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HEALTHCARE | Medical Facilities & Services / Medical Laboratories & Research
agentase.com

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Founded Year

1998

Stage

Acquired - II | Acquired

Total Raised

$4.99M

About Agentase

Agentase develops biocatalyst preparations. The company works with a variety of federal agencies and corporate clients to develop enzyme-based systems tailored to specific performance criteria. Its technology addresses the perceived limitations of enzyme catalysis such as short catalytic lifetimes that restrict product shelf life and reduce catalyst productivity, acute environmental sensitivity that limits the range of acceptable conditions for catalysis, and vulnerability to thermal denaturation by developing application vehicles capable of protecting enzymes from adverse environments while enhancing their utility in a specific application.

Agentase Headquarter Location

2240 William Pitt Way

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15238,

United States

412-423-2100

Latest Agentase News

US Army to receive new CIDAS neurotoxin detection equipment

Sep 30, 2020

by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login by Gerrard Cowan US Army units will soon begin receiving a chemical detection system designed to simplify and enhance neurotoxin detection, with plans to expand the technology’s use cases in the coming years. The Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System (CIDAS) was developed with initial funding from the Army Research Office (ARO), part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory (ARL). CIDAS is the FLIR Agentase C2 Disclosure Spray, and the system initially stemmed from funded efforts between ARL and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, with the latter founding a company – Agentase, LLC – in 1999 to further pursue the work. This company was acquired by FLIR Systems in 2010. The system is designed to catch particular classes of neurotoxins, such as nerve agents that are extremely toxic to humans. It can detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels, according to ARO. The system uses enzymes – which ARO defines as “complex proteins naturally produced by living organisms that act as a catalyst for specific biochemical reactions” – to quickly produce colour-based reactions with chemical warfare agents. When they are applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. When CIDAS is applied to a surface in liquid form as a spray, a colour change identifies the precise location of contamination by a chemical warfare agent. (ARO) The rapid colour change can be used to expedite the decontamination process by enabling up-front triage of contaminated equipment, as well as post-decontamination assurance that the threat has been successfully detoxified, said Jeremy Walker, director of science and technology for detection systems at FLIR. Already a Janes subscriber? Read the full article via the Client Login

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Agentase Patents

Agentase has filed 4 patents.

patents chart

Application Date

Grant Date

Title

Related Topics

Status

6/12/2013

9/27/2016

Ointments, Microbiology, Infectious diseases, Bacteria, Epidemiology

Grant

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Application Date

6/12/2013

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Grant Date

9/27/2016

00/00/0000

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Title

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Related Topics

Ointments, Microbiology, Infectious diseases, Bacteria, Epidemiology

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Status

Grant

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