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AGRICULTURE | Agricultural products & related activities
binovafertilizantes.com.br

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Stage

Acquired | Acquired

About Binova

Binova is a specialty fertilizer company.

Binova Headquarter Location

Av. Antônio Diederichsen, 400 Ribeirao Preto

Sao Paulo, 14020-250,

Brazil

Latest Binova News

Anheuser-Busch joins How2Recycle effort

Aug 24, 2021

Anheuser-Busch joins How2Recycle effort St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch says it has joined the How2Recycle labeling program, implementing what it calls “the program’s consumer-friendly recyclability labeling system to help educate and encourage consumers to recycle their beer bottles, cans and packaging.” The -based Sustainable Packaging Coalition describes How2Recycle as a standardized labeling system adopted by more than 375 brands and retailers designed to clearly communicate recycling instructions to consumers. “By adding the How2Recycle label to its packaging, Anheuser-Busch is proud to join other leading companies in bringing increased awareness to the program which helps to empower consumers to recycle more and recycle better,” states the company. Comments Angie Slaughter, vice president of sustainability procurement at Anheuser-Busch, “To achieve a truly sustainable supply chain, we need to ensure that our packaging is not only produced sustainably but that our consumers are educated and inspired to join us in this commitment and help to create a more circular future for us all.” Anheuser-Busch says it aims to have 100 percent of its packaging made from majority recycled content or returnable by the year 2025. The How2Recycle logo will be rolled out across Anheuser-Busch’s portfolio of brands starting this summer with the Bud Light brand, including on its National Football League (NFL) packaging “Consumers are increasingly passionate about supporting our planet, but in many cases they may not have the information and resources readily available to properly recycle,” says Colleen Lucas, vice president of corporate social responsibility at Anheuser-Busch. “By partnering with our retailers and leveraging the reach of our brands to highlight the How2Recycle program, we hope that our consumers will not only recycle our packaging but will also be empowered to keep an eye out for this label across all of their favorite products.” Among potential allies is Walmart. That retailer’s senior vice president of sustainability, Jane Ewing, comments, “As part of our commitment to becoming a regenerative company, we encourage suppliers to include more consumer-friendly recycling information on packaging. We’re excited to see Anheuser-Busch adopting the How2Recycle label to better inform customers on how to recycle their packaging.” The Sustainable Packaging Coalition (SPC) has prequalified Inteplast Engineered Film’s (IEF) InteGreen store drop-off recycle-ready barrier films with the How2Recycle store drop-off label, which will allow consumers to discard this packaging at retail stores for recycling. IEF, a plastic film producer based in Livingston, New Jersey, says the store drop-off recycle-ready barrier films come in clear and white versions and are designed for applications that require high oxygen and moisture barriers. According to a news release from IEF, How2Recycle also provides consumers with a search tool for store drop-off locations, such as Target, Walmart and Wegmans, all of which accept the InteGreen recycle-ready film as well as other polyethylene films. “Our introducing the store drop-off recycle-ready barrier films is another example of our commitment to bringing sustainable films to our customers,” says Bob Stein, president of IEF . “We are excited that the SPC has prequalified our film and look forward to bringing more solutions under our InteGreen brand to the growing market demand for responsible products.” IEF launched its InteGreen line of films in November 2020. The company says the line incorporates recycled resins, bio-based materials, home and industrial compostability and store drop-off recycle-ready properties. IEF adds that it is in the process of expanding its recycle-ready portfolio to include other materials such as nylon. “For our customers, who are the converters that make consumer packaging as well as brand owners who are looking for sustainable packaging options, our InteGreen store drop-off recycle-ready barrier films is the perfect choice. It allows them the option to create consumer packaging for products that require a moisture and oxygen barrier with the option of store drop-off recyclability, all without compromising food safety and shelf life,” says Steve Griggs, director of sales at IEF. IEF’s InteGreen films are produced at six of its locations—Westborough, Massachusetts; Dalton, Georgia; Prattville, Alabama; Orlando, Florida; Garland, Texas; and Vaughan, Ontario. Thomas “Tommy” Stump, who served as president and CEO of Chatham, Virginia-headquartered First Piedmont Corp. for 41 