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asana.com

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Founded Year

2008

Stage

IPO | IPO

Total Raised

$212M

Date of IPO

9/30/2020

Market Cap

23.87B

Stock Price

134.07

Revenue

$0000 

About Asana

Asana (NYSE: ASAN) is a web and mobile application designed to help teams organize, track, and manage their work.

Asana Headquarter Location

1550 Bryant Street Suite 200

San Francisco, California, 94103,

United States

415-525-3888

Latest Asana News

NFTs have the potential to flip Hollywood’s studio model upside down

Oct 22, 2021

The QQ Reading app, operated by China Literature Ltd., also owns Webnovel. Photo: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images October 22, 2021 Zeyi Yang is a reporter with Protocol | China. Previously, he worked as a reporting fellow for the digital magazine Rest of World, covering the intersection of technology and culture in China and neighboring countries. He has also contributed to the South China Morning Post, Nikkei Asia, Columbia Journalism Review, among other publications. In his spare time, Zeyi co-founded a Mandarin podcast that tells LGBTQ stories in China. He has been playing Pokemon for 14 years and has a weird favorite pick. October 22, 2021 A weapon master reborn into the land of magic beasts; a clever internet-cafe manager who wins every esports championship; a demonic outcast given a second chance at life to win back his childhood sweetheart. These are all stories created by Chinese authors that are now being read around the world. Having built a thriving multibillion-dollar web fiction industry at home, Chinese web novel platforms are increasingly looking to sell their stories — and the innovative way they mass-produce them — to literature lovers abroad. And it's working. There are currently about 145 million overseas readers of Chinese web novels, according to Chinese analytics firm iResearch , making it China's most successful 21st-century cultural export to date. Popcorn literature The web novel industry has been steadily growing in China since 2002, with the founding of Qidian, one of the earliest and largest web novel platforms. What was the amateur, spontaneous production of Chinese web novels eventually became a profitable industry. There are two things that make Chinese web novels distinct: the speed with which authors write, and the pricing model. Chinese web novels are supposed to be consumed while the author is writing. Every day, fans log on to the platform, find the latest chapter (usually updated on a daily basis) and pay for it. The cost is usually less than $1, but when a novel has thousands of fans and also thousands of chapters, the profits can be immense. In China, the most popular novels can often last as long as 3 million characters. Writers publish about 3,000 to 8,000 words every day and sometimes feel the need to write more just to keep up with readers' appetites. Works, never models of brevity given the incentives, are usually the literary equivalent of a popcorn movie. In Chinese, they are called shuangwen (爽文), or stories that impart a brief dopamine high. But they have a massive reader base, one that's willing to pay. Many of the most popular stories have been adapted into TV series or movies. In fact, the most commercially successful Chinese television shows of recent years are adapted from web novels. And soon enough, people started to realize these web novels could have global appeal. Around 2016, fan-operated websites popped up where volunteers translated Chinese novels into English and Russian. "In the beginning, it was unthinkable. No one at the time could see that someone would willingly translate a Chinese novel with millions of characters," said Ji Yunfei, assistant professor at Sun Yat-sen University and one of the first academics to research the global reach of Chinese web novels. Selling the fantasy Today, amateur fan translation has been replaced by Chinese web novel platforms that own the publishing rights to millions of novels and see the potential to sell their IP worldwide. Take the U.S. iOS App Store as an example. According to Sensor Tower , of the top five best-grossing apps in the "Books" category, three (Dreame, GoodNovel and Webnovel) have Chinese backgrounds. One Chinese publication combed through the top 50 best-grossing book apps and found that 25 of them were developed by Chinese companies. Their secret sauce: these apps have cribbed the business model of their Chinese counterparts, in which novels can be purchased per chapter, leading to constant in-app spend. The experience is also gamified, with in-app mechanisms to gain coupons and free chapters. Some apps also cater to a specific reader community, from thriller fans to LGBTQ+ readers. The stories found on the apps are a mix of those translated from Chinese and those written by native speakers. Over the years, translation capacity has become one of the biggest bottlenecks, with millions of Chinese novels ready to be translated yet far fewer humans to do it. Since 2019, some companies have been using AI translators to increase the capacity, but results are subpar. Many of these mobile platforms are backed by prominent Chinese companies with global ambitions.The most prominent company is Webnovel, a subsidiary of China Literature, China's biggest