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ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES & EQUIPMENT | Recycling
agilyx.com

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Stage

Loan | Alive

Total Raised

$47.68M

Last Raised

$680K | 2 yrs ago

Revenue

$0000 

About Agilyx

Agilyx is an alternative energy company that uses patented, proven and commercially viable technology to convert difficult-to-recycle waste plastics into synthetic crude oil through a process that is scalable, versatile and environmentally positive.

Agilyx Headquarter Location

7904 SW Hunziker Street

Portland, Oregon, 97223,

United States

503-217-3160

Latest Agilyx News

Delterra CEO says packaging design is critical

Nov 29, 2021

Delterra CEO says packaging design is critical Dr. Shannon Bouton of non-profit consultancy Delterra says multiple-material packaging can be one of several recycling-unfriendly design techniques to avoid. Delterra, a non-profit organization focused on recycling, was founded earlier this with the support of global consultancy McKinsey & Co. Delterra traces its origins in part to the Rethinking Recycling initiative launched in 2018 by McKinsey-affiliated foundation McKinsey.org. As its mission, Delterra says it is intends to “focus on the world’s most complex systemic environmental challenges, where incentives, information, and infrastructure are misaligned, making them appear too hard, too complex, or too costly to fix.” While several such challenges fit that description, Delterra states, “To start, we’re tackling the broken recycling system in the global South.” Adds the non-profit group, “Today, we are reimagining and redesigning the recycling systems in Argentina and Indonesia. Over the next few years, we plan to scale our operations to other countries struggling with the growing waste crises across Asia, Latin America and Africa.” Recycling Today Senior Editor Brian Taylor recently had the opportunity to interview Delterra president and CEO Dr. Shannon Bouton regarding some of the opportunities identified by Delterra to improve packaging recyclability, diversion and processing. Recycling Today (RT): To what extent can an agreement on packaging standards between, say, an alliance of global consumer products companies help reduce waste and increase participation in recycling programs? Dr. Shannon Bouton (SB): There are many such efforts out there and they are doing good work on developing standards around packaging design, but more is definitely needed. On the recycling front, we need to work toward two goals: 1) simplifying the materials in packaging; and 2) signaling to the consumer what is recyclable more clearly and consistently. No pun intended, but let’s unpack each of these: Simplifying packaging refers to design principles like avoiding mixing different materials or switching to more easily recycled materials. One of the offenders we hear a lot about are “sachets.” These are packaging like those single-serve condiment packages you get at fast food restaurants. Often those have one type of plastic on the outside, a layer of metal in the middle, and a different type of plastic on the inside. Likely unknown to consumers, but something we should all be aware of: that [method of] construction makes them completely non-recyclable. Some packaging manufacturers are looking at how to make them out of one type of plastic that would at least make them technically recyclable if you can get people to collect them--an important challenge for another time. There are also a number of materials that even if they could technically be recycled, rarely if ever are, often due to cost or distance from the right recycling facilities. Packaging designers could choose to use easily recycled materials when designing packaging to help ensure the packaging is actually recycled. Signaling more clearly to the consumer what is recyclable is the other issue. Take that disposable cup from your favorite coffee place, for example. Most people are completely confused about what part can be recycled, does it need to be washed first, do you need to take it apart before you recycle it? Demystifying recycling for consumers would really help ensure the wrong stuff doesn’t end up in the bin. This might sound like a small issue but, in fact, one of the big challenges we face is “wishful recycling,” or when people put things in the recycling bin that cannot be recycled and which may even contaminate other materials or clog up machinery in the recycling plant, e.g., plastic bags. A growing number of companies are experimenting with how to tell the consumer what to do with the product, e.g., if this paper bag is greasy, it can be composted, if not, it can be recycled. Clear and consistent messaging could play a big role in making recycling initiatives more successful. Of course, recycling alone cannot eliminate waste. We need to redesign, reduce, reuse and recycle. But simplifying packaging and messaging around recycling will help reduce waste and increase the amount of material recycled. RT: How do the “chasing arrows” 1-7 codes currently affect participation in recycling/waste collection? To what extent would it be beneficial in reforming or replacing this system, if at all? SB: A lot of people think that the little triangle of chasing arrows with a number in it on the bottom of plastic containers means that the product can be recycled. That is not exactly true. The number indicates what kind of plastic resin the product is made from and has nothing to do with recyclability. In fact, plastic number 7 for example is simply “other” i.e., all plastics not listed in 1-6, and packaging with that number on it is often not collected or recycled by municipalities. The amount of confusion the chasing arrows triangle symbol continues to cause seems to me to be a strong argument to move to a different icon to indicate the kind of plastic, and possibly to add an additional symbol to indicate recyclability. The good news is that a few standardized labeling systems already exist. A good example is How2Recycle , which has developed different icons indicating recyclability, for example: “Widely Recycled,” “Check Locally,” “Not Yet Recycled” or “Store Drop-Off.” This type of messaging would help more than asking consumers to figure out what the numbers on the bottom of a bottle mean. However, standards such as these are yet to be widely adopted by the packaging industry and would need to be consistently used to be able to drive any real change. The bottom line on this is we have to factor in consumer knowledge in executing recycling programs--and the arrows are a good example of just how hard that can be. RT: To what extent do you think governments in nations with developing economies should reconsider single-use packaging material? SB: Nations should be looking at how to build a more circular economy that consumes fewer raw materials, less energy and less water. But that set of priorities must always be balanced by the realities of their citizens, especially those living in poverty and other difficult situations. Government-mandated phase-out of specific single-use packaging should not come without viable alternatives to meet both consumer needs as well as environmental goals. Fortunately, such alternatives do exist, and more are becoming available as packaging manufacturers experiment with new ways to make packaging simpler and thus more recyclable. RT: You recently commented that, “While consumer goods companies cannot fund entire national waste and recycling collection systems, demonstration projects won’t cut it.” Tell me what you mean by this. SB: It really was a call to action on the need for scale. Corporations shouldn’t just fund another demonstration project, but should instead put their efforts, expertise and funding into figuring out how to scale what works. There are wonderful demonstration projects all over the world, many of them funded by consumer goods companies and others developed by startups or community groups. The challenge is how to scale these projects so that they have the kind of impact we need to see to make real change happen. Practically, that means scaling some of those demonstration projects, as we are doing with our Rethinking Recycling Academy  in Indonesia. It also means looking across the full recycling ecosystem to understand what is preventing it from working and rethinking those challenges, too, so that you can improve the productivity of the whole value chain. We’ve heard, for example, that many companies are worried about human rights abuses in the recycling value chain. That means we need to create transparency and accountability across the value chain before we can unlock demand at scale from those companies. Understanding what is getting in the way of scale informs what we work on at Delterra and should also inform where consumer goods companies invest their resources if they are serious about really creating circularity in their supply chains. RT: Can you provide a positive case study or example of a packaging recycling loop in a nation with a developing economy that holds the promise of being replicated around the world? SB: Delterra is taking a systemic approach to dramatically improve the recovery of recyclable material, and the commitment to purchase and use recycled material at a fair price. That combines changing consumer recycling behavior, improving waste collection and sorting operations, and supply chain traceability for recycled content. We are seeing promising results that build on the strengths of informal recycling efforts while improving working conditions. We are now focusing on scaling what works faster and with fewer resources. Today we are operating in Indonesia and Argentina, and we are starting to look at taking our programs to new countries across Asia, South America and Africa. Other promising models are those that reuse and refill packaging, such as Siklus and Algramo, which also deliver cost savings to low and middle-income consumers. (Equivalents in higher-income settings also exist, such as Loop in the United States). Algramo was founded in Chile nearly a decade ago, but now has projects underway in Jakarta [Indonesia], New York, Mexico and London, which reinforces my earlier point—investment-worthy models are those that are repeatable and can drive impact at scale. The Recycling Association, Northampton, United Kingdom, has named Lee Thickett as head of U.K. operations for Traqa. The Recycling Association developed Traqa, which is a digital traceability and compliance business. The tool connects to weighbridges at load sites and digitizes export processes to help keep various members of the supply chain informed with information and documentation. In the new position, Thickett will lead the rollout of Traqa to both members and nonmembers of the Recycling Association. Prior to this appointment, Thickett worked for U.K.-based Palm Paper Ltd. for nearly 13 years. “I’m delighted to welcome Lee to Traqa, knowing he will bring enthusiasm and experience to the rollout of the product,” says Simon Ellin, chief executive of the Recycling Association . “It is a significant moment for us, as it shows our development as an organization representing the interests of our members and the wider recycling industry through the expansion of our Traqa software.” Ellin says Traqa will help to digitize the recycling export process and facilitate the traceability of materials and data sharing to ensure compliance. The program is currently being used by several members of the association. Ellin adds, “It means anyone in the recycling industry that moves material can streamline their processes, while shippers will benefit from the seamless transfer of data.”   "We are honored and humbled to have received this honor," says SDI Chairman and CEO Mark D. Millett. "We thank all of those that contributed to our success—our loyal customers, vendors, communities and shareholders. My heartfelt thanks also go to our extraordinary employees for their passion, innovation and dedication to each other and to a spirit of excellence. The entire Steel Dynamics team achieved a strong performance during the unchartered environment of 2020 and, most importantly, we did it safely."   Finalists were selected by two judges from the Fastmarkets editorial team, and those entries were scored by steel industry veterans who serve as judges to select the winners. The Fastmarkets award was the most recent recognition SDI has received recently. In early February, Forbes named the company one of the World’s Best Employers for 2021. SDI was the only U.S. steel producer to receive this designation and one of only 236 U.S.-based businesses to make the 2021 list, which is comprised of 750 global companies. "We are especially honored by this recognition," Millet says "Above all, we value the dedicated people whose drive, innovation and commitment have helped successfully grow our company and serve our customers. Our teams are the foundation and driver of our success. Their passion compels us to the highest standard of excellence, and their health and safety is our number one value. I thank each of them for their dedication to each other, our customers, and our communities." Forbes and Statista selected the World's Best Employers for 2021 based on independent surveys of roughly 150,000 employees in more than 55 countries working around the world. Participants were asked to rate employers on aspects such as image, trust, gender equality, corporate social responsibility, culture and benefits. The 750 companies that received the highest total scores made the final list. Investor's Business Daily recognized SDI on its list of the 100 Best ESG (environmental, social and governance) Companies of 2021. SDI was the only U.S. steel producer to receive this designation and one of only three steel producers globally. "We are honored by this acknowledgment," said Mark D. Millett, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. "Our recognition as one of the best ESG companies is due to the extraordinary passion and spirit of excellence exhibited by our teams. It is their drive and dedication to keep each other safe, to create innovative product and supply-chain solutions, and to be a leader in the steel industry regarding sustainability that propels Steel Dynamics to the highest standard of operational and financial performance. "    To determine the 100 Best ESG Companies, Investor's Business Daily screened Dow Jones ESG data, which includes more than 6,000 companies. SDI ranked in the No. 56 spot on the list, with an ESG score of 99 and a 14 percent return on investment. Independent Commodity Intelligence Services (ICIS), London, has released a new weekly pricing service for Europe, offering benchmarkable price quotes for mixed polyolefin bales, polyvinyl chloride- (PVC-) screened reject bales suitable for refuse-derived fuel and material recovery facility reject bales. According to a news release from ICIS , the shortage in supply of monomaterial plastic scrap to feed the mechanical recycling market has led to a spike in prices, with the cost of polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene and polypropylene doubling in the last year and high-density polyethylene quadrupling. ICIS reports that this has increased the relevance of mixed plastic bales, which were previously economically unviable due to sorting costs and yield losses. However, ICIS reports that mixed polyolefin waste bales are the main feedstock and the largest variable cost for chemical recycling producers in Europe. ICIS says these producers “are looking to other waste grades, specifically PVC-screened reject bales.” Additionally, demand is growing for unsorted reject bales from chemical recyclers and petrochemical firms with installed PVC sorting on-site. “These mixed waste markets are becoming increasingly important to a circular plastics economy,” says Louise Boddy, head of commercial strategy, sustainability at ICIS. “The new pricing service will enable players throughout the chain to make better informed purchasing decisions and support further investment in the waste and chemical recycling sectors by providing much needed price transparency to those markets.” ICIS says this new pricing service will enable customers to understand when and how much to pay for mixed plastic bales. It also will support chemical producers looking to invest in chemical recycling. In addition, ICIS says this new pricing service will help it to better track chemical recycling developments, which will complement data from the ICIS chemical Recycling Supply Tracker  that launched in October as well as the mechanical Recycling Supply Tracker it launched in February. “Having independent and regular prices for this industry will help customers make the best and most timely buying and selling decisions and enable [fast-moving consumer goods companies] to understand how the feedstock costs are impacting the cost of their end products. Mixed plastic waste pricing will provide vital transparency to this developing market,” Boddy adds. Circular recycling company Regenyx, based in Tigard, Oregon, has confirmed it has transitioned to 100 percent renewable energy at its facility. The company is a joint venture between Oslo, Norway-based Agilyx Corp., an early leader in the advanced recycling of postuse plastics, and polystyrene (PS) producer AmSty, The Woodlands, Texas. Regenyx will receive 100 percent of its electricity from wind sources through enrollment in the Green Future Enterprise program with Portland General Electric. According to a news release from Agilyx, using solely renewable energy sources supports a transition to a low-carbon economy which aligns with the company’s sustainability goals to mitigate the climate-related impacts of its operations and disclose the environmental footprint and energy efficiency of its circular recycling processes. “Agilx is using chemical recycling technology to help solve the problem of plastic waste in an effort to create a more sustainable circular economy for plastics,” Agilyx CEO Tim Stedman says. “Using electricity derived from nonrenewable resources to power that technology would be counterintuitive.” Tim Barnette, vice president of polymers and sustainability at AmSty, says the two companies are working to make circular recycling as efficient and carbon-neutral as possible. “We are optimistic that the move to wind-powered electricity will put us further down that path and we’re grateful to have this source available,” he says. The companies announced earlier this year an agreement to explore building an advanced recycling facility , proposing an initial scope of a 50-to-100-ton-per-day PS facility at AmSty’s styrene production facility in St. James, Louisiana. The technology is already in use at Regenyx in Oregon where postuse PS products are converted into virgin-equivalent styrene monomer.

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Agilyx Patents

Agilyx has filed 10 patents.

The 3 most popular patent topics include:

  • Bromides
  • Chemical processes
  • Commodity chemicals
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6/26/2020

6/22/2021

Chemical processes, Metal halides, Commodity chemicals, Polymers, Bromides

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Chemical processes, Metal halides, Commodity chemicals, Polymers, Bromides

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