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SOFTWARE (NON-INTERNET/MOBILE) | Scientific, Engineering Software
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Founded Year

2003

About Bluesky

Bluesky is an aerial survey company. The company provides survey, geographic, and CAD data, including aerial photography, mapping, aerial survey, GIS, tree mapping, thermal survey, 3d modeling, remote sensing, terrain data, topographic mapping, and LiDAR. It is based in Ashby-De-La-Zouch, England.

Bluesky Headquarter Location

The Station Station Road

Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, LE65 2AS,

United Kingdom

Latest Bluesky News

CES is returning to Vegas. Will the tech world follow?

Nov 30, 2021

Mandy Price (she/her/hers) is an advocate for diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) as the CEO and co-founder of Kanarys, Inc., a technology company focused on providing the tools organizations need to create long-term systemic change around DEI challenges. Kanarys uses a data-based approach to pinpoint what companies may not have been able to see before so DEI strategies and interventions are precise, measurable and result in lasting transformation.Mandy left her career as a Harvard-educated attorney to co-found Kanarys, a DEI tech platform that fosters collaboration between companies and employees on DEI in the workplace. Mandy regularly speaks at notable DEI, tech and leadership conferences and has been featured by outlets like Good Morning America, Entrepreneur, Forbes, TechCrunch, Business Insider, The Wall Street Journal and more. Her interest in DEI began early in her career when she helped create the division of diversity and community engagement at the University of Texas at Austin as an undergrad. November 30, 2021 Mandy Price is the CEO and co-founder of Kanarys , a technology company focused on providing the tools organizations need to create long-term systemic change around diversity, equity and inclusion challenges. As employees start to head back into offices and return to a new normal of lingering health anxiety and hybrid working environments, it's even more important for employers to have appropriate policies in place to encourage mental wellness in the workplace. Now more than ever ignoring employees' mental and emotional wellness is simply not an option for managers. The importance of promoting mental health As Airtable’s co-founder, Andrew spearheads Airtable’s long-term product bets and represents the voice of the customer in major product decisions. After co-founding the company, he helped scale Airtable’s original product and engineering teams. He previously led the redesign of Google's flagship Maps product, and before that was a product manager for Android. November 10, 2021 The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that by 2026, the shortage of engineers in the U.S. will exceed 1.2 million, while 545,000 software developers will have left the market by that time. Meanwhile, business is becoming increasingly more digital-first, and teams need the tools in place to keep distributed teams aligned and able to respond quickly to changing business needs. That means businesses need to build powerful workplace applications without relying on developers. In fact, according to Gartner , by 2025, 70% of new applications developed by enterprises will use low-code or no-code technologies and, by 2023, there will be at least four times as many active citizen developers as professional developers at large enterprises. We're on the cusp of a big shift in how businesses operate and how organization wide innovation happens. Giving people the power to build software that's not only fully customized to their teams' needs and workflows but is also visual and simple will do more than improve how their organizations operate — it will transform work as we know it. Allowing rigid, one-size-fits-all software to dictate your teams' workflows will be a relic of the past as teams unlock the efficiency and power that comes with building hyper-optimized applications for their specific workflows and teams. When the people that use the software can customize it to adapt to their needs on the fly, teams can more easily manage rapid change, adjusting the software to adapt to new processes and business needs without a developer's time or resources. And given the increasing rate of change in the world today, this ability to move faster isn't just a nice-to-have; it's mission-critical for staying competitive. Over the past 15 years, 40% of companies on the Fortune 500 have disappeared from the list. Although some of them simply saw their growth eclipsed by upstarts, nearly all faced outside disruption they were ill-equipped to react to. Fortunately, today's leading companies have an advantage that their predecessors didn't — workplace technology that gives them the agility of the most successful and disruptive startups. When people can move beyond one-size-fits-all software and build the right solutions around self-designed business processes, it unlocks the differentiation needed to compete in increasingly crowded markets. This type of agility can be a company's secret sauce as team members, regardless of role or function, are empowered to drive innovation across the organization. We founded Airtable on the notion that the people doing the work within companies should be the ones building the software they use. For over a decade, we've offered the basic building blocks of software for people without advanced technical skills to build the applications they need. Today more than 250,000 organizations, including 80% of the Fortune 100, use Airtable to build workflows that precisely fit their team's needs and will scale with them as they grow. With Interface Designer, our newest feature, teams can now create complete, three-part applications in Airtable — a flexible database layer for their most critical information, a logic layer that automates manual or complex work and now an interface layer that allows people to customize