years, died Aug. 18 at the age of 63. Founded in 1969, First Piedmont Corp. provides industrial, commercial and residential waste management services in Virginia and North Carolina. Stump served in various capacities on waste association boards and committees during his time in the industry The National Waste & Recycling Association issued the following statement on Stump’s passing: “The National Waste & Recycling Association (NWRA) joins the waste and recycling industry as we mourn the loss of former First Piedmont Corp. President and CEO Tommy Stump. Tommy was a strong advocate for the industry. He served in various leadership positions in the Virginia Waste Industries Association as well as on the NWRA board of governors and NWRA board of trustees. We extend our deepest condolences to his family and friends.” Stump’s obituary can be found online . Because single-use plastics are often less expensive to produce, historically the circular economy hasn’t been at the forefront for these applications. © Daizuoxin | dreamstime.com Commentary: Addressing plastics in the circular economy Manufacturers and recyclers can move closer to achieving a circular economy for plastic scrap in several ways. The circular economy can be defined as an ideal, zero-waste economy where the materials we use every day follow a closed-loop, circular journey that starts with manufacturing and utilization and then moves into reuse, repair, redistribute, refurbish, remanufacture and sometimes compost. With a circular economy, everything comes back and is used again in one form or another, minimizing or completely eliminating landfills and incineration. The circular economy differs from the existing linear economy, where things are produced, used and then some things can be reused or recycled, but some things end up in the landfill, oceans or other places they don’t belong. Some types of plastics are especially problematic in terms of recycling, but increasingly, manufacturers are becoming more conscious of the materials they’re producing and using to ensure that they can either be recycled, reused or composted. In some cases, nonrecyclable and hard-to-recycle plastics are designed and used largely for convenience and for marketing. These items include single-use grocery bags, beverage cups and clamshell packaging made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) that is used by some fast-food restaurants. Ultimately, these packages are designed for customer convenience. They’re easy to use, disposable in the sense that they’re not intended for reuse, and they can be designed with company branding and marketing slogans. But there has to be a conscious effort to use different types of plastics that can be recycled, reused and redesigned in order to become part of that circular economy. Because it’s often less expensive to produce and use these types of plastics for products that are only going to be used once, historically the circular economy hasn’t been at the forefront for these applications in light of cost. But there has to be a conscious effort to use different types of plastics that can be recycled, reused and redesigned to become part of that circular economy. Manufacturers and marketers aren’t solely responsible for the use of nonrecyclable and hard-to-recycle plastics. As noted, most of these single-use items are designed for the convenience of consumers, and consumers may or may not have a recycling program set up either in their homes or in their communities. For many people, it’s a lot simpler to throw these plastics in the trash. Sometimes it doesn’t matter if the plastic is recyclable or not; it’s a matter of being conscious about recycling. Circular solutions For manufacturers, the circular economy can reduce certain costs. For example, in 2020 the Washington-based Association of Plastic Recyclers released a study comparing energy profiles of the environmental burden of virgin resin versus recycled resin. From the study, comparing just the expended energies of recycled polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene and polypropylene shows the virgin plastic expended energies for these materials are 1.7, 3 and 3 times the expended energies of their postconsumer recycled plastic counterparts, respectively. That is, it takes more energy to produce virgin resin from raw chemicals than it does to create postconsumer recycled resin that can be reused in one form or another. Using more recycled content—which manufacturers may be able to do using their internal processes—rather than buying virgin resin can cut costs and ultimately has a positive environmental impact. Getting consumers to cooperate can be a challenge, but environmental consciousness already has received significant publicity, and many communities have either legally mandated or strongly recommended participation in recycling programs. Additionally, many product manufacturers who use plastic packaging or containers indicate that the plastic is recyclable. Some cities have banned single-use plastic grocery bags, and some stores sell their own branded, reusable bags or have receptacles for disposing the single-use plastic. Replacing plastic drinking straws with paper ones is one well-known example. Biodegradable “eco-plastics,” formulated from organic starches or from cellulose, are also an option in some cases. Again, it’s a matter of raising and sustaining awareness of the issue. Get onboard with the circular economy According to The SustainAbility Institute , London, “Society needs to stop thinking of plastic as 'waste,' but as a renewable resource that needs to be disposed of correctly.”  “Disposed of” are probably not the words to use here, rather recycled, reused or remanufactured. For plastics manufacturers, if plastic byproducts or defective products are recycled internally, there are potential significant cost savings within their own manufacturing process. If not, recycling programs can be set up so that the material goes to a plastic compounder that can turn it into a reusable resin. Always ask the waste haulers who collect the byproducts about where the material will end up to ensure that it won’t be dumped in a landfill. And, in every case, manufacturers can take care that their plastic scrap is properly sorted and that employees are trained to know what to do with it. While the circular economy might not ever be perfected, there are practices and processes that can be put in place now as at least steps toward that final goal. Plastics manufacturers, those companies who use their products and end consumers can all play a role. The key is being environmentally conscious and willing to do the major and even the seemingly small things that support the effort. A.J. Dilenno is vice president of commodity managed services at RWS Facility Services , which is headquartered in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Dilenno is responsible for marketing all commodity fiber and resin throughout North America for the company. He also is responsible for maintaining and growing RWS’ national customer relationships with paper mills and plastic resin compounders, reprocessors and tolling companies. He has more than 10 years’ experience in the recycling and waste industry. Knoxville, Tennessee-based Binova Group has started to sell its ZEROdor Odor Dispersion unit, which it calls “the first-ever gravity-powered odor control unit” for the solid waste collection sector. According to Binova, the ZEROdor unit mounts or welds into the sidewall of front- or rear-load waste and recycling containers, and holds within it ZEROdor granules. The company calls those “odor control pellets [that] are automatically dispersed during dumping.” “We’ve had requests for years to help solve the serious odor problems so common in solid waste,” says Tyler Smith, Binova’s director of product innovation. “The ZEROdor unit does just that and requires no power source to disperse an even spread of ZEROdor granules into almost any steel dumpster. Just load and go.” Binova describes ZerOdor granules as small pellets made from a dry-clay base that eliminate bad odors and absorb bacteria-friendly moisture. Sean Bowyer, Binova’s CEO, says the product has been of interest to some of the largest players in the solid waste sector. “ZerOdor dispensers work by harnessing the dumping action already taking place when the waste container is emptied,” he adds. “Once the container is inverted, the lower chamber of the dispersion unit is filled, and as the dumpster is turned upright again, a measured amount of ZEROdor granules are spread across the bottom of the container.” A typical unit has to be filled 3 or 4 times per year, says the company. ZEROdor Dispersion Units are built in the United States “using heavy-duty 16-gauge steel, and [are] powder-coated for many years of use in the elements,” adds Binova Group. The company says the ZerODOR has a weather-tight lid to keep moisture out, and its chamber holds up to 20 pounds of ZEROdor granules. The device also carries “a full two-year warranty,” says Binova Group. Binova Group  also makes and markets the EnviroBIN Subsurface Waste Container System, the BinPAK Compactor, the EnviroSCREEN Dumpster Enclosure and PitBUL Automatic Bar Locks.

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Binova Patents

Binova has filed 2 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Bottles
  • Legal doctrines and principles
  • Shipbuilding
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

10/31/2017

6/4/2019

Tires, Waste collection, Legal doctrines and principles, Bottles, Shipbuilding

Grant

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00/00/0000

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Application Date

10/31/2017

00/00/0000

Grant Date

6/4/2019

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Title

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Related Topics

Tires, Waste collection, Legal doctrines and principles, Bottles, Shipbuilding

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Status

Grant

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