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Asavie

asavie.com

Founded Year

2003

Stage

Acquired | Acquired

About Asavie

Asavie enable operators to deliver branded value-added remote access services to subscribers on mobile handsets, laptops and desktop PCs. With no capital expenditure or ongoing operational overheads, Asavie provide the cost effective way to deliver mobility services to customers of all sizes.On October 27th, 2020, Asavie was acquired by Akamai Technologies. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

Headquarters Location

24 Herbert Lane Dublin, Co. Dublin

Ireland

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Asavie Patents

Asavie has filed 1 patent.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Computer network security
  • Cryptographic protocols
  • Network protocols
patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

8/23/2016

12/29/2020

Network protocols, Computer network security, Wireless networking, Computer networking, Virtual private networks

Grant

Application Date

8/23/2016

Grant Date

12/29/2020

Title

Related Topics

Network protocols, Computer network security, Wireless networking, Computer networking, Virtual private networks

Status

Grant

Latest Asavie News

Cities seek startups for clever solutions (Sponsored)

Dec 15, 2020

Smart cities are using digital technologies to improve their services and make their urban spaces more livable for their residents. The municipalities of the Ruhr area, in Germany, are very active in this regard and rely on startups as innovative partners. Five million people, 53 cities, 11 highways, zero coal mines: the Ruhr metropolitan area is one of Europe’s largest urban centres, and has been undergoing structural change for decades. This region formerly known for coal and steel production is on its way to becoming a modern, knowledge-based economy, with greentech, hydrogen, IT, and health among the pioneering technology clusters that it hosts. The region’s cities are continuing to accelerate this transformation, relying on smart city concepts that leverage big data and state-of-the-art technologies to achieve an improved quality of life for the people who live there. Together with research institutes and industry, they are developing digital solutions in the areas of urban mobility, energy, health, and services. This translates to many opportunities for startups, as they are welcome partners for smart city projects in the cities of the Ruhr region. CityTech RUHR Challenge showcases the potential of partnerships The great interest in cooperation between cities and startups was made evident in the CityTech RUHR Challenge, which was held for the first time this year. Cities from the Ruhr area defined challenges, and more than 100 startups from 27 countries submitted proposals to meet these challenges with their digital solutions. In June, a jury awarded prizes to the three best ideas, with the winning startups receiving contracts totaling 10K for their projects in the cities of Bochum, Bottrop, and Hagen. The pilot projects were successfully implemented through the end of October, and demonstrated the innovative potential partnerships between smart cities and startups. Faster building, better shopping, healthier living Together with the city of Bochum, London startup Kyanite360 developed a digital platform for an automated, preliminary review of construction applications (which is based on ‘building information modeling’, or BIM). Real estate companies, the city administration, and people looking for apartments will be the ultimate beneficiaries, as this new technology allows buildings to be constructed more quickly. For the city of Bottrop, Israeli startup Placense has analyzed data on people’s movement and behavioural patterns in Bottrop’s city centre. Decision-makers in Bottrop can use the data to make the downtown area more attractive. In the third CityTech RUHR pilot project, Berlin startup Changers developed the Hagen Heroes app for the city of Hagen. This app rewards healthy and sustainable behavior on the part of the citizens of Hagen: for instance when they travel by bike more often. A point of entry for the Ruhr metropolitan area ecosystem For municipalities in the Ruhr region, adopting smart city concepts is not just a short-term challenge but a long-term strategy, so new opportunities are constantly emerging for companies with smart city solutions. For interested startups, the digital platform Matchmaker Ruhr is the perfect tool to search for partners: it brings together cities, institutes, established companies, and startups. Founders of startups can also use it to stay up to date on research plans, municipal projects, and upcoming tenders. Artificial intelligence helps those involved to find the right partners. Are you curious about partnership opportunities for your startup? Check out Matchmaker Ruhr’s website for more information. Marathon Venture Capital in Athens, Greece has completed the first closing of its second fund, reaching the €40m / $47M mark. Backing the new fund is the European Investment Fund, HDBI, as well as corporates, family offices and