how others interact with what they build. Interface Designer's simple drag-and-drop tools are built for anyone to use to simplify, contextualize and visualize their data and present their workflow as a full application that their team can easily view, interact with and contribute to. Creators can build multiple interfaces to make complex data accessible, actionable and shareable in a visual way that's uniquely powerful to each person in their organization. Creator-designed software not only needs to work: It needs to be dead simple for everyone in an organization to be able to easily understand and interact with it. Simple drag-and-drop custom layouts mean that it takes minutes, not hours, to create an interface and share a full application with teams. Now teams can easily build consumer-grade applications that help them reach their most ambitious outcomes faster. And instead of hiring a developer or waiting for an IT department's resources to free up, the people closest to the work — marketing, product and HR team members — can build custom interfaces tailored specifically to how their teams operate and customized to how others in their organization think and work. Whether it's reporting on progress to executives, gathering information from other teams or creating review and approval processes, people can now build simple and beautiful, yet powerful, applications within Airtable to orchestrate how work gets done. Interface Designer enables teams to build complete applications that give teammates the information they need to take action. Mia Lama, a product operations specialist at Twilio, for example, needs to customize how information is shared across several different teams to ensure people have the right context and clear understanding of what's needed from them. She shared: "As our workflows have evolved, they've become more complex and cross-functional, making it difficult to provide context and clear processes. With Interface Designer, we can customize the way data is shared across teams, allowing us to make right decisions in real time." Empowering everyone to create the exact applications they need to manage their work -- apps that look and feel like the ones we use in our personal lives -- will let us accomplish more and unlock new sources of creativity for the world. The next generation of innovators won't be Silicon Valley engineers, they'll be marketers, product managers, operations managers, and content creators who have the new superpower to build software that drives progress for their organizations. Keep ReadingShow less On the stand in her fraud trial, the former Theranos CEO alleged sexual and emotional abuse by her former professional and personal partner. On the fourth day of her testimony, Elizabeth Holmes broke down for the first time as she discussed her relationship with Sunny Balwani. Photo: Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images November 29, 2021 Nat Rubio-Licht is a Los Angeles-based news writer at Protocol. They graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in newspaper and online journalism in May 2020. Prior to joining the team, they worked at the Los Angeles Business Journal as a technology and aerospace reporter. November 29, 2021 This story contains mention of sexual assault. Elizabeth Holmes has blamed many people along the way for the swift downfall of her blood-testing startup, Theranos. But on the fourth day of her testimony in the fraud case against her, she pointed the finger at the man who was once her close professional and personal partner: Sunny Balwani. Along with testifying that Balwani, former COO and president of Theranos, was in charge of its lab operations and finances with little oversight, Holmes testified that he controlled her life down to the minute, including daily schedules, diet plans and critiques on the way she talked in the course of a decade-long romantic relationship which they hid from the company. Balwani faces his own fraud charges related to his work at Theranos, for which a separate trial is scheduled to start in January. Verbal abuse occurred often, Holmes testified. She said Balwani told her what to eat, how to exercise discipline and how to act more like a man in order to better lead Theranos. According to Holmes, Balwani said she came across as a “little girl” and needed to rein in her excitement in interactions. In one note presented to the jury, Balwani wrote to Holmes "do everything I say — word for word.” Another handwritten note listed out tenets for her to live by: "I do not react. Anna Kramer is a reporter at Protocol (Twitter: @ anna_c_kramer , email: akramer@protocol.com), where she writes about labor and workplace issues. Prior to joining the team, she covered tech and small business for the San Francisco Chronicle and privacy for Bloomberg Law. She is a recent graduate of Brown University, where she studied International Relations and Arabic and wrote her senior thesis about surveillance tools and technological development in the Middle East. November 29, 2021 When Parag Agrawal was at Stanford writing his computer science thesis, his adviser couldn’t imagine that any of her students would become the CEO of one of the world’s most powerful social media companies. But much has changed since Agrawal graduated with his doctorate in 2012. On Monday morning, Twitter announced that Jack Dorsey had resigned and that Chief Technology Officer Agrawal had been promoted to CEO, effective immediately. Dorsey, who drew frequent criticism for acting as the CEO of Twitter and payments-company Square at the same time, has long been obsessed with bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and has championed their adoption inside Twitter. The social media company’s embrace of decentralization and blockchain will likely not lessen with his departure , however; Agrawal has been Dorsey’s much quieter partner in this area, leading the hiring for Twitter research decentralization project Bluesky and for Twitter’s new cryptocurrency unit. Both Jay Graber — Bluesky’s