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ring.com

Founded Year

2012

Stage

Acquired | Acquired

Total Raised

$213.7M

Valuation

$0000 

About Ring

Ring develops a simple yet strong Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell that streams live video of a home's front doorstep directly to a smartphone or tablet. Ring enables residents to not only see who is at their door but also chat with them, so as to never miss a visitor.

Ring Headquarter Location

1523 26th Street

Santa Monica, California, 90404,

United States

800-656-1918

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Research containing Ring

Get data-driven expert analysis from the CB Insights Intelligence Unit.

CB Insights Intelligence Analysts have mentioned Ring in 5 CB Insights research briefs, most recently on Mar 8, 2022.

Expert Collections containing Ring

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Ring is included in 3 Expert Collections, including Conference Exhibitors.

C

Conference Exhibitors

6,062 items

Companies that will be exhibiting at CES 2018

S

Smart Cities

1,193 items

Smart building tech covers energy management/HVAC tech, occupancy/security tech, connectivity/IoT tech, construction materials, robotics use in buildings, and the metaverse/virtual buildings.

S

Smart Home & Consumer Electronics

1,164 items

This Collection includes companies developing smart home devices, wearables, home electronics, and other consumer electronics.

Ring Patents

Ring has filed 134 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Image processing
  • Technical drawing
  • Wireless networking
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

11/15/2019

6/28/2022

Technical drawing, Graphical projections, Firearm components, Explosives, Sedimentary structures

Grant

Application Date

11/15/2019

Grant Date

6/28/2022

Title

Related Topics

Technical drawing, Graphical projections, Firearm components, Explosives, Sedimentary structures