HNWIs around the world (plus many Greek founders). It plans to invest in Seed-stage startups from €1m to 1.5m initial tickets for 15-20% of equity. Team changes include Thaleia Misailidou being promoted to Principal, and Chris Gasteratos is promoted to Associate. Marathon’s most prominent portfolio company is Netdata, which last year raised a $17 million Series A led by Bain Capital, and later raised another $14m from Bessemer. On the success side, Uber’s pending $1.4B+ acquisition of BMW/Daimler’s mobility group was in part driven by a Greek startup, Taxibeat, which was earlier acquired by Daimler. Taxibeat was backed by an earlier fund previously created by Tziralis. Partners George Tziralis and Panos Papadopoulos tell me the fund is focused generally on enterprise/B2B, plus “Greek founders, anywhere”. Learnworlds (business-in-a-box for course creators) Causaly (cause-and-effect discovery in pharma) Augmenta (autonomous precision agriculture) Tziralis tells me the majority of its next ten companies have already raised a Series A round. Tziralis and Papadopoulos have been key players in the Greek startups scene, backing many of the first startups to emerge from the country over 13 years ago. And they were enthusiastic backers of our TechCrunch Athens meetup many years ago. Three years ago, they launched Marathon Venture Capital to take their efforts to the next level. Fund I invested in 10 companies with the first fund, and most have raised a Series A. The portfolio as a whole has raised 4x their total invested amount and maintains an estimated total enterprise value of $350 million. They’ve also been running the “Greeks in Tech” meetups all over the world – Berlin to London to New York to San Francisco, and many more locations in between, connecting with Greek founders. Akamai revealed on Tuesday that it had acquired Asavie, a company based in Ireland that offers applications for mobility, IoT and cybersecurity. Asavie has built a tool that supports businesses by positioning assets within private network slices to protect their phones and IoT computers. The organisation claims that to protect networks, it uses machine learning and anomaly detection. Akamai believes that its purchase of Asavie is part of its 5 G security advancement plan and plans to extend its capacity to protect smartphone and other wireless devices in more and more remote business environments. Akamai has agreed that the products from Asavie will become part of its product range for Encryption and Personalization Services. The group announced that it had purchased Asavie in an all-cash transaction that is not supposed to have a material effect on its 2020 financial performance, although it has not announced the exact sum it paid for the Irish company. Asavie hires over 130 employees, The Irish Times said , and last year the firm posted sales of EUR 23.6 million ($28 million) and pretax income of EUR 1.9 million ($2.2 million). According to Dr. Tom Leighton, CEO and co-founder of Akamai, “We believe the acquisition of Asavie would help Akamai ‘s carrier partners meet business and mid-market consumer demand for IoT and mobile device protection and management services.” “What’s interesting about the Asavie approach is that it has been shown to be very easy to scale and secure as more IoT devices connect via cellular and 5G.” A total of 28 organisations have been purchased by Akamai in recent years, including four companies last year. Earlier this year, Instart, a California-based company that offers solutions to enhance application efficiency , customer interface and security, announced the acquisition of clients and intellectual property. Since 2015, Akamai has posted sales above $2 billion last year and hit almost $3 billion last year. In April 2019, Ford Motors created a new division representing multiple lines, including micro-mobility, non-emergency medical transport and city solutions. General Motors, a 110 year old company, rebranded as General Mobility offering services in real-time vehicle diagnostics, dealer notification and driver scoring to improve performance. Emerging trends in automotive industry allude to a future of connected, autonomous, shared and electric mobility and are poised to alter the auto insurance industry as we know it. A fourth of motor premium is forecast to shift to these new domains in the next decade. Recently, we saw Tesla announce plans to launch an insurance company. In Asia, ride-hailing giant Gojek and platform leader Grab have launched auto insurance. Traditional OEM manufacturers such as Toyota are actively building new mobility models and insurance plays. What are the forces shaking up the mobility industry and in its wake, leaders in insurance? New models to address transportation needs that include ride-hailing, car-share, car subscriptions, micro-mobility are growing, as a means to augment existing modes of transport. Along with such mobility-as-a-service models, the advances in autonomous vehicle (AV) technology are envisaged to reduce individual ownership of vehicles, triggering a shift in coverages from personal to fleet and AV manufacturers. Concomitantly, mass market adoption of advanced driver assistance system and other AV tech is reshaping perception of risks. Additional risks such as covering for autonomous driving by cars or for charging cords are new opportunities. The balance of personal to commercial premiums is forecast to shift and traditional premiums expected to fall due to higher road safety through AVs. Till recently, automotive OEMs focused on selling, servicing and financing their vehicles. For selling insurance, they used referral route. But increasingly, like Tesla, OEMs are offering insurance to car owners. The motivation varies and in Tesla’s case, it seems to be a hedge against high premiums charged for its cars. Insurance is considered a barrier for many of Tesla’s innovations. By offering insurance, it will be easier to sell self-driving vehicles. Tesla plans to use anonymized data collected by its fleet of vehicles and offer 20-30% discounts. The silver lining is that in every accident, Tesla has instant access to errant driver behavior data leading to risk reducing improvements in autopilot, stability control, anti-theft systems and bullet-resistant steel. Toyota has formed a mobility company called Monet with Japanese automakers, testing self-driving systems. For the 2020 Olympics, it was ready to launch e-Palette self-driving shuttles to transport athletes. For its car owners, Toyota Insurance has teamed up with Nationwide to launch a telematics offering that promises up to 40 percent savings. As automotive OEMs move into car insurance, repair costs will matter as much as original build costs. As car designs begin to assimilate medical and repair experience data, future cars can be built to minimize repair costs and increase safety, leading to lower customer premiums. Mobility-as-a-service ride-hailing giant Gojek in Indonesia has launched an online insurance offering in partnership with an insurtech company for travel, motor vehicles and mobile device protection. For its 9+ million drivers, merchants and agents in a network spread across Southeast Asian markets, Grab had an impressive captive audience to promote its nascent insurance services and uses a partnership model to deliver digital insurance products to its drivers through the driver app. The stakes are high. Private passenger auto insurance is a substantial part of P&C insurance market and offers considerable future economic value. The future of mobility is bound to stir change along the auto insurance value chain spurring demand for alternative insurance products and services. Insurers will be challenged to manage overwhelming data volumes and ecosystems centered on users will see them refine product offerings and bundle risk covers. Mobileye ’s computer vision technology will be used in a new premium electric vehicle called Zero Concept from Geely Auto Group , one of China’s largest privately-held automobile manufacturers. Mobileye’s owner Intel made the announcement today at the Beijing Auto Show. Zero Concept is produced by Lynk & Co., the brand formed as a joint venture between Geely Auto and Volvo Car Group, and uses Mobileye’s SuperVision driving-assistance system. Intel also announced that Mobileye and Geely Auto have signed a long-term, high-volume agreement for advanced driver-assistance systems that means more Geely Auto vehicles will be equipped with Mobileye’s computer vision technology. In a post, Mobileye chief executive officer and Intel senior vice president Amnon Shashua wrote that the deal is the first time “Mobileye will be responsible for the full solution stack, including hardware and software, driving policy and control.” He added “it also marks the first time that an OEM has publicly noted Mobileye’s plan to provide over-the-air updates to the system after deployment. While this capacity has always been in our repertoire, Geey and Mobileye want to assure customers that we can easily scale their driving-assistance features and keep everything up to date across the car’s lifetime.” Based in Israel, Mobileye was acquired by Intel in 2017 for $15.3 billion . Its technology and services are used in vehicles from automakers including BMW, Audi, Volkswagen, Nissan, Honda and General Motors, and includes features that warn drivers about issues like blind spots, potential lane departures, collision risks and speed limits. Geely Auto’s parent company is Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, also the parent company of Volvo Car Group. In 2019, Geely Auto Group says its brands sold a total of more than 1.46 million units. China is one of the fastest-growing electric vehicle markets in the world , and even though sales were hurt by the COVID-19 pandemic, government policies, including consumer subsidies and investment in charging infrastructure, are expected to help its EV market recover .

Asavie Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • When was Asavie founded?

    Asavie was founded in 2003.

  • What is Asavie's latest funding round?

    Asavie's latest funding round is Acquired.

  • Who are the investors of Asavie?

    Investors of Asavie include Akamai.

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