web novel company, ultimately owned by Tencent. Webnovel was launched in 2017 and has been the pioneer of exporting Chinese web novels. According to the company , by the end of 2020, Webnovel had translated nearly 1,000 Chinese novels and had an annual readership of 54 million. There's also Fictum, a web novel app targeting U.S. and Indonesian readers developed by ByteDance, and Wonderfic , which targets Spanish-speaking countries, developed by smartphone and home device maker Xiaomi. Global social media platforms, most of them unavailable in China, have become important marketing tools for Chinese web novel companies to reach foreign readers. A 2021 survey shows that 42.7% of overseas readers were introduced to Chinese novels through ads. Facebook is especially eager to attract Chinese advertisers. It lists Webnovel as one of its success cases and has published a white paper in Chinese on how web novel platforms can use Facebook for marketing. In January, David Chen, Facebook's industry director for the greater China region, told Chinese media that there were over 200 Chinese web novel apps promoted on Facebook in 2020. Ads often take the form of a striking illustration plus a sensational, almost clickbait-y quote. For American readers, "the [visual] elements should prioritize a kink-ish style," one Chinese marketing agency explains in a how-to guide to the U.S. market. Some people may find them louche. It's not hard to find people on Twitter complaining about how some of these ads verge on bestiality, pedophilia or ableism. "With the lack of editorial oversight, a lot of web novels end up with a lot more grossly problematic content," said Gabriella Buba, a Filipino writer in Texas who likes to read web novels. Cultivating native writers The huge success of a handful of Chinese stories has been great for the platforms, but also unpredictable and hard to replicate. Within China, the industry isn't just built on that. It's also about the thousands of B-list or amateur authors constantly pumping out new works to keep readers on the platforms. To recreate that overseas, Chinese platforms have begun to cultivate non-Chinese writers. And the platforms have plenty of experience from the two decades of competing within China. Many platforms have launched writing contests to attract writers. In March, Webnovel said it will award $20,000 to fiction-writing contest winners and promised to present the winning work on screens in Times Square. Its goal, the company said, is to add 50,000 authors from North America to the platform in one year.The ByteDance-owned Fictum also organized a writing contest themed "Romancing the Werewolf/Billionaire," with a $30,000 first prize. "From selling content to selling the business model, this is a natural transition," said Ji, the assistant professor. Proven methods, like giving new writers several months of fixed salary to subsidize the early stage of slow audience growth, have been very effective at cultivating and sustaining authors. But continued success isn't guaranteed. Amazon launched Kindle Vella in July, whose business model and novel genres closely resemble its Chinese peers. Lately, Korean novel and comics apps are another strong force in the market, with two of Korea's largest digital media companies spending large to acquire American web novel startups. With less experience in producing global cultural sensations, Chinese companies have a long way to go. From Your Site Articles Kate Silver is an award-winning reporter and editor with 15-plus years of journalism experience. Based in Chicago, she specializes in feature and business reporting. Kate's reporting has appeared in the Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Atlantic's CityLab, Atlas Obscura, The Telegraph and many other outlets. September 21, 2021 The way we work has fundamentally changed. COVID-19 upended business dealings and office work processes, putting into hyperdrive a move towards digital collaboration platforms that allow teams to streamline processes and communicate from anywhere. According to the International Data Corporation , the revenue for worldwide collaboration applications increased 32.9 percent from 2019 to 2020, reaching $22.6 billion; it's expected to become a $50.7 billion industry by 2025. "While consumers and early adopter businesses had widely embraced collaborative applications prior to the pandemic, the market saw five years' worth of new users in the first six months of 2020," said Wayne Kurtzman, research director of social and collaboration at IDC. "This has cemented collaboration, at least to some extent, for every business, large and small." Businesses using these applications before the pandemic may have had a smoother transition to remote work. That was the case for British footwear brand Dr. Martens , which had been using the Asana platform to streamline work and communications for its global marketing team. Asana allows businesses of all sizes to organize strategic initiatives; monitor timelines, status and workloads across team projects; provide feedback on documents; request approvals on work; automate work processes and more. When COVID-19 caused offices to close, Stacey Kemp, who is the creative services manager at Dr. Martens, says Asana helped them adapt. "With 2020 forcing us to drastically change our way of working, our 'facetime' initially went up and productivity within work hours plummeted. To combat this, we had to get much better at giving clear instructions, feedback, and having discussions via written word. Asana helped us bring everyone's thought process into one centralized place," she says. This fall, as enterprises everywhere decide whether to return to the office, continue working remotely or establish a hybrid working model, collaborative technology platforms will be more important than ever, says Anne Raimondi, chief operating officer of Asana. "As we continue in uncertain times, a platform that allows for well coordinated and distributed work is a must-have for any nimble organization. It allows work to continue in-person or remotely, with consistency, reliability and maximum flexibility." "When organizations are able to forge ahead with the core tenets of teamwork — clarity, transparency and accountability — then they're able to continue their mission with passion and empowerment, whether their team is at the office or at home," says Anne Raimondi, chief operating officer of Asana Raimondi shared the following advice with business leaders as they overcome COVID-19 survival mode and move into the next productive work phase, whatever shape that may take. 1. Reduce "work about work." Some call it busy work, some call it a threat to productivity. The Asana team calls it "work about work," and says it applies to communicating about work, searching for information, switching between apps, managing changing priorities, following up on the status of projects and other tasks involving work coordination rather than making headway on the skilled work itself. According to Asana's " Anatomy of Work Index 2021: Overcoming Disruption in a Distributed World ," 60% of workers' time is spent on this kind of work, while 40% of time is spent on the skilled job a person was hired to do. In order to increase productivity and create room for meaningful work, businesses must first identify the areas that are detracting from that work. "When work about work happens, skilled work doesn't. To solve for this, consider reducing the number of unnecessary meetings, blocking time for focused work and streamlining workflows across teams using a collaborative platform," says Raimondi. "When you empower your team to do the work they were literally hired to do, you'll see your employees — and your organization — flourish." 2. Banish burnout. The pandemic has tested us all physically, mentally and emotionally. Businesses everywhere are starting to see that toll on their teams in the form of burnout, which the World Health Organization defines as "a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed." According to Asana 71% of workers experienced burnout in the last year. Almost half (46%) of respondents said they were overworked, while 32% said they were unable to switch off or disconnect and 29% cited a lack of clarity on tasks and roles. "Employees have spoken, and they're not ok," says Raimondi. "Leaders must take the reins here and work to understand, address and eliminate the root causes of burnout." Across the country, corporations are finding ways to tackle burnout, such as camera-free days , or time off for mental health purposes. Asana has had a long-standing "No Meeting Wednesday" policy, which will evolve as employees return to the office and allow for the hybrid options of "Work from Home Wednesdays" and "Flexible Fridays" to allow for options and time to focus on creative or strategic work. 3. Be ready to adapt. According to Asana's research , 65% of employees believe that the skills needed for their job will evolve. Raimondi says that flexibility, today, can best be supported by technology, like Asana, that helps workers carry out their jobs, regardless of what is happening in the world around them. "When organizations are able to forge ahead with the core tenets of teamwork — clarity, transparency and accountability — then they're able to continue their mission with passion and empowerment, whether their team is at the office or at home," she says. That's been the case at GoodRx , says Tori Marsh, who is the company's director of research. "Before COVID-19, Asana was our bible for the team. Now, it's even more so. Rather than talking to my coworkers on the other side of the table, we're communicating in Asana comments. We're still able to track everything that's going on without being there in person." As business leaders set their expectations and goals for the new office environment — hybrid or otherwise — it's certain that flexibility and adaptability will be key. Organizations of all sizes may benefit from a reliable work management system that allows for order, consistency and clarity, so that employees working from anywhere can focus on the work they were hired to do, and not the extraneous tasks that can detract from their goals and their organization's purpose. To learn more about Asana, visit Asana.com Keep ReadingShow less Ben Brody (@ BenBrodyDC ) is a senior reporter at Protocol focusing on how Congress, courts and agencies affect the online world we live in. He formerly covered tech policy and lobbying (including antitrust, Section 230 and privacy) at Bloomberg News, where he previously reported on the influence industry, government ethics and the 2016 presidential election. Before that, Ben covered business news at CNNMoney and AdAge, and all manner of stories in and around New York. He still loves appearing on the New York news radio he grew up with. October 21, 2021 The FTC on Thursday unveiled a report highlighting that internet service providers — the companies that get you online at home or on your phone — need to be at least as much a part of the privacy conversation as Facebook… even if the government appears hamstrung in overseeing their practices. "Many ISP's in our study can be at least as privacy-intrusive as large advertising platforms," FTC attorney Andrea Arias said, announcing the findings of the study on AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Google Fiber and T-Mobile as well as some of their advertising affiliates. The report, which was based on 2019 information demands and public reporting, details how some of the companies make use of extensive granular user data, including mobile app usage, web browsing, search contents and more. The companies use the data to provide certain services as well as for advertising, sometimes collecting more than appeared necessary to supply services. Notably, the companies disclose very little to consumers about how their information is used. The FTC also found that ISPs often combine customer data from across business lines, products and services, pulling together information from broadband businesses with information from other divisions such as TV, home security or even wearables. Some of the broadband providers covered in the report also shared users' real-time location data with third parties, which could go to those giving medical assistance but sometimes ends up in the hands of others, such as bounty hunters . Some of the broadband providers also grouped consumers together for advertising purposes using sensitive characteristics such as religion, ethnicity or political affiliation, or proxies for them. Segments included "pro-choice," "African-American," "Jewish," "Asian Achievers," "Gospel and Grits" and more, the report found. The FTC did not name which companies engaged in which practices and made clear that not every company was engaged in every tactic in the report. Some details in the report had already emerged in public reporting. Several of the ways ISPs collect data may concern users, the report suggests, including the combining of several data streams as well as ISPs' ability to ignore user settings in browsers and apps that may block some tracking. Any concern that users might have about these practices, however, likely falls into a regulatory black hole. In most cases, the FCC, rather than the FTC, regulates broadband service. In late 2016, the FCC adopted a rule that would limit the ways in which ISPs could collect and use customers' personal data. Early on in the Trump administration, however, Congress annulled that rule using a procedure that also prohibits the agency from reissuing any substantially similar rule in the future. Even if the two Democrats on the FCC wanted to take another stab at ISP privacy and tried to formulate new, highly original regulations, the commission is still facing political gridlock because of President Biden's nearly unprecedented delay in naming a chair to the agency. With four commissioners in place — split evenly among party lines — any such rule is unlikely at best to win a majority vote. In addition, a long further delay could actually put the Republicans into the majority on the commission because Jessica Rosenworcel, the acting chair, must leave by the end of the year unless she's renominated and confirmed. That leaves the FTC, which has the power to enforce laws against companies that engage in deceptive or misleading business practices. That, to date, has made it the country's de facto federal privacy regulator. The agency has also reportedly been mulling over new rules on digital privacy overall. But the FTC is busy. Under chair Lina Khan, the FTC has taken up a time- and resource-intensive agenda that also is aiming for broader enforcement of both monopolization and mergers, additional rules governing industries and more. That may leave little room to try to oversee industries like internet service that theoretically already have a dedicated regulator — although former FCC chair Ajit Pai, a Republican who oversaw and applauded the rollback of the privacy rule, said at the time that privacy should fall under the FTC's auspices. The FTC is also currently politically split as well, although Biden has nominated a third Democrat to join the commission pending approval from the Senate. "The Federal Communications Commission has the clearest legal authority and expertise to fully oversee internet service providers," Khan said after Arias detailed the report's findings. "I fully support efforts to reassert that authority." Keep ReadingShow less October 21, 2021 When it comes to companywide vaccine mandates, maybe it's OK to mess with Texas. Five of the largest tech companies that have implemented vaccine mandates told Protocol they haven't changed policy in Texas or elsewhere in response to a new state executive order banning any "entity in Texas" from requiring the shot. Mandates remain in place nationwide at Google, Facebook, Twitter and Lyft, according to those companies, all of which have a presence in Texas. Even Houston-based HPE will go so far as to place its employees on unpaid leave if they don't show proof of vaccination or qualify for a medical or religious exemption, the company announced yesterday. Rather than following the Texas order, HPE is making vaccination a condition of employment for U.S. workers in order to "comply with President Biden's executive order and remain in good standing as a federal contractor," the company said. Gov. Abbott's vaccine 'anti-mandate' Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued the order last week as a challenge to the White House's September announcement of vaccine mandates impacting federal contractors and private employers with 100 employees or more. A bill that would have expanded on the executive order failed in the Texas Legislature on Tuesday. Abbott's executive order remains in effect, but a number of large companies are evidently ignoring it. Federal agencies are already requiring government contractors to have employees get vaccinated, and other large private employers are gearing up to require vaccines or regular testing under a forthcoming rule from the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Having a state challenge federal requirements may seem to complicate things for employers, but it's hard to make a case for Texas's order when federal law trumps state law under the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution. "It's kind of a 'devil versus the deep blue sea' issue for a lot of employers, especially government contractors who were already subject to mandates," said Aaron Goldstein, a labor and employment partner at the law firm Dorsey & Whitney. "It's hard to see how an executive order like this ends up being more than a stern suggestion to employers not to force their employees to be vaccinated." Goldstein said he was surprised to see that Abbott had issued the order under the Texas Disaster Act of 1975, whose stated purpose is to protect people from natural or manmade disasters, including epidemics. Banning vaccine mandates seems to be "the opposite of what the Texas Disaster Act was designed to accomplish," Goldstein said. Texas isn't the only state with an anti-mandate Montana's Legislature passed its own law earlier this year banning employers from requiring vaccines, calling vaccine mandates "discrimination." Other states could take action against employer vaccine mandates, but even if they do, they'll be irrelevant if the forthcoming emergency temporary standard from OSHA is upheld. "The states can't pass laws that contradict valid federal laws," Goldstein said. "The question is going to be: Is the OSHA mandate valid as an emergency rule, or will it get struck down?" A bigger issue: Exemptions In the meantime, the biggest question for many employers remains how — or whether — to accommodate employees who request exemptions for religious reasons. "There's been sort of a mass submission of requests for religious accommodations," Goldstein said. "Now you've got all of these form letters that people can print off the Internet, and a lot of folks believe this is their get-out-of-jail-free card to avoid vaccine mandates." Companies should feel free to push back on exemptions that cite factual inaccuracies about the vaccine — like a claim that there's pork gelatin in the shot, for example — and to question inconsistencies in employees' past behavior. If an employee's flu shot last year was also tested on stem cells, it's tough for them to argue they don't believe in ingesting anything that was tested on stem cells, Goldstein said. Still, employers should tread lightly, because the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission offers a wide berth to religious accommodations, Goldstein said. "Just because someone ate a slice of bacon two years ago doesn't mean you don't have to provide them a kosher meal at the company picnic if they request one," Goldstein said. Keep ReadingShow less Anna Kramer is a reporter at Protocol (Twitter: @ anna_c_kramer , email: akramer@protocol.com), where she writes about labor and workplace issues. Prior to joining the team, she covered tech and small business for the San Francisco Chronicle and privacy for Bloomberg Law. She is a recent graduate of Brown University, where she studied International Relations and Arabic and wrote her senior thesis about surveillance tools and technological development in the Middle East. October 21, 2021 Twitter is publicly sharing research findings today that show that the platform's algorithms amplify tweets from right-wing politicians and content from right-leaning news outlets more than people and content from the political left. The research did not identify whether or not the algorithms that run Twitter's Home feed are actually biased toward conservative political content, because the conclusions only show bias in amplification, not what caused it. Rumman Chowdhury, the head of Twitter's machine learning, ethics, transparency and accountability team, called it "the what, not the why" in an interview with Protocol. "We can see that it is happening. We are not entirely sure why it is happening. To be clear, some of it could be user-driven, people's actions on the platform, we are not sure what it is. It's just important that we share this information," Chowdhury said. The META team plans to conduct what she called a "root-cause analysis" to try to discover the "why," and that analysis will likely include creating testable hypotheses about how people use the platform that could help show whether it's the way users interact with Twitter or the algorithm itself that is causing this uneven amplification. Twitter didn't define for itself what news outlets and politicians are "right-leaning" or belong to right-wing political parties, instead using definitions from other researchers outside the company. The study looked at millions of tweets from politicians across seven countries and hundreds of millions of tweets of links from news outlets, not tweets from the outlets themselves. Chowdhury emphasized that Twitter doesn't already know what causes certain content to be amplified. "When algorithms get put out into the world, what happens when people interact with it, we can't model for that. We can't model for how individuals or groups of people will use Twitter, what will happen in the world in a way that will impact how people use Twitter," she said. Twitter algorithms cannot just be opened up and examined for biases, and the home feed isn't run by just one algorithm. It's a system that works together, creating "system-level complexity." She speculated that if the analysis doesn't find that the algorithms themselves are designed in a way that creates bias, other reasons for conservative content success could be that some right-wing politicians are better at selling their ideology online, or that the right is more successful at mobilizing support for its ideology. "The purpose is not to dump the responsibility on users here. There is a lot here for us to think about, how to give people more meaningful choice, more meaningful control over their input [to the algorithms], as well as the output that's going on." Twitter's META team — made up of some of the more renowned technology and algorithm ethicists and critics — promised to share its research with the public when it grew into a powerhouse unit as one of Twitter's 2021 priorities. But actually sharing that research with the world is difficult; Chowdhury and Lindsay McCallum, the Twitter spokesperson who works closely with the META team, described an intense process of debate over how to word and phrase each line in today's statement. While they insisted that there is broad internal support for META's transparency, Chowdhury and McCallum worry about accidentally miscommunicating the complex science behind the research. They know that news articles — like this one — are easily misinterpreted, and that the final takeaway for most people is a pretty diluted version of the research. Facebook has fallen under massive fire for failing to share the findings of its own social media research, revealed over the last month in a series of leaks to the Wall Street Journal. The company has seemed especially frustrated with how media and politicians have interpreted the leaked findings, and has also tried to emphasize the limitations of researchers' work. While they didn't mention Facebook, Chowdhury and her team have gone to great lengths to do the interpreting of the newly published paper themselves. Chowdhury also hinted at a coming announcement that Twitter has created a way to share the data used for its work for third-party validation of its scientific papers. While today's announcement doesn't specify what that will look like, Twitter said that it has finalized a partnership that will both allow for the privacy of its users and also give researchers the chance to replicate the study conducted here. "Anybody who makes algorithms and relies on them has the same questions we have," Chowdhury said. From Your Site Articles

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Expert Collections containing Asana

Expert Collections are analyst-curated lists that highlight the companies you need to know in the most important technology spaces.

Asana is included in 6 Expert Collections, including HR Tech.

H

HR Tech

3,964 items

HR tech startups are helping companies manage critical pain points in HR processes such as recruitment, automation, career development, compensation, and benefits management, through a mix of software and services.

S

Smart Money VCs (2017-2019)

6,297 items

We crunched the data to identify the 24 VC firms with the best combination of portfolio valuations and investment outcomes.

D

Development & Operations

381 items

Development & Operations offer designers, developers, engineers, and IT professionals ways to increase efficiency, reduce costs, and improve quality.

E

Enterprise SaaS

2,452 items

Software-as-a-service (SaaS) – internet based software offered as a subscription – continues to become the de facto standard for software distribution and consumption. Enterprise SaaS continues to show particular promise, emerging as one of the most well-funded categories. Startu

T

Tech IPO Pipeline 2019

286 items

T

Tech IPO Pipeline 2020

282 items

Track and capture company information and workflow.

Asana Patents

Asana has filed 29 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Collaboration
  • Graphical user interface elements
  • Data management
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Groupware, Software architecture, Application programming interfaces, Collaboration, Web applications

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