.” Since its inception in 2003, Clariter has mostly been researching and developing its chemical upcycling process. In 2018, it started operating an industrial plant in South Africa to prove the concept could work commercially. It become a central hub for R&D and engineering training. In the past two years, Clariter has been building commercial plants in Israel, Poland, and in the Netherlands. Clariter creates three products from plastic waste: oils, solvents, and waxes. Courtesy The first is expected to start operating by the end of 2025. Every plant will be able to upcycle 60,000 tonnes of plastic waste per year. Clariter is already eyeing the United States as its next market. It will eventually license its technology to support hundreds of plants around the world. By the end of 2028, the company estimates it will have rid the earth of 2 million tons of plastic waste that would otherwise have ended up in landfills, or incinerated. Subscribe to NoCamels weekly newsletter and get our top stories

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