new leader — and Tess Rinearson — Twitter’s crypto team leader — worked quite closely with Agrawal in his previous role. “I read this as Twitter wanting to invest in innovation (given that he has been at the forefront of the blockchain stuff, etc.). I’m super excited that an engineer can rise up to be the CEO of a publicly traded company,” Raffi Krikorian, CTO of the Emerson Collective and a former VP of Engineering at Twitter, told Protocol. Jennifer Widom, Agrawal’s thesis adviser and the dean of Engineering at Stanford, described Agrawal as thoughtful, analytical and especially good at the foundational theoretical and mathematical thinking she asked of her students. His research explored questions about how to deal with messy, undefined data. “He would never have gone to business school,” she said. But since leaving the hallowed halls of Stanford’s computer science doctoral program, Agrawal found business school somewhere else: inside Twitter. He quickly made a name for himself at the company, developing a reputation as someone eager to learn anything he didn’t know. He started work as an individual contributor engineer, working across both the platform team and the revenue team. He led an ML team for a period of time, and also served as the point leader for the platform team. He was appointed Twitter’s first distinguished software engineer — a prestigious honor at the company reserved for a mere handful in total — and then chief technology officer, after just six years as a "tweep." “He became CTO even when he hadn’t been there all that long. He obviously had a big impact right away when he arrived,” Widom said. As CTO, Agrawal was responsible for leading much of Twitter’s machine-learning efforts, and he championed the work of Twitter’s recently expanded Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency and Accountability team, spearheaded by Rumman Chowdhury. When Chowdhury agreed to join the company to helm the effort, she said that she was deeply encouraged by Agrawal’s previous work on Twitter’s image-cropping algorithm, which the META team continued after she was hired. Some Twitter users had complained for years that the algorithm seemed to favor men and people with lighter skin in how it auto-cropped images on the social feed, and Agrawal led the initial investigation into studying bias in the algorithm and helped arrange the plan to remove it after the researchers concluded there was indeed some bias present. The image-cropping algorithm research was shared publicly in May and the algorithm was removed based on the research. A person familiar with the META team’s work inside Twitter described him as instrumental in the team’s push for public transparency about decision-making and one of the people who helped ensure that Responsible ML was one of Twitter’s 2021 official priorities. “He’s consistently been a strong strategic partner in breaking down barriers and providing guidance and resources. Team META is sharing a few things in January and I feel confident assuming that they won’t be abandoned or ignored under new leadership,” Chowdhury wrote on Twitter. Agrawal’s work ethic and motivation to learn was well known and regarded inside the company, according to several Twitter employees. One year, in preparation for Twitter’s hack week, he read several books and took courses in machine learning just to prepare, according to the same Twitter employee familiar with his work. Software engineers at Twitter have complained for years about technical debt — the implied future cost of additional work created by choosing the easy over the better solution in the present. This makes the work more difficult, which Agrawal admitted and described as a major priority in an interview in March 2021, calling Twitter’s tech structure a “ball of hair.” He has strong thoughts on the “build vs. buy” paradigm for Twitter’s tech stack, and he led the company’s transition away from its determined obsession with building all of its own services and toward its purchase of Google Cloud and AWS offerings. Twitter critics have also taken major issue with the company’s relative lethargy to ship new products and features. Agrawal has been partially responsible for addressing those critiques by helping to shape more aggressive goals for 2021 and 2022, leading to a recent spate of acquisitions, growth and product launches, among them the already-described META team, Spaces, the now-defunct Fleets and the subscription product known as Twitter Blue. Widom — who also attended Agrawal’s wedding — hosted Agrawal and his wife, Vineeta Agarwala, and their son for a backyard happy hour a few months ago. Vineeta Agarwala is a general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, where she leads investments for the firm’s bio funds. Widom described them as a “power couple” who, despite their impressive careers, “are very, very down-to-earth. He’s not egocentric at all. A very straightforward person,” she said. Additional reporting by Issie Lapowsky. Keep ReadingShow less Issie Lapowsky ( @issielapowsky ) is Protocol's chief correspondent, covering the intersection of technology, politics, and national affairs. She also oversees Protocol's fellowship program. Previously, she was a senior writer at Wired, where she covered the 2016 election and the Facebook beat in its aftermath. Prior to that, Issie worked as a staff writer for Inc. magazine, writing about small business and entrepreneurship. She has also worked as an on-air contributor for CBS News and taught a graduate-level course at New York University's Center for Publishing on how tech giants have affected publishing. November 29, 2021 In his note Monday announcing his departure from Twitter, Jack Dorsey delivered a warm welcome to the company’s new CEO, a fond farewell to the tweeps he’s leaving behind and a quick shout-out to his mom. He also fired a warning shot at certain other founder-CEOs who shall remain nameless. “There’s a lot of talk about the importance of a company being ‘founder-led.’ Ultimately I believe that’s severely limiting and a single point of failure,” Dorsey wrote. “There aren’t many companies that get to this level. And there aren’t many founders that choose their company over their own ego.” Whether that’s the real reason for Dorsey’s departure after nearly 16 years as a company leader and two stints as its CEO remains in question, and maybe even in doubt. Until today Dorsey was, after all, the simultaneous CEO of two publicly traded companies — one of which he was nearly ousted from last year — and his apparent new calling in life, bitcoin, has precious little to do with a social network for sharing quippy takes on pop culture and global catastrophe. That there are other dynamics at play in Dorsey’s decision to hand over the CEO role to Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal, effective immediately, is almost certain. But Dorsey’s point about founder-led companies is still well-taken: Maybe, he seems to suggest, the people responsible for dreaming up what a company could be at the beginning aren’t always — or even ever — the best people to run it after it has become something else entirely. The company Dorsey leaves behind is almost unrecognizable from the one he co-founded in 2006, or even the one he returned to as CEO in 2015. That June, when Twitter announced Dorsey’s encore as CEO, his biggest obstacle was finding a way to jumpstart sluggish growth. Less than one week later, Donald Trump descended an escalator inside Trump Tower, announcing his bid for the presidency and resetting the agenda of Dorsey’s next six years. Suddenly, Dorsey was grappling not just with demands from investors — though those continued — but also with the world’s first Tweeter-in-Chief, who used the platform for years to prolifically spew hate and conspiracies with little interruption from Twitter and who, in doing it, wrote a playbook for global strongmen and fringe politicians to follow. Under Dorsey’s lead, Twitter initially took a hands-off approach, crafting new rules that allowed elected officials to say just about whatever they wanted. When you’re a global leader, Trump’s presidency proved, they let you do it. Trump’s election ushered in a new era of scrutiny for social media companies, Twitter included. As the extent of the information warfare playing out on tech platforms became clearer, Washington wanted Twitter and others to do something about the bots and the trolls and, depending on who you asked, the censorship — or lack thereof — of some conservatives. These are the problems Agrawal now inherits — problems Dorsey and his co-founders couldn’t have imagined in Twitter’s earliest days. To Dorsey’s credit, Twitter has made progress on some of these fronts. In 2019, Dorsey embarked on an apology tour of sorts, taking seemingly every interview as a chance to lament Twitter’s failures and commit to making the platform a “healthier” place. The company seems to have earnestly sought to deliver on that goal. At a time when Google was firing its top AI ethicists and Facebook was disbanding its civic integrity team, Twitter was recruiting top tech critics to oversee its ethical AI work and expand the team with Dorsey’s direct blessing. The company has also experimented in plain sight with tools that discourage toxic conversations before they start and enable auto-blocking of hateful tweets. It’s opened up its full archive to researchers so they can study the platform from the outside in. And of course, early this year, after wallpapering his account in warning labels, Twitter finally banned Trump for life. But far from relishing in the decision, Dorsey described the ban as “a failure of ours ultimately to promote healthy conversation.” “Having to take these actions fragment the public conversation. They divide us,” Dorsey tweeted at the time. “They limit the potential for clarification, redemption, and learning. And [it] sets a precedent I feel is dangerous: the power an individual or corporation has over a part of the global public conversation.” Dorsey made much the same argument then that he is now: That no one person, including himself, should have so much power — and certainly not the one person who, by virtue of having founded a company, may be the most blinkered to its failures. Plenty of prominent tech founders have stepped down from leadership roles at their companies: Larry Page, Sergey Brin and Bill Gates, to name a few. That leaves Mark Zuckerberg as the last obvious Big Tech target of Dorsey’s admonitions. Zuckerberg has also often lamented the concentration of power in his hands, but only to urge governments to impose light, industry-approved regulations, not to advocate for his own removal. As recent leaks from Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen have shown, Zuckerberg remains deeply, personally involved in everything from annual staffing decisions to whether Facebook should bow to pressure to censor dissidents in Vietnam. These and other revelations have led to constant calls for Zuckerberg to step down and let someone else lead the global behemoth that was once a dorm-room experiment. Though he didn’t name him outright, Dorsey’s note does seem like yet another not-so-thinly veiled dig at Zuckerberg. Of course, it was the cult of the founder that brought Dorsey back as CEO of Twitter in 2015. Even though he was simultaneously CEO of Square, a position he still holds, hopes were high that Dorsey’s ties to Twitter’s roots would help him more clearly envision its future. Six years later, he’s stepping back only now that he has another dream to chase — and another company to run. From Your Site Articles

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Bluesky Patents

Bluesky has filed 3 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Computing input devices
  • Marketing
  • Promotion and marketing communications
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Computing input devices, Marketing, Promotion and marketing communications, Retailing, Supply chain management

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