Status

Grant

Latest Ring News

All the Data Amazon's Ring Cameras Collect About You

Aug 5, 2022

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories . If you walk through your local neighborhood—providing you live in a reasonably large town or city—you’ll be caught on camera. Government CCTV cameras may record your stroll, but it is increasingly likely that you’ll also be captured by one of your neighbors’ security cameras or doorbells . It’s even more likely that the camera will be made by Ring, the doorbell and security camera firm owned by Amazon. Videos shared from security cameras and internet-connected doorbells have also become common on platforms like Facebook and TikTok , raking in millions of views. “Ring impacts everybody’s privacy,” says Matthew Guariglia, a policy analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “Most immediately, it impacts the people who walk down the streets every day, where the cameras are pointing out.” While Ring is far from the only maker of smart doorbells and cameras—Google’s Nest line is another popular option—its connections to law enforcement have drawn the most criticism, as when it recently handed over data without warrants . So, what exactly does Ring collect and know about you? What Ring Knows About You Whenever you use any tech, it’s collecting data about you. Spotify uses the data it collects to work out your mood , Slack knows how many messages you send . Ring’s products are no different. Ring’s privacy policy —running 2,400 words—and its terms of service detail what it collects about you and how it uses that information. In short: It’s a lot. Ring gets your name, phone number, email and postal address, and any other information you provide to it—such as payment information or your social media handles if you link your Ring account to Facebook, for instance. The company also gets information about your Wi-Fi network and its signal strength, and it knows you named your camera “Secret CIA Watchpoint,” as well as all the other technical changes you make to your cameras or doorbells. In March 2020, a BBC information request revealed that Ring keeps detailed records of people’s doorbell activity. Every doorbell press was logged. Each motion the camera detected was stored. And details were saved every time someone zoomed in on footage on their phone. In just 129 days, 4906 actions were recorded. (Ring says it does not sell people’s data.) Ring can also collect the video and audio your camera records—the system doesn’t record all the time, but it can be triggered when it senses movement. Ring says its cameras can detect movement “up to 155 degrees horizontally” and across distances of up to 25 feet . This means there’s a good chance cameras can be triggered by people walking down the street or pick up conversations of passersby. According to tests by Consumer Reports , some Ring cameras can record audio from about 20 feet away. Most Popular Gian M. Volpicelli Jolynn Dellinger, a senior lecturing fellow focusing on privacy and ethics at Duke University’s school of law, says recording audio when someone is on the street is a “serious problem” for privacy and may change how people behave. “We operate with a sense of obscurity, even in public,” Dellinger says. “We are in danger of increasing surveillance of everyday life in a way that is not consistent with either our expected views or really what’s best for society.” In October 2021, a British woman won a court case that said her neighbor’s Ring cameras, which overlooked her house and garden, broke data laws . Ring’s privacy policy says it can save videos of subscribers to its Ring Protect Plan, a paid service that provides an archive of 180 days of video and audio captured. The company says people can log in to the service to delete the videos, but the company may ultimately keep them anyway. “Deleted Content and Ring Protect Recordings may be stored by Ring in order to comply with certain legal obligations and are not retrievable without a valid court order,” the privacy policy says. Ring spokesperson Sarah Rall says this could apply if the company added features or use cases that are not already covered by its privacy policy. “We would provide additional notice or get permission as needed,” Rall says. Ring can also keep videos shared to its Neighbors’ app—an app where people and law enforcement agencies can share alerts about “crimes” and post their videos of what is happening around the homes. (There are rules about what people are allowed to post.) Ring’s privacy policy and terms of service allow it to use all this information it collects in multiple ways. It lists 14 ways the company can use your data—from improving the service Ring provides and protecting against fraud to conducting consumer research and complying with legal requirements. Its privacy policy includes the ambiguous statement: “We also may use the personal information we collect about you in other ways for which we provide specific notice at the time of collection and obtain your consent if required by applicable law.” While Ring’s privacy policies apply to those who purchase its devices, people who are captured in footage or audio don’t have a chance to agree to them. “Privacy, security, and customer control are foundational to Ring, and we take the protection of our customers’ personal and account information seriously,” Rall says. Ultimately, you agree to give Ring permission to control the “content” you share—including audio and video—while you own the intellectual property to it. The company’s terms of service say you give it an “unlimited, irrevocable, fee free and royalty-free, perpetual, worldwide right” to store, use, copy, or modify content you share through Neighbors or elsewhere online. (Audio recording can be turned off in Ring’s settings.) “When I went out to buy a security camera last year, I looked for ones only that did local storage,” says Jen Caltrider, the lead researcher on Mozilla’s Privacy Not Included, which evaluates the privacy and security of products. Caltrider says people should try to keep as much control of their data as possible and not store files in the cloud unless they need to. “I don’t want any company having this data that I can’t control. I want to be able to control it.” How Ring Works With Police Ring’s deals with police forces—both in the US and the UK—have proved controversial. For years, the company has partnered with law enforcement agencies, providing them with cameras and doorbells that can be given to residents . By the start of 2021, Ring had partnered with more than 2,000 US law enforcement and fire departments . Documents have shown how Ring also controls the public messaging of police departments it has partnered with . “There is nothing mandating Ring build a tool that is easily accessible and helpful to police,” Guariglia says. Rings’ terms of service say that the company may “access, use, preserve and/or disclose” videos and audio to “law enforcement authorities, government officials, and/or third parties” if it is legally required to do so or needs to in order to enforce its terms of service or address security issues. Government officials could include any “regulatory agency or legislative committee that issues a legally binding request for information,” Rall says. For the six months between January and June 2022, Ring says it had more than 3,500 law enforcement requests in the US . Most Popular

  • When was Ring founded?

    Ring was founded in 2012.

  • Where is Ring's headquarters?

    Ring's headquarters is located at 1523 26th Street, Santa Monica.

  • What is Ring's latest funding round?

    Ring's latest funding round is Acquired.

  • How much did Ring raise?

    Ring raised a total of $213.7M.

  • Who are the investors of Ring?

    Investors of Ring include Amazon, Felicis, Richard Branson, True Ventures, Shea Ventures and 19 more.

  • Who are Ring's competitors?

    Competitors of Ring include SimpliSafe, SkyBell Technologies, Level Home, Netatmo, Arlo Technologies and 8 more.

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