Predict your next investment

Bjarke Ingels Group company logo
Corporation
INDUSTRIAL | Construction / Construction & Design Services
big.dk

See what CB Insights has to offer

Founded Year

2006

About Bjarke Ingels Group

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is a Copenhagen and New York based group of architects, designers, and builders operating within the fields of architecture, urbanism, research and development.

Bjarke Ingels Group Headquarter Location

45 Main St 9th Floor

Brooklyn, New York, 11201,

United States

347-549-4141

Latest Bjarke Ingels Group News

The billionaire who wants to build a $540b utopian city in the US desert

Oct 17, 2021

Telosa’s location is being targeted in the Appalachia or American West desert with plans to shepherd in a reformed version of capitalism with a focus on societal inclusion over division. Lore imagines Telosa having excellent healthcare and schooling, and safe environments for families, regardless of income. He wants Telosa to be a diverse place housing people from all races, genders, sexual orientations, religions and political affiliations. Former Walmart executive and Jet.com founder Marc Lore. Credit:AP But building the “city of the future” will be risky and complicated. Experts and researchers have long maintained that too many financial hurdles can stand in the way, with one 2014 study arguing that “the ability of eco-cities to achieve their utopian ambitions may be limited by the realities of operating within a profit-driven, entrepreneurial planning environment.” Yet that’s where Lore says Telosa can be different. Telosa’s name derives from the Ancient Greek word telos – meaning “higher purpose.” Conceptual art of Telosa looks like it’s pulled from a science-fiction movie. Nearly everything is fuelled by solar power; there’s autonomous electric cars and high-speed public transport. Designs from architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the company that created the Google and Apple headquarters, shows 60,700 hectares of eco-friendly architecture, including a skyscraper known as the Equitism Tower. Advertisement The $US400 billion ($540 billion) project will take massive buy-in from key investors to even get off the ground. Factor in Lore’s lofty goals that start with a first phase of 50,000 living residents to be welcomed into the city by 2030 and the public scepticism is hardly hidden. That’s not lost on Lore, who sees the attempt just as important as the end goal. The ambitious goal is to welcome residents by 2030, with a goal of eventually having a population of 5 million people. Credit:Bjarke Ingels Group and Bucharest Studio “I’m not pursuing this to make money,” said Lore, a co-owner of the NBA’s Minnesota Timberwolves. “I’m doing this because of what it can mean for others and the future. If this entire attempt doesn’t work, then hopefully there are things to learn from it and it will inspire others to take their shot.” Loading ‘I don’t want to be the ruler of the city’ The entrepreneur said his role is mostly to provide a placeholder for the people to create the city’s culture themselves. ”I don’t want to be the ruler of the city; this is more of a public service,” Lore said. “I’m wanting to give it a place to grow and flourish. It’s not meant to be a private city; it’s meant to be a city for everyone.” Lore calls his model “equitism” and it would allow any Telosa citizen to build their home and sell it, but the city would retain ownership of the land that’s underneath. In a dream scenario, Lore believes Telosa’s desert land would eventually balloon in value to be worth $US1 trillion. Lore said that land value, which could come out to $50 billion from investments and endowments, would go directly toward the city’s funding to ensure that every family had equal access to healthcare and schools. Top-down economic models present complications, but they’ve been achieved elsewhere. The concept of community-owned land on a large scale is on display in Singapore, where the government owns 90 per cent of the country’s land and then the proceeds are reinvested in the country. Loading “The sole purpose of creating a city in the desert would be so it’s owned by the community – basically take all the appreciation of the land and give it back to the citizens,” Lore said. “Taxes paid will go back to the city for infrastructure – roads, tunnels and bridges – so everyone would know exactly where their money is going.” The selection process for the first 50,000 residents is yet to be determined but will likely be done by application. But who will they be and where will they work? Lore said much of the framework for the first “settlers” will be sorted out with aid from his team of 50 volunteers and full-timers made up of architects, historians, researchers, economists, creatives, designers, engineers and climate experts. “We can’t create a city without some early nudging to move to the city,” Lore said. “We’ll have to kickstart in an unconventional way, but the hope is we’ll position the people to grow a culture.” Once the first phase begins in 2030, Lore said the hope of the equitism model is to let the people drive the creation of the city’s culture and then accentuate the diversity through respect and an equal value system. “How does a city have a soul?” Lore said. “It’s not about buildings and roads, it’s about the values and the city standing for something. We don’t know what that is yet, but we want to find out.” Telosa: Marc Lore’s vision for a city in the American desert. Credit:Bjarke Ingels Group and Bucharest Studio Lore said Telosa will be intentionally apolitical with its creation and potential launch. “We want to involve Democrats and Republicans, people with differing opinions,” he said. “How do we bring people together? It’s always in the how. We intend to be transparent as one team with one vision.” There will also be practical challenges to address. One of those concerns will be a sufficient water system in the desert. “It will require us to use technology in ways we’re not today so that we can have a city live off of 80 per cent less water per person. That can set up a future we’re prepared for where water is more scarce.” This isn’t the first time that a Utopian city has been attempted by a wealthy person. Bill Gates announced in 2017 plans to build a smart city outside of Phoenix . Millionaire Jeffrey Berns also bought land in Nevada for a smart city. Lore sees his vision as different. “I’m very open to others’ opinions and I want (Telosa) to be based on the collective thinking of people in the world,” Lore said. “I don’t have all the answers,” Lore said. “But each day I’m learning.” McClatchy

Predict your next investment

The CB Insights tech market intelligence platform analyzes millions of data points on venture capital, startups, patents , partnerships and news mentions to help you see tomorrow's opportunities, today.

Research containing Bjarke Ingels Group

Get data-driven expert analysis from the CB Insights Intelligence Unit.

CB Insights Intelligence Analysts have mentioned Bjarke Ingels Group in 1 CB Insights research brief, most recently on Nov 5, 2020.

Bjarke Ingels Group Web Traffic

Rank
Page Views per User (PVPU)
Page Views per Million (PVPM)
Reach per Million (RPM)
CBI Logo

Bjarke Ingels Group Rank

CB Insights uses Cookies

CBI websites generally use certain cookies to enable better interactions with our sites and services. Use of these cookies, which may be stored on your device, permits us to improve and customize your experience. You can read more about your cookie choices at our privacy policy here. By continuing to use this site you are consenting